1 TB 2.5 inch SSD announced; will likely break most wallets

If you want to build a desktop PC that has super fast performance for, say, playing Battlefield 3, you will almost certainly want to include a solid state drive as your Windows boot drive. Are they still much more expensive to purchase than your normal mechanical platter-based hard drive? Yep. Will they continue to be more expensive for some time to come? Most likely.

However, the benefits of getting even a small 256 GB SSD inside your gaming PC rig in terms of overall performance makes a lot of sense if you have a few hundred dollars to spend.

But what if money was truly no object and you wanted to get a SSD drive that had the storage space of a top of the line mechanical hard drive? Then OCZ Technology is coming out with a product that might be to your liking. The company announced a few days ago it will release a new SSD product line called Octane. OCZ says the Octane is "the world's first SSD to achieve up to a 1 TB capacity in a compact 2.5 inch format."

Let that sink in for a moment. A 2.5" 1 TB SDD. Wow.

With that kind of storage space with a SDD solution you really don't need to have a regular hard drive anymore for storage of video and music files, like many people do when they get a smaller SSD for their PC combined with a much larger hard drive.

OCZ says that the Octane will be available starting November 1. Pricing has yet to be announced for the 1 TB version but we suspect that it won't sell for less than $2,000 considering 512 GB ones go for >$800 currently. You could easily buy an entire PC with that kind of money. However, if Bill Gates or Mark Zuckerberg is reading this article and wanting a new storage drive for their own PC, we would say, "go for it".

Image via OCZ

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34 Comments

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Man, I feel like Bill & Mark right now. I could easily spend that on a SSD, but I won't for a while yet!

Someday we'll look at the prices of these SSDs in old magazines and sales papers and laugh about how expensive they were.

Wow. As nice as this would be, I'd sooner buy a new computer... It's nice to see it continuing to advance though. Who knows what the capacities (Or price as that's a big factor) will be in a few years...

Most sources are saying that this range of drives will be priced between US$1.10 to $1.30 per GB. That's actually really good and even if we say it's $1.50 per GB, that's still only about $1500 for the 1TB drive.

Pam14160 said,
It still is out of the price range of anyone with common sense.

Not debating that, but considering this is an SSD, that's still a damn good price for the storage. It may be a worthwhile upgrade for many small businesses and even work out cheaper than various RAID arrays.

Pam14160 said,
It still is out of the price range of anyone with common sense.

Your ignorance is showing very strongly here. This is clearly not trying to target everyone. Depending on what you need it for, this kind of speed may be invaluable and worth quite a bit more to you than $2000.

My first thought was fight jet black box systems. There is a company in town that designs them, and their data transfer rate requirements are extremely high not to mention the fact that traditional mechanical hard drives wouldn't survive the stress. They could probably (not sure...but probably) replace much of their memory infrastructure with one of these bad boys and come out ahead.

Believe it or not, people have different applications than checking their email, surfing Facebook and uploading music to their iPhone.

Though with larger drives the benefit will spur prices for smaller drives to come down. You see it with standard hard disks.

what's up with the Bill Gates thing at the end? you don't need to be a billionaire to spend $2000 on a hard drive.

capr said,
what's up with the Bill Gates thing at the end? you don't need to be a billionaire to spend $2000 on a hard drive.
I think it's because a majority of the world wouldn't have $2000 to spend on a luxury device, and if they did a majority of them probably wouldn't decide to go for a SSD, instead choosing a TV or something. That's just my thinking, though.

capr said,
what's up with the Bill Gates thing at the end? you don't need to be a billionaire to spend $2000 on a hard drive.

well for 'most people' it would be plain stupid to drop $2000 on a hard drive basically. it just don't make sense unless you got A LOT of money to burn which the vast majority do not.

it's really that simple.

hell, even if i was making $100k+ a year i still doubt i would do it simply because it's pretty small upgrade for such a outrageous price when, like the article days, you could get a entire PC for that much and a very fast one at that.

so basically the article is pretty much right in the sense for someone who is sick rich (say $millions+) they could justify the $2000 since to them it don't really matter if it's $100 or $2000 since it's pocket change to them.

These are obviously application specific. If you need 1TB of data accessed at those kinds of speeds, it will be worth it to you. The amount of money you make or whatever doesn't have anything to do with the drives utility if you have specific application requirements to meet.

capr said,
what's up with the Bill Gates thing at the end? you don't need to be a billionaire to spend $2000 on a hard drive.
i was thinking the same thing, it seems a little ameturish... no offence john it was good except the last part

ThaCrip said,

well for 'most people' it would be plain stupid to drop $2000 on a hard drive basically. it just don't make sense unless you got A LOT of money to burn which the vast majority do not.

it's really that simple.

hell, even if i was making $100k+ a year i still doubt i would do it simply because it's pretty small upgrade for such a outrageous price when, like the article days, you could get a entire PC for that much and a very fast one at that.

so basically the article is pretty much right in the sense for someone who is sick rich (say $millions+) they could justify the $2000 since to them it don't really matter if it's $100 or $2000 since it's pocket change to them.

Rich people are rich because they don't spend money on this kind of things (not even celebrities and athlets would buy this thing for personal use)


Really, $2000? I'll just stick to my 2TB External HDD that I got for about £50. I've never experienced the speed increase of a SSD, so I find it difficult to justify the price of them. I can imagine that if I did see the performance increase first hand I would probably change my mind, but at those kind of prices I'm happy to be in the dark for the time being.

Intrinsica said,

Really, $2000? I'll just stick to my 2TB External HDD that I got for about £50. I've never experienced the speed increase of a SSD, so I find it difficult to justify the price of them. I can imagine that if I did see the performance increase first hand I would probably change my mind, but at those kind of prices I'm happy to be in the dark for the time being.

Sadly not all SSD drives are made the same, I have a high spec 64gb in a Dell Mini 9 running Snow Leopard. The old 5400 drive was painful but with an SSD it boots from cold to desktop in 20 seconds. I use it when I am out so dropping also becomes less of an issue.

While I would never pay 2k for a drive I can see where this could be useful, lets say database servers for one and on location video editing.

This is an extremely application specific drive. You don't need a 1TB SSD in order to benefit from SSD speed boasts. I have an 80GB ones and am using it was my system drive with some program files, and I'm only taking up 40GB. It was a huge increase in overall system responsiveness though, and well worth it IMO.

Muhammad Farrukh said,
$2000?
Seriously?
THAT is dirty cheap.
And I don't buy cheap things

Apart from hookers and booze ?