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julianbl

315km/h MacBook Pro drop

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scaled.php?tn=0&server=844&filename=dscn0022c.jpg&xsize=640&ysize=640

Holy cow! it's still working! My friend's Toshiba L500 was accidentally dropped on the floor and the hard disk failed instantly. Not to mention the nasty scratches

on the plastic back.

your friend's laptop was obviously running. I assume this mac wasn't

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We have several ideas in mind:

A couple of month ago, another guy from work left his macbook 13 (unibody but not pro) on on his bedroom floor, the house flooded and the motherboard died. We can try to fit this motherboard on the case of that one. I know the mothers are different (SD reader, firewire 800, etc), that's why I said TRY! hehehe

Another idea is to build a small case and use it as a HTPC... perhaps install Windows 7 and use it as a dedicated Windows Media Center PC. We wold only need a mini dp to hdmi and a MCE remote.

The last one is to sell the surviving parts: motherboard, superdrive, hdd and spare flexes.

Juli?n

PS: yes... rode = road. I don't know what happened to me... I should go back to an English course. And you can see the dirt from the "side of the road" on the power connector.

Personally I would use it as A HTPC :)

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Your friend deserves it.

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scaled.php?tn=0&server=844&filename=dscn0022c.jpg&xsize=640&ysize=640

Holy cow! it's still working! My friend's Toshiba L500 was accidentally dropped on the floor and the hard disk failed instantly. Not to mention the nasty scratches

on the plastic back.

That's crazy! Hard drives are meant to withstand a crazy amount of g's. Typically the operating shock a hard drive can withstand is about 300 g, while the non-operating shock threshold is about 900 g. These figures will vary with different drives though. I bet if your friend had a solid state hard drive it would have been okay haha!

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your friend's laptop was obviously running. I assume this mac wasn't

Don't laptop hard drives have some mechanism that protects the head from scratching platter when it's moving?

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Even though it still works, if that had been my macbook pro I'd have been pi**ed. It's still quite incredible to see the results though.

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it's pretty "Epic" for a laptop to survive as what the damage has been done! Maybe because it just use one piece of aluminium "unibody" and strong enough to cover up the damage.i guess that's why it still can boot up.

While the screen wouldn't be surprise which is so thin that can easily break down!

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Impressive.... most impressive!

darth-vader.jpg

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That's crazy! Hard drives are meant to withstand a crazy amount of g's. Typically the operating shock a hard drive can withstand is about 300 g, while the non-operating shock threshold is about 900 g. These figures will vary with different drives though. I bet if your friend had a solid state hard drive it would have been okay haha!

It's more like 55g operating shock, 250g non-operating shock ;)

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cool. It's invincible!

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ohhh stupid Argentineans ..... :laugh:

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