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DjmUK

[HOW TO] Installing Wireless Networking

75 posts in this topic

Introduction

I would like to thank Bliksem who helped getting me connected to the Internet.

This tutorial was written using Blkisem's help, and the help of google. This works with a variety of wireless cards, but for the sake of things I'm going to explain preciesly how I installed this using a Linksys WMP54G Wireless Network Card (V2). I know this looks like a long tutorial because it's as detailed as I can get it (because it's all extremely fresh in my mind).

My Relevant Specs & Info

- Fedora Core 3 (aka Red Hat 12)

- Kernel 2.6.10-1.760 (works with previous kernels, including *.770 and 2.6.11)

- Linksys WMP54G Wireless Network Card (Version 2)

- Username: djmuk (/home/djmuk/) <-- change this to your own login name where appropriate.

Step 1: Downloading & Saving

1.) Download ndiswrapper and the Linksys WinXP Drivers

2.) Do NOT extract anything at this point unless specified

3.) Save the ndiswrapper-[version_number].tar.gz file onto a Floppy, CD-R/RW or DVD+-R/RW (or other storage mediums)

3.) Open up the WinXP Driver's .zip file and save the 2 files (bcmwl5.sys & bcmwl5.inf) onto a Floppy, CD-R/RW or DVD+-R/RW (or other storage mediums)

4.) You should have 3 files on your Floppy, CD-R/RW or DVD+-R/RW (or other storage mediums) [ndiswrapper-1.0.tar.gz, bcmwl5.sys & bcmwl5.inf]

Step 2: Installation (Part 1/2)

1.) Extract the 3 files (ndiswrapper-[version_number].tar.gz, bcmwl5.sys and bcmwl5.inf) to /home/djmuk/

2.) Open up your terminal (Shortcut: F4 - if you're in the /home/djmuk/ folder)

3.) Type: su (super-user)

4.) Type your 'root account' password

5.) Type: tar -zxvf ndis (hit tab to auto-complete file name, and hit enter)

6.) Type: cd ndis (hit tab to auto-complete folder name, and hit enter)

7.) Type: make (hit enter)

8.) Type: make install

Step 3: Verification & Installation (Part 2/2)

1.) Type: ls -l /lib/modules/`uname -r`/misc/ (hit enter). This verifies the installation of the kernel module

2.) Type: whereis ndiswrapper loadndisdriver wlan_radio_averatec_5110hx (hit enter). This verifies the installation of user space utilities

3.) Type: /usr/sbin/ndiswrapper -i /home/djmuk/BCMWL5.INF (Case sensitive, if file: 'BCMWL5.INF' is in capitals in /home/djmuk/ then use capitals here)

4.) Type: ndiswrapper -l <-- That's the letter 'L' by the way (not the number one). This verifies the installation of the Windows driver

5.) Type: /sbin/modprobe ndiswrapper (hit enter)

6.) Type: ndiswrapper -m (hit enter)

7.) Type: /sbin/dhclient wlan0 (This activates the wireless connection - FINALLY!)

ALL DONE!

* There is no encryption being used at the moment. I haven't ventured that far yet ;) (but I will do when I get some sleep)

You should also note, that if you reboot your machine, you might notice there's no Internet connection.

To fix this, when you log in to the system, immediately open up the terminal and type the last command (Step 3: Part 7): (/sbin/dhclient wlan0). I'm sure there's a way to initiate this upon Start Up - but I'm still a n00b at Linux.

I hope this becomes useful for someone :)

Edited by markjensen

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Excellent HOWTO on ndiswrapper! (Y)

We have been needing this for a while. Good work!

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Enabling Encryption

Introduction

Alrighty then, Part 2 of this tutorial. The first part has no encryption (meaning, your Wireless Access Point has all security features disabled. Now it's time to enable them (after a few hours of research on google).

I'm going to write this tutorial based upon my own settings (feel free to change them).

My Relevant Specs & Info

- Fedora Core 3 (aka Red Hat 12)

- Kernel 2.6.10-1.760 (works with previous kernels, including *.770 and 2.6.11)

- Linksys WMP54G Wireless Network Card (Version 2)

- Linksys WAP54G Wireless-G Access Point (IP Address example used in browser: 192.168.2.2)

Step 1: Setup and Auto-Start on Reboot

1.) Copy & Paste the text below into a text editor (eg, "gedit"):

# NDIS Wrapper Configuration: Linksys WMP54G
 DEVICE=wlan0
 ONBOOT=yes
 BOOTPROTO=dhcp
 TYPE=Wireless
 MODE=Managed
 SSID="DjmUK_54G"
 CHANNEL=11
 USERCTL=yes
 PEERDNS=no
 KEY=xxxxxxxxx
 RATE=Auto
 NICK=wlan0

2.) Save the file to: /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ with the filename: ifcfg-wlan0.

Step 2: Editing File: ifcfg-wlan0

1.) Editing the file. Firstly open up your Access Point into a browser http://192.168.2.2 (I used my WinXP box to do this). The important settings to change (just copy the settings you see in your browser):

- SSID="DjmUK_54G"

This is the name of your wireless network which MUST match your Access Points SSID

- CHANNEL=11

Depends on your location, I use 11 because I'm in Europe

- KEY=XXXXXXXXXX

Take a look at your 'Security Settings', I'm using a 'Security Mode of WEP @ 64-bits / 10 hex digits' (because 128-bit slows down the network). Type in your key here, NOT the passphrase! the generated key. I had four to choose from, so I made sure I was broadcasting the chosen key

- RATE=Auto

You can change this to your actual bandwidth (eg, 54G), but auto is the easiest method that works just fine with me

Step 3: Network Settings and Network Restart

1.) In Fedora, go to "Start > System Settings > Network", and in the DNS Tab:

- Hostname: localhost Unless you're a web server

- Primary DNS: 192.168.1.1 Your Gateway address (your Access Point via a browser will tell you this)

- Secondary DNS:

- Tertiary DNS:

- DNS Search Path:

* I left some fields blank above because I'm not running a web server so I don't need to worry about those.

2.) Restart your network, and you have two options to do this.

-- In 'Terminal' you can type: service network restart

-- Network Configuration (Decativate device, Activate device).

3.) Now test it all. Load up any web page ;)

ALL DONE!

The above works for me, so hopefully it will work for someone else out there and hopefully with little to no modifications.

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Kernel Updates Broke My Network Connections

Introduction

Okay, this is my last article on this subject (all this Linux is a nice learning curve, and I'm still learning).

Basically, I just upgraded my kernel (via yums rpm):

From: 2.6.10-1.760

To: 2.6.10-1.770

However, on reboot the Internet was broken. But don't worry, you don't need to go through all these steps again because the hardware is installed and configured correctly.

My Relevant Specs & Info

- Fedora Core 3 (aka Red Hat 12)

- Kernel 2.6.10-1.770 <-- NEW VERSION BABY!

- Linksys WMP54G Wireless Network Card (Version 2)

- Linksys WAP54G Wireless-G Access Point

Step 1: Why Is It Broken?

1.) Because that ndiswrapper module you compiled and installed was for the previous kernel, so you're gonna' have to recompile a new one - and that's all there is to it.

2.) "Step 2: Installation (Part 1/2)" needs to be followed - but not in so much detail, so here goes.

Step 2: Recompiling

Let's say you've kept the ndiswrapper folder in your user space /home/djmuk/ (if not, then go sort it out by un-tar'ing it etc.)

01.) Load up the terminal

02.) Type: su

03.) Type: cd /home/djmuk/ndiswrapper-1.0/ Or wherever you've un-tar'ed the ndiswraper module

04.) Type: make

05.) Type: make install

06.) Type: ndiswrapper -l Note the name of the driver (in my case 'bcmwl5')

07.) Type: ndiswrapper -e bcmwl5 This removes that driver (so watch your spelling)

08.) Type: /usr/sbin/ndiswrapper -i /home/djmuk/BCMWL5.INF reinstalls the driver

09.) Type: ndiswrapper -l Verification

10.) Type: /sbin/modprobe ndiswrapper

11.) Type: ndiswrapper -m

12.) Type: /sbin/dhclient wlan0

13.) Type: service network restart

ALL DONE!

There we go, just a simple case of recompiling the ndiswrapper module for your new kernel, and reinstalling the module. All your previous settings and configurations (including encryption) are still intact.

Edited by markjensen

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I would like to offer another alternative to using ndiswrapper, called madwifi. I find it is much faster and more convenient especially when theres security keys involved.

It *should* work on any card that uses an atheros chipset.

This worked for me on fedora core 3 770 with a WPC55AG card:

1. get the madwifi drivers and libradies:

http://dl.atrpms.net/production/packages/f...fc3.at.i686.rpm

http://download.atrpms.net/production/pack...fc3.at.i386.rpm

2. install the rpms:

at terminal:

cd /download_location/

su

rpm -i madwifi-kmdl-2.6.10-1.770_FC3-0.9.4.12-15.rhfc3.at.i686.rpm

rpm -i madwifi-0.9.4.12-15.rhfc3.at.i386.rpm

cd /sbin

./modprobe ath_pci

3. configure your card the way you want it:

most configurations can use the built-in network config utility:

-open it up, and click to create a new device config.

-select you options for ip, dhcp, etc

-select "managed" mode

-select any othe config you need, like WEP key, if you use one.

-save

-restart "network" from applications>system settings>server settings>services

if you use a WEP key in an open system, i have found that the built in configurator has problems since it specifies "restricted" as the authentication mode, so you can do this:

-go to a terminal:

su

cd /sbin

./ifconfig ath0 up

./iwconfig ath0 key open [1] 7E0355BA7E

./dhclient ath0

you can stick all this stuff in a script or something if you want.

This config gives me fast authentication and good speed (it correctly uses 54Mb/s when available)

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Here is a nice guide on how to get ndiswrapper working with *all* linux distros \

You must have the wireless tools installed

1: extract tar (kernel 2.4.* or lower needs ndiswrapper .12)

2: cd /path/to/ndiswrapper/source

3: make

4: su

5. make install

6. modprobe nidwrapper

7. ndiswrapper -i /path/to/win/driver

8. ndiswrapper -l [check that hardware is present]

9. iwconfig (make sure you see the card)

10. ndiswrapper -m

11. iwlist wlan0 scan (shows wireless networks (essid))

12. iwconfig wlan0 mode [network mode usually] managed

13. Then run dhcpcd wlan0

key [encription key] 48143525698

essid [network name] DLink

so you might have

iwconfig wlan0 mode managed

iwconfig wlan0 key 4812534656

iwconfig wlan0 essid DLink

How to get ndiswrapper working on startup:

There are many ways but theres nothing that exact. Different Distros have their way, but you can make a script in /etc/rc.d/rc.wlan0 and then have a some file call it

My /etc/rc.d/wlan0 looks like

#!/bin/sh
#/etc/rc.d/wlan0
echo "Starting Wireless Networking....."
modprobe ndiswrapper
sleep 1
iwconfig wlan0 mode Managed
iwconfig wlan0 essid DLink
sleep 1
dhcpcd wlan0
echo "Wireless Networking Started!"

At this time I'm working on remaking my script work better like to search for a network before it sets the essid etc...

Hope you found this useful

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Didn't I already do this :huh:

Slightly more detailed and specifically for FC3, but reports show that it works on a lot of distros out there:

[HOW TO] Fedora 3: Installing Wireless Networking

Well, we now have two tutorials - if one doesn't work then the other's bound to :rolleyes:

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Didn't I already do this :huh:

Slightly more detailed and specifically for FC3, but reports show that it works on a lot of distros out there:

[HOW TO] Fedora 3: Installing Wireless Networking

Well, we now have two tutorials - if one doesn't work then the other's bound to  :rolleyes:

585656664[/snapback]

Well kinda mine short a sweet

and it tells how to load the connection at startup using a script important to gentoo, slack, arch, maybe debian

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Both of those procedures could be useful, and since they augment and compliment each other, let me merge them into one larger thread for people to go to when they are looking for a guide. (Y)

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Good idea markjensen, 3 ways of installing wireless networking - so now there can be no problems at all, because everyone can be satisfied :)

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This thread is awesome. Time to start pointing people who ask me about this on IRC and IM to it!

Great work all who wrote guides (Y)

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This method works with Mandrake 10.1 (after the usual false starts and dinking around). Step 7 isn't applicable (command not available), but the Mandrake configuration utility allows you to configure and start the network connection. Thanks very much!

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Awesome guide... very easy reading and gets my wireless card working in no time :yes:

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Thanks for the guides! Neowin's Linux forums are getting to be a great source of Linux information. :)

Keep up the good work (Y)

Edited by hornett

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Nice guide, thanks a lot. Shame though we have to go through all this - a regular user won't be able to handle that :no:

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Nice guide, thanks a lot. Shame though we have to go through all this - a regular user won't be able to handle that  :no:

585689939[/snapback]

Well it's all about the 1st, 5th & 6th posts. The 2nd & 3rd are optional extras. Just follow either #1, #5 or #6 and that's all you'll need to get online (as long as basic security isn't an issue).

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What about WPA encryption settings!? This guide bases on WEP encryption, which anybody can crack within 5 hours.. :pinch:

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What about WPA encryption settings!? This guide bases on WEP encryption, which anybody can crack within 5 hours..  :pinch:

585690394[/snapback]

Some drivers are supported by wpa-supplicant, which is configured through a separate config file.

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What about WPA encryption settings!? This guide bases on WEP encryption, which anybody can crack within 5 hours..  :pinch:

585690394[/snapback]

WPA - hmm, never looked into that. I've always gone with WEP (because I know how to), but I'll have to look into WPA encryption sometime, once I've researched into 'which is more secure'.

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I would like to offer another alternative to using ndiswrapper, called madwifi.  I find it is much faster and more convenient especially when theres security keys involved.

It *should* work on any card that uses an atheros chipset.

This worked for me on fedora core 3 770 with a WPC55AG card:

1. get the madwifi drivers and libradies:

http://dl.atrpms.net/production/packages/f...fc3.at.i686.rpm

http://download.atrpms.net/production/pack...fc3.at.i386.rpm

2. install the rpms:

at terminal:

cd /download_location/

su

rpm -i madwifi-kmdl-2.6.10-1.770_FC3-0.9.4.12-15.rhfc3.at.i686.rpm

rpm -i madwifi-0.9.4.12-15.rhfc3.at.i386.rpm

cd /sbin

./modprobe ath_pci

3. configure your card the way you want it:

most configurations can use the built-in network config utility:

-open it up, and click to create a new device config.

-select you options for ip, dhcp, etc

-select "managed" mode

-select any othe config you need, like WEP key, if you use one.

-save

-restart "network" from applications>system settings>server settings>services

if you use a WEP key in an open system, i have found that the built in configurator has problems since it specifies "restricted" as the authentication mode, so you can do this:

-go to a terminal:

su

cd /sbin

./ifconfig ath0 up

./iwconfig ath0 key open [1] 7E0355BA7E

./dhclient ath0

you can stick all this stuff in a script or something if you want.

This config gives me fast authentication and good speed (it correctly uses 54Mb/s when available)

585637315[/snapback]

Thank you so much for this. This made my wireless work flawlessly on my Toshiba laptop! GREAT JOB!

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Thanks for the heads up. I'll give it a shot once I get the wireless networking card.

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One thing that ive never figured out ( until recently )how to get working was WPA Supplicant with NDIS Wrapper to load automatically on boot.

Open up the interfaces file in

/etc/network/interfaces

Make sure you have these lines in there

auto wlan0
iface wlan0 inet dhcp
pre-up /usr/sbin/wpa_supplicant -Bw -Dndiswrapper -iwlan0 -c/etc/wpa_supplicant.conf
post-down killall -q wpa_supplicant

Just thought I'd add that, would have made my life soo much freaking easier if I knew how to set that up from the start.

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I think I figured out how to get my WLAN working, but not set for automatic startup and was setup with the native drivers instead of ndiswrapper. I noted that quite a few WLAN cards include the Linux drivers, but arc4 and/or crc32 are required. Those crypto modules can be found in /lib/modules/(your kernel version)/kernel/crypto. But if only I could find out how to get it to work for automatic startup and find a GUI WLAN monitor, I'd be all set and then, I'd be able to post a HOWTO on that.

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Thanks alot :)

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DjmUK:

I'm having a problem with Part 7 on Step 2 of the first post of this topic. I'm extremely new to Linux and have Fedora Core 4. I'm trying to get my Linux card to work on this thing. I do an lspci and come up with the following (just for the sake of having posted as much info as possible)

00:0a.0 Network controller: Broadcom Corporation BCM4306 802.11 b/g Wireless LAN Controller (rev03)

So I go to do this install on my nix box and get to this part

[root@localhost ndiswrapper-1.2]#

and type in the word 'make' to get something along the following output (I had to write it down seeing as how I have no net connection).

make -C driver

make [1]: Entering directory /root/Desktop/ndiswrapper-1.2/driver'

Can't find kernel sources in /lib/modules/2.6.11-1.1369_FC4/build;

give the path to kernel sources with KSRC=<path> argument to make

make[1]: *** [prereq_check] Error 1

make[1]: Leaving directory '/root/Desktop/ndiswrapper-1.2/driver'

make: ***[all]Error 2

[root@localhost ndiswrapper-1.2]#

Someone please tell me what this means? Why am I getting an error?

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