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How to install fedora13 linux?


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#1 pearleye

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Posted 17 September 2010 - 20:43

I have windows 7 installed in my system. And now i would to install linux. Is it possible?? Coz i googled and found to have dual boot you need to install linux first and then windows 7.
Is there any way to just install fedore 13 as i have already windows 7 installed. And i am confused what kind of partition i need to have to install linux.
Now i have two partitions. C: -40gb and D: -100gb. In C: i have windows 7 installed.
Please do let me know how to install linux in a step by step process.

Thanks in advance:) Waiting for your repies :unsure:


#2 BigHoss

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Posted 17 September 2010 - 20:53

Install it in VMware
if your new to linux fedora core probably isn't a good choice

#3 -Razorfold

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Posted 17 September 2010 - 20:56

This might help: http://www.techotopi...m_(Dual_booting)

Edit: Found a better guide for you.

However, like BigHoss said Fedora isn't the easiest (or the hardest for that matter) linux to use. But if you're new, Ubuntu is a good choice. Suse is also quite simple, so if you want you can give that a shot too.

#4 Bengal34

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Posted 17 September 2010 - 21:01

Install it in VMware
if your new to linux fedora core probably isn't a good choice


This speaks volumes about the OS.

#5 OP pearleye

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 06:23

What is the difference between the Fedora Live CD(637mb) installation and Full DVD(3.1gb) installation?
I know what live CD is for but even that has a option for Install to hard drive. If i install using that CD method, is it like ill be losing some features?

#6 OP pearleye

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 06:51

This might help: http://www.techotopi...m_(Dual_booting)

Edit: Found a better guide for you.

However, like BigHoss said Fedora isn't the easiest (or the hardest for that matter) linux to use. But if you're new, Ubuntu is a good choice. Suse is also quite simple, so if you want you can give that a shot too.


Thanks a lot for that guide.. It was very clear.. Thanks again:)

#7 helios01

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 07:03

Installing Fedora after a Windows 7 installation is not hard, in fact it's quite trivial. However, once you do it overwrites your boot loader and then it's next to impossible to restore the Windows boot loader, even after uninstalling Fedora. So make sure you know what you want before you do it.

#8 -Razorfold

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 07:04

Installing Fedora after a Windows 7 installation is not hard, in fact it's quite trivial. However, once you do it overwrites your boot loader and then it's next to impossible to restore the Windows boot loader, even after uninstalling Fedora. So make sure you know what you want before you do it.

Not really, using the recovery options / console on the Windows Vista / 7 disc should fix it up.

#9 helios01

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 07:06

Not really, using the recovery options / console on the Windows Vista / 7 disc should fix it up.


I tried that many times and it did not work. I tried many other things than that, and after hours of trying, I ended up reinstalling Windows 7 which was the only thing that worked. Fortunately Windows 7 saves the old files in Windows.old but it was still painful to have to reinstall all my software.

#10 -Razorfold

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 07:11

I tried that many times and it did not work. I tried many other things than that, and after hours of trying. I ended up reinstalling Windows 7 which was the only thing that worked. Fortunately Windows 7 saves the old files in Windows.old but it was still painful to have to reinstall all my software.

Hm. A quick google search came up with stuff that said the Vista / 7 recovery tools weren't as advanced as the XP ones, but were simpler to use. Hence, they say, you need a XP disc, boot into recovery console and type "FIXMBR"

Of course I don't know if this is true or not, but its a possibility. But, I could swear that the Windows Vista / 7 recovery tools had an option to fix the MBR as well. Hm.

Also, shouldn't you still be able to boot into Windows by using GRUB and chainloading it?

#11 Soulsiphon

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 07:11

Installing Fedora after a Windows 7 installation is not hard, in fact it's quite trivial. However, once you do it overwrites your boot loader and then it's next to impossible to restore the Windows boot loader, even after uninstalling Fedora. So make sure you know what you want before you do it.


It's all trivial

EasyBCD http://neosmart.net/dl.php?id=1

#12 Unkoil

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 07:13

I tried that many times and it did not work. I tried many other things than that, and after hours of trying, I ended up reinstalling Windows 7 which was the only thing that worked. Fortunately Windows 7 saves the old files in Windows.old but it was still painful to have to reinstall all my software.



Whats so hard about it? takes me 2 minutes or less to fix it..

#13 helios01

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 07:17

Hm. A quick google search came up with stuff that said the Vista / 7 recovery tools weren't as advanced as the XP ones, but were simpler to use. Hence you would need a XP disc, boot into recovery console and type "FIXMBR"

Of course I don't know if this is true or not, but its a possibility.

Also, shouldn't you still be able to boot into Windows by using GRUB and chainloading it?


Yea I was able to boot into Windows 7 fine with GRUB, but I wanted the Windows boot loader not GRUB to start. I wanted to set it up so it'd automatically boot Windows unless I pressed otherwise. There is a program that allows simple set up of this, the name escapes me now, but it's a program specifically made for this (not free though).

However the tools in my Windows 7 disc were useless. I tried recovery and nothing, apparently Windows doesn't detect any problems and so GRUB stays. Now I only use Fedora on the school labs. It was way too much hassle getting that to work the way I wanted on my machine.

Whats so hard about it? takes me 2 minutes or less to fix it..

Could you explain how?

#14 -Razorfold

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 07:17

Yea I was able to boot into Windows 7 fine with GRUB, but I wanted the Windows boot loader not GRUB to start. I wanted to set it up so it'd automatically boot Windows unless I pressed otherwise. There is a program that allows simple set up of this, the name escapes me now, but it's a program specifically made for this (not free though).

However the tools in my Windows 7 disc were useless. I tried recovery and nothing, apparently Windows doesn't detect any problems and so GRUB stays. Now I only use Fedora on the school labs. It was way too much hassle getting that to work the way I wanted on my machine.

The only other software that I can think of is EasyBCD, and zkid2010 already mentioned that. But that's a free program so :/

#15 helios01

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Posted 18 September 2010 - 07:24

The only other software that I can think of is EasyBCD, and zkid2010 already mentioned that. But that's a free program so :/

I was thinking of DualBootPro, the program used to be free back when Vista was released and I used to have Vista and Fedora dual booting that way. After going to Win 7 and installing Fedora, it was really hard to get rid of GRUB. Maybe it's easier now.

This basically describes most of what I went through:
http://social.answer...e2-64c1ac6cce79