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DiskMax 4


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#1 K.John

K.John

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  • OS: Windows 8
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Posted 09 April 2009 - 19:43

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DiskMax is a windows performance maintenance software used by novices and experts alike. Novices because it guides them with a detailed help file and helpful prompts. Experts because it automates all those tedious tasks for you.

DiskMax 4 has been reviewed by members at other technology forums and has over 800 installs from Sunday (5Apr09). Over 40,000 if you take count from a 2-3 years back. It's user base growth has been rapidly increasing pace since version 4 released a month back and I thought it's now good enough for the discerning crowd at neowin.

If you take CCleaner as the benchmark, DiskMax does everything it does (except the registry cleaning and software uninstalling) and more. An unique feature not seen in any software application till date is the ability to clean out Windows Event Logs. It basically clears out the standard junk file locations (including other user profiles on the same system - if you are an admin and you specify it), deep scans your drives, cleans out your event logs, defragments your drives and rearranges key files based on prefetch data collected by Windows.

Official features list and download location: http://www.koshyjohn...re/diskmax.html
Additional information (help file as a separate download for review; only on neowin): http://koshyjohnuk.g....com/dmhelp.chm

DiskMax is listed on Softpedia: http://www.softpedia...g/DiskMax.shtml
Please digg it when :p you find it to your liking: http://digg.com/soft...nce_Maintenance

Posted Image

I greatly attribute DiskMax's sudden popularity spurt to it being picked up by tech bloggers at other forums. I'd be much obliged if DiskMax was shared around by bloggers who are reading this and decide they like the program. It's a small way of showing that my work is appreciated and deserves a wider audience. Thank you.

Edited by Koshy John, 14 April 2009 - 17:38.



#2 OP K.John

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Posted 10 April 2009 - 07:05

It just got approved at Download.com:
http://download.cnet...4-10912587.html

#3 simmo

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Posted 10 April 2009 - 10:22

Wow...I really recommend this.

Has a lovley interface and its only 700KB in size. But would love the option to have a standalone .exe instead of installing it though :p

Anyway...it cleared 700MB of junk on my system which CCleaner missed.

thumbs up!

#4 +Xinok

Xinok

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Posted 10 April 2009 - 11:51

Never, never, NEVER delete files by extension!!! Some programmers don't always use appropriate file extensions, and some programs can stop working if these files are deleted.

#5 OP K.John

K.John

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Posted 10 April 2009 - 14:59

Never, never, NEVER delete files by extension!!! Some programmers don't always use appropriate file extensions, and some programs can stop working if these files are deleted.


Noted. However, deleting files by extension is an optional feature that is never executed without first prompting the user. The extensions under consideration are: old, prv, chk, gid, wbk, tmp, dmp, nch, log, bak

Any programmer worth his salt would never create an important file with these extensions. Exceptions are setup.log, install.log, OPA*.bak - DiskMax makes allowance for these files and skips them. And this procedure has never caused problems for any of the 40,000+ users who have used DiskMax over the past 2-3 years (at least it was never brought to my notice).

To address your concerns, I have updated the program to include an additional prompt asking the user whether he/she wants to delete deep scan identified files to the recycle bin. Is this satisfactory?

Wow...I really recommend this.

Has a lovley interface and its only 700KB in size. But would love the option to have a standalone .exe instead of installing it though :p

Anyway...it cleared 700MB of junk on my system which CCleaner missed.

thumbs up!

Thanks for the positive response! There was another user who was able to get rid of 15GB of junk from a Windows 7 installation.
Here's his take: http://www.pallab.ne...e-with-diskmax/

It's actually only 500KB - 200KB's from the bundled help file.
I have shied away from a standalone exe because it is not very professional - DiskMax 3 was and continues to be a standalone however.

Edited by Koshy John, 10 April 2009 - 15:26.


#6 i_was_here

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Posted 10 April 2009 - 18:12

Can DiskMax clean multiple profiles at once or only the current user?

#7 OP K.John

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Posted 10 April 2009 - 18:39

Can DiskMax clean multiple profiles at once or only the current user?

Multiple user profiles. But DiskMax must be running with administrative privileges (manual elevation is necessary if UAC is enabled - right click and select 'run as administrator') for this to be available and you have to confirm your intentions for each user (at least the first time).

Basically you can pick and choose which profiles you want to scan through.

#8 +Xinok

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Posted 10 April 2009 - 18:49

Noted. However, deleting files by extension is an optional feature that is never executed without first prompting the user. The extensions under consideration are: old, prv, chk, gid, wbk, tmp, dmp, nch, log, bak

Any programmer worth his salt would never create an important file with these extensions. Exceptions are setup.log, install.log, OPA*.bak - DiskMax makes allowance for these files and skips them. And this procedure has never caused problems for any of the 40,000+ users who have used DiskMax over the past 2-3 years (at least it was never brought to my notice).

To address your concerns, I have updated the program to include an additional prompt asking the user whether he/she wants to delete deep scan identified files to the recycle bin. Is this satisfactory?

That's safer, but it can still break programs. Almost every file extension has more than one use, even obvious ones like tmp.

http://filext.com/file-extension/prv
http://filext.com/file-extension/chk
http://filext.com/file-extension/gid
http://filext.com/file-extension/wbk
http://filext.com/file-extension/tmp
http://filext.com/file-extension/dmp
etc.

Something that might be safe, instead of scanning the entire drive, only scan specific folders. For example, the Windows folder is unlikely to have files from other programs and deleting these file types from that folder should be safe.

Sometimes, even high quality commercial software can crash. A long time ago, I had problems with Diskeeper crashing and trying to reinstall itself. It turns out it was only because I was deleting a LOG file used by Diskeeper.

#9 OP K.John

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Posted 13 April 2009 - 12:51

That's safer, but it can still break programs. Almost every file extension has more than one use, even obvious ones like tmp.

http://filext.com/file-extension/prv
http://filext.com/file-extension/chk
http://filext.com/file-extension/gid
http://filext.com/file-extension/wbk
http://filext.com/file-extension/tmp
http://filext.com/file-extension/dmp
etc.

Something that might be safe, instead of scanning the entire drive, only scan specific folders. For example, the Windows folder is unlikely to have files from other programs and deleting these file types from that folder should be safe.

Sometimes, even high quality commercial software can crash. A long time ago, I had problems with Diskeeper crashing and trying to reinstall itself. It turns out it was only because I was deleting a LOG file used by Diskeeper.

Are you suggesting that the feature be removed completely?

The way I see it, the user is sufficiently warned that there is a remote chance that a deep scan may cause problems in unprofessionally written programs. They also get to delete files to the recycle bin so that they can check if anything's amiss before they get rid of the junk files for good.

The next step would be to remove the feature completely but that would be a disservice to those who want to use it.

#10 +Xinok

Xinok

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Posted 13 April 2009 - 17:46

Are you suggesting that the feature be removed completely?

The way I see it, the user is sufficiently warned that there is a remote chance that a deep scan may cause problems in unprofessionally written programs. They also get to delete files to the recycle bin so that they can check if anything's amiss before they get rid of the junk files for good.

The next step would be to remove the feature completely but that would be a disservice to those who want to use it.

If you won't remove the feature, then you should at least provide a better warning.

The first screen gives absolutely no warning.
Capture000.png

Only the second screen warns the user, but from here, the files will be deleted regardless if you click Yes or No.
Capture001.png

(The yellow borders were put there by Sandboxie)

#11 OP K.John

K.John

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Posted 14 April 2009 - 17:47

If you won't remove the feature, then you should at least provide a better warning.

The first screen gives absolutely no warning.

Only the second screen warns the user, but from here, the files will be deleted regardless if you click Yes or No.

(The yellow borders were put there by Sandboxie)

Thank you for taking the time to provide feedback like you are. I really appreciate it.
In my haste to come up with a workable solution, I overlooked what you just pointed out.

I have decided to explore alternative approaches to implementing this feature more professionally. This may take a little time but I'll explain in detail my final approach once I've settled on it.

#12 OP K.John

K.John

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Posted 16 April 2009 - 15:37

Changes made on 16th April 2009
1. Text in the first deep scan prompt changed to: "WARNING: Select Yes ONLY if you have read the help file. If you select 'Yes', you can choose to delete files to the recycle bin, if you wish, a little later."
2. Help file now includes following text:
"WARNING: Deep scanning your system can be a useful feature only if you know what you are doing. It is highly recommended that you choose to delete files to the recycle bin when prompted so that you can restore files selectively if you find that an application requires any of them.

The files with the extensions listed above are by definition temporary files. Any application that attaches anything more than a passing importance to these files are simply badly written. But badly written applications do exist, and therefore, this warning."


Support for Windows XP/2003 implemented and tested. DiskMax 3 discontinued.

#13 ViZioN

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    Resident Scotsman

  • Joined: 17-January 05
  • Location: Edinburgh

Posted 16 April 2009 - 15:57

Cool little app :) Ran the standard setup but didn't deep scan and managed to save 200MB. Not bad at all. Well done!

#14 soldier1st

soldier1st

    Software Tester/Tech/Linux Lover

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Posted 17 April 2009 - 08:15

Question to the maker of the app... why would you want to delete the stuff in the event logs? it makes no sense to me but perhaps you can explain it in better detail.

#15 OP K.John

K.John

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Posted 19 April 2009 - 17:04

Question to the maker of the app... why would you want to delete the stuff in the event logs? it makes no sense to me but perhaps you can explain it in better detail.

Event logs are perpetually maintained as long as the Windows Event Log service is running.

The more the number of entries in each event log:
- the larger is the space occupied on your hard disk.
- the slower (very marginally; but noticeable on systems with old Windows installations) each write to an event log is.

It is also prudent to clear your event logs for privacy purposes. Open event viewer to see the tens of thousands of entries you are likely to have accumulated if your event logs have never been cleared.



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