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Software engineering vs. Computer Engineering/Science


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#16 -KJ

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 23:24

Why'd you revive this thread?

Anyway, it's pretty typical that software engineers will make a higher salary, and are more likely to transfer into management due to the background.


Advices like his are always welcome.


#17 marasista

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 15:20

First of all, I'm a UW grad ('08 CS) and I have friends (and have worked with people) from each of the three programs. I highly recommend going there since you'll have a very good chance of getting a good job post graduation. I know people at Amazon, MS, nVidia, Google, etc. The cost isn't an issue after the first year since co-op helps massively. After first year, I paid 100% of the cost of my education, and saved some, and bought a nice laptop (amongst other crap), without working while studying.

Now, as for the three programs, they're somewhat different, but overlap a lot. Computer Science (what I graduated from) places a lot of emphasis on theory. A fair bit of math (calculus, linear algebra, stats, etc) is involved. Software Engineering (SE) trades some of the math and theory for good engineering practices. Think design, project management, and ethics (pfft). Computer Engineering (CE) is like SE, but places more emphasis on hardware. However, there is a lot of software in CE, but you'll approach it from a hardware perspective. Think assembly, C/C++, verilog. Now, as from post-grad jobs, the major tech companies will hire people from any of the three. I've found Google hires more engineering students than CSers, but it varies from company to company.

The choice boils down to:
- Do you like software + math, theory: Computer Science (what I did)
- Do you like hardware: Computer Engineering (what I should have done)
- Do you like software + desire to manage/do rigorous design: Software Engineering

Feel free to PM me if you have any specific questions about UW or the co-op program (which is a requirement in engineering at UW).




Hey . i really want to know the difference between comp eng and software eng .
Which course are less to maths .
Which course are offered by better salary in today's rat race world .
Let me know the total difference between this two cause i'm currently struggling choosing between this 2 courses .
Really giving me headache . Help me out guys .
Do

#18 marasista

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 15:20

First of all, I'm a UW grad ('08 CS) and I have friends (and have worked with people) from each of the three programs. I highly recommend going there since you'll have a very good chance of getting a good job post graduation. I know people at Amazon, MS, nVidia, Google, etc. The cost isn't an issue after the first year since co-op helps massively. After first year, I paid 100% of the cost of my education, and saved some, and bought a nice laptop (amongst other crap), without working while studying.

Now, as for the three programs, they're somewhat different, but overlap a lot. Computer Science (what I graduated from) places a lot of emphasis on theory. A fair bit of math (calculus, linear algebra, stats, etc) is involved. Software Engineering (SE) trades some of the math and theory for good engineering practices. Think design, project management, and ethics (pfft). Computer Engineering (CE) is like SE, but places more emphasis on hardware. However, there is a lot of software in CE, but you'll approach it from a hardware perspective. Think assembly, C/C++, verilog. Now, as from post-grad jobs, the major tech companies will hire people from any of the three. I've found Google hires more engineering students than CSers, but it varies from company to company.

The choice boils down to:
- Do you like software + math, theory: Computer Science (what I did)
- Do you like hardware: Computer Engineering (what I should have done)
- Do you like software + desire to manage/do rigorous design: Software Engineering

Feel free to PM me if you have any specific questions about UW or the co-op program (which is a requirement in engineering at UW).




Hey . i really want to know the difference between comp eng and software eng .
Which course are less to maths .
Which course are offered by better salary in today's rat race world .
Let me know the total difference between this two cause i'm currently struggling choosing between this 2 courses .
Really giving me headache . Help me out guys .
Do

#19 aftas

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 03:42

?


While the topic is at hand, what is the difference between these three?

#20 Bengal34

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 03:54

?


While the topic is at hand, what is the difference between these three?


computer engineering is hardware and the other two are software.

edit:// computer engineers can earn up to 70k with a BS

#21 Soulsiphon

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 04:01

You'll want a current software engineering course - always. For my BS in Computer Science, software engineering was just another 'concentration' under the major, and I as a smartguy decided to take the 'fun' path and study game graphics programming. Not only is game programming an extremely difficult field to break in to, you throw everything you've previously learned about software design and spend every moment of your coding time seeking the fastest possible way to accomplish a given task regardless of whether it's 'sexy' or up to standard practices. Besides that, it was a lot of low-level instructions shared between C and in-line x86 ASM so had absolutely no practical use in the real world software engineering/design jobs as I was about to find out.

The software engineering concentration in my university studied software design principles incorporating things like Oracle and general DB design/implementation at the application level, software design patterns (GoF etc), and enterprise-level architecture through J2EE IIRC.

When I entered the workforce armed with my game programming tricks, I had my arse handed to me by the guys that had studied the latter above :)

#22 gian

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 08:59

I'd suggest you take the Computer science route as you already know how to program "in the real world". It will improve your skills and decisions when it comes to coding. There should be a software engineering course or 2 in there which teaches you models used applied in real world.

#23 WelshBluebird

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 09:12

Computer Science (what I graduated from) places a lot of emphasis on theory. A fair bit of math (calculus, linear algebra, stats, etc) is involved. Software Engineering (SE) trades some of the math and theory for good engineering practices. Think design, project management, and ethics (pfft).


Perhaps its different over here in the UK then.
While my CS course does coover a lot of theory (maths etc), it has also covered design, project management, ethics and software development in general.

The software engineering concentration in my university studied software design principles incorporating things like Oracle and general DB design/implementation at the application level, software design patterns (GoF etc), and enterprise-level architecture through J2EE IIRC.


Again, I've covered pretty much all of that in my CS course.

I think you have to just look at the specifics per university / college. Some will have courses that are named slightly differently but cover the same thing, and some will have courses named the same but that cover different things. So just have a look around on the internet to see.

#24 Astra.Xtreme

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 09:20

This might actually be a valuable resource for anybody wondering about CE vs. SE.

Here's the academic catalog at the university I attend: http://www.msoe.edu/...grad2010-11.pdf
Computer Engineering starts on page 116
Software Engineering starts on page 140.

Just as a side note, my university runs on a trimester system which is really rare, so most people wouldn't take this many classes. It does give a good description for what each major entails. And course descriptions are towards the end of the .pdf
I did two years of the CE program and then switched to EE since I didn' t much care for the magnitude of programming.

Hopefully this helps. :)

#25 aftas

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 14:37

computer engineering is hardware and the other two are software.

edit:// computer engineers can earn up to 70k with a BS

Well the money aside, Ive always wanted to be focused on hardware so I guess computer engineering is my sort of thing. Thanks :)

#26 Astra.Xtreme

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 18:25

Well the money aside, Ive always wanted to be focused on hardware so I guess computer engineering is my sort of thing. Thanks :)


Just so you know, computer engineering is a little bit of hardware, but not much. Though it's probably different for every university.

I'd recommend Electrical Engineering if you want to specialize in more hardware. That's what I did and it was magnitudes better than CE (in my opinion).

#27 Tiburon

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Posted 09 December 2010 - 04:34

If you can get "Software Engineering" or take classes in it, do so.

Regular programming/CS is too easy to offshore.

#28 Soulsiphon

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Posted 09 December 2010 - 04:56

After further thought, embedded systems is a pretty cool field to get into too. Had a senior seminar in embedded code/x86 ASM code and we got to do a few projects using Lego Mindstorm sets muahahaha :blush:

total geek addon here; so how the x86 ASM and C tied into this is that there is a replacement ROM (soft) that you can flash to the Mindstorms main logic controller - I'm sorry the name of the project escapes me as it's been years. But then, there is a dev package that allows you to write C code and compile it into Mindstorm executable code and load it onto the Mindstorm controllers :) pretty cool actually.