10 Petabytes of data saved by The Internet Archive

The Internet Archive has achieved an important goal in its endless quest to preserve the interconnected culture, ie a collection of 10 Petabytes of data (10,000,000,000,000,000 bytes, or 10,000,000 Gigabytes) in digital format.

The Archive, a non-profit organization devoted to “building a digital library of Internet sites and other cultural artifacts in digital form”, has recently announced the addition of the “10,000,000,000,000,000th byte” to its collection thanks to the work of supporters, volunteers and paid-staff.

The celebration for the 10 Petabytes-worth achievement included an organ performance by computer science legend Don Knuth and was almost ruined by a power blackout, the Internet Archive blog said.

Among the giant collection of digital artifacts collected throughout its eleven years of activity, the organization counts huge Web snapsnots from its crawlers and the “first” complete literature of a people that went on-line – the Balinese Digital Library Collection.

All the 10 Petabytes of digital data collected by the Internet Archive are freely and publicly available to everyone – be they researchers, historians or simply computer users. The most noteworthy projects of the Archive include the Wayback Machine, a “time machine” of the web hosting billions of web pages as they looked at a fixed point in time.

Source: Internet Archive Blogs

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18 Comments

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These guys are amazing. I just can't stress how much I support their efforts. It's mind boggling to think of what a tool this will be for historians 50 or 100 years down the line. And at the same time, they're backing up books and letting users contribute their own data!

I wish harddisk manufacturer create a big harddisk, with the size of 5 1/4" or DVD Rom drive. they can get more than 10 TB easily without too much work.
big data are very popular now. and it is difficult to achieve using 3 1/2" harddisk.

utomo said,
I wish harddisk manufacturer create a big harddisk, with the size of 5 1/4" or DVD Rom drive. they can get more than 10 TB easily without too much work.
big data are very popular now. and it is difficult to achieve using 3 1/2" harddisk.

ive always wondered that too, you could fit some serious amounts of data on one of those, but a couple of bigger spinning disk going as fast as they do now near each other might be a problem.

Sorry but how have they got so much data? Worldwide there are probably around 10 million max active websites. Internet archive have 10 million gigabytes of information. What are they wasting all of their data on, it doesn't even capture old websites data very well at all unless you still have all of the files in the same location on your server.

Brain food: The internet archive now requires the equivalent of ten thousand 1TB hard disks to hold all the data. When they started the project, commercial hard disks weren't even as big as 10GB.

Makes you think

It amazes me a random website i uploaded to my Freeserve webspace got achieved on there 12 years ago, looking back its pretty bad!

Edited by InsaneNutter, Nov 1 2012, 9:16pm :

cyberdrone2000 said,

Looks like they've hit over 1000x their goal.

It just boggles my mind that the combined storage space of the hard drives in my house gives me at least 10 terabytes.

Just what's hooked up to my iMac accounts to 8.5TB.

GS:mac

Glassed Silver said,

Just what's hooked up to my iMac accounts to 8.5TB.

GS:mac

*boasts about e-penis and having >34TB between main desktop and two servers*

cyberdrone2000 said,

It just boggles my mind that the combined storage space of the hard drives in my house gives me at least 10 terabytes.

hehe... the combined storage in my file server alone is 16TB =)