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#31 hdood

hdood

    Neowinian Senior

  • Joined: 25-February 04

Posted 10 May 2010 - 08:16

What's your point? Find me a 7 pages or more thread about how to wait for any key in a .NET console program, and you'll have made a valid comparison.

You're being your typical dishonest self. Nothing new under the sun. I looked, and there are threads about people wanting to know how to do it in .NET (even though the ratio of C/C++ to .NET programmers, especially for console stuff, is probably 100,000:1) . As for "7 pages or more," not all 7 pages of that thread of yours is on topic.

The problem is not that beginners don't know how to do basic things, it's that even experienced programmers can't provide a simple working solution on which they would all agree.

Bull. The answer on Windows is two lines that all experienced console programmers know, on Linux it's a few more, but all experienced Linux console programmers know. The problem is exactly that beginners don't know how to do basic things (and also that the web is full of people that just want to argue about things rather than provide an answer, if they even know it), and I see threads with people having trouble solving simple problems in .NET everywhere.


#32 OP Andre S.

Andre S.

    Asik

  • Tech Issues Solved: 12
  • Joined: 26-October 05

Posted 10 May 2010 - 14:57

You're being your typical dishonest self. Nothing new under the sun.

:rofl: I post some useful beginner info and ask for improvements and content; so far you've managed to question my honesty, my reading comprehension skills and my understanding of the difference between a language and a library (seriously, wtf), as well as provide some sky-high, semantical criticism about how I lump together languages and programming environments when that's pretty clearly my intent (talk about reading comprehension). The FAQ states C++ is "Complex at the outset: hard to learn, hard to master", a statement most C++ programmers would agree with, nothing more, nothing less; rather than bickering about stuff you know we both know, be rude and waste my time, why not help make this FAQ happen?

#33 code_ninja

code_ninja

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  • Joined: 14-November 08

Posted 10 May 2010 - 19:00

Tutorials:
theForger's Windows GUI Programming
FunctionX Tutorials (also has C#, VB, etc. tuts)

Documentation:
Original MSDN Documentation

Books:
Visual C++ Windows Shell Programming by Dino Esposito (A little outdated)
Programming Windows 5th edition by Charles Petzold

Programs:
Dev-Cpp IDE
Resource Editor


For the Mac:
Xcode

For Linux:
I use a standard text editor and gcc. No need for an IDE.

#34 OP Andre S.

Andre S.

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Posted 10 May 2010 - 19:04

[snip]

Thanks ! :D Will review and add asap.

#35 code_ninja

code_ninja

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  • Joined: 14-November 08

Posted 11 May 2010 - 00:03

More Linux stuff:
Official Gtk+ Tutorial
X Windows System Programming (Advanced)
Xlib Beginner's Tutorial
LinuxMafia.com's list of IDEs

Cross-Platform:
Zetcode Tutorials
Qt Product Page
Qt Documentation
(I would definitely recommend Qt for OS X GUI programming)

Game Programming:
LazyFoo's SDL Tutorials

Overall Tutorials:
Free online C/C++ tutorials
Free online C# tutorials and references

Compilers:
The Free Country compiler list

I'll post more later.

#36 OP Andre S.

Andre S.

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Posted 11 May 2010 - 13:27

Will be at least another 24 hours before I can update, sorry.

#37 vetColin-uk

Colin-uk

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Posted 11 May 2010 - 13:36

nice thread.

pinned :p

#38 OP Andre S.

Andre S.

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Posted 13 May 2010 - 03:39

Added some general links and some books. Specific APIs like Win32, Qt, SDL etc. will probably get their own section eventually, although maybe they would be better in a separate FAQ if this gets too long. Also I really can't recommend Dev-C++ for the reasons this blogger mentioned in 2008, which are all the more relevant 2 years later. In fact since despite its problems it is still often recommended, I will explicitely warn against it.

#39 App0x

App0x

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  • Joined: 29-June 10

Posted 29 June 2010 - 22:45

C++:
All the advantages of C plus support for objects and generics, and better standard library
Essential skill for any game programming position and in a wide array of domains
Complex at the outset: hard to learn, hard to master
Like C, it is mainly designed as a systems programming language


I don't agree with red statements, because for system programming, is important to use C language, it belongs group of low level languages.
C is used for write OS kernel. So C++ isn't used for mainly system programming, it's used for system programming, yes but not for OS kernel.
In my opinion C++ is used on already written OS.
-----------------------
you know, i think that C# isn't powerful language yet :|
Some people thinks that C# have replaced C++, that not suited for truth.
if you want to become actual programmer you have to throw C# now.Get one of the best powerful programming language C++, Python.
-----
P.S This is my second post.

#40 OP Andre S.

Andre S.

    Asik

  • Tech Issues Solved: 12
  • Joined: 26-October 05

Posted 01 July 2010 - 08:24

C++ shares the same design goals as C because it is basically a superset of it. It's C, with added features (which mesh more less well with C's limitations and compilation model).

While C# doesn't "replace" C++, it is widely used and often seen as a requirement for job listings. Where I work, most of the tools are developed in C#.

#41 White Cuban

White Cuban

    Shooting back in slooooo....

  • Joined: 06-August 08
  • Location: Israel, Moving Arround

Posted 04 September 2010 - 15:31

I don't agree with red statements, because for system programming, is important to use C language, it belongs group of low level languages.
C is used for write OS kernel. So C++ isn't used for mainly system programming, it's used for system programming, yes but not for OS kernel.
In my opinion C++ is used on already written OS.
-----------------------
you know, i think that C# isn't powerful language yet :|
Some people thinks that C# have replaced C++, that not suited for truth.
if you want to become actual programmer you have to throw C# now.Get one of the best powerful programming language C++, Python.
-----
P.S This is my second post.


I disagree with your disagreement about his last statement, C is very commonly used for micro controller programming, which i think is what he meant, as well as Operating system Basics building blocks.

#42 White Cuban

White Cuban

    Shooting back in slooooo....

  • Joined: 06-August 08
  • Location: Israel, Moving Arround

Posted 04 September 2010 - 16:13

I don't agree with red statements, because for system programming, is important to use C language, it belongs group of low level languages.
C is used for write OS kernel. So C++ isn't used for mainly system programming, it's used for system programming, yes but not for OS kernel.
In my opinion C++ is used on already written OS.
-----------------------
you know, i think that C# isn't powerful language yet :|
Some people thinks that C# have replaced C++, that not suited for truth.
if you want to become actual programmer you have to throw C# now.Get one of the best powerful programming language C++, Python.
-----
P.S This is my second post.



#43 OP Andre S.

Andre S.

    Asik

  • Tech Issues Solved: 12
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Posted 24 April 2011 - 18:58

Just added the "How to think like a computer scientist" books. As far as free CS material goes, this is golden. Someone really needs to write a C# version of the book though.

#44 Plok

Plok

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  • Joined: 04-September 04
  • Location: Slovakia, SK

Posted 12 November 2011 - 11:25

Hi,

I used to make some simple apps for my internal use, with Delphi 2007 - long time ago, obviously :)
It would seem that Delphi is now dead (i know I can still run it and compiled programs still work, but...)
Is there anything more recent, up-to-date that would be easy for a ex-Delphi user to jump on?

#45 Clearskies

Clearskies

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 12:31

Some people say that C# is a good language to learn after Delphi, I can't offer my insight on that, seeing as though I know neither. Java's always a nice language to know it'q quite ubiquitous in the corporate world. If you program for enjoyment, you should take a look at Python or Ruby; they are two very nice languages to use (and easy to pick up as well).