15,000 Raspberry Pi PCs go to UK students, courtesy of Google

The Raspberry Pi Foundation recently announced that it has now sold around one million of its $35 "Model B" Linux-powered PCs. Today, the company can add 15,000 more units to its total, but these PCs will be sent out to school children in the UK for free.

In a post on the foundation's blog, it announced that it has received a grant from Google Giving, the charity arm of Google. The foundation said:

We’re going to be working with Google and six UK educational partners to find the kids who we think will benefit from having their very own Raspberry Pi. CoderDojo, Code Club, Computing at Schools, Generating Genius, Teach First and OCR will each be helping us identify those kids, and will also be helping us work with them.

The grant will also help to pay for 15,000 teaching and learning packs to go along with the Raspberry Pi PCs. The foundation celebrated the Google donation in a school in Cambridge today which Google's executive chairman Eric Schmidt attended.

The Raspberry Pi Foundation launched the $35 Model B PC as an educational tool first and foremost, and the group believes that Google's new grant will help generate more interest in computer science in UK schools.

Source: Raspberry Pi blog | Image via Raspberry Pi

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15 Comments

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One thing I never liked about the Pi was the spider leg arrangement of connectors. It makes for mounting a mess. I wish they connectors were on one side

Good news. Get computing back into schools. ICT might as well be renamed Business Information Technology with its heavy focus towards business oriented tasks. I would have discovered programming & Linux of a much earlier age than what I did if I had these in school.

Exactly. All I was taught in ICT was how to use Microsoft Office.
I only got into programming because I decided to give it a try in my own time at home.

ShMaunder said,
Good news. Get computing back into schools. ICT might as well be renamed Business Information Technology with its heavy focus towards business oriented tasks. I would have discovered programming & Linux of a much earlier age than what I did if I had these in school.

True that. My "Computing" courses prior to university were all MS Office and business oriented. Fortunately for me my teacher for most of those courses was big on programming and picked all the optional programming modules where he could. So we actually got to do some basic VB stuff, which was cool. Even then though, we're talking REALLY basic, closer to writing Macros than actual programming.

Getting the hardware/programming back into computing courses is a must as far as I'm concerned. Basic knowledge of how a computer works is just as important in this day and age as the basic knowledge of car maintenance that's required to get your driving licence in my opinion.

Hahaha, impatient are we? I must say that fibre connections would be fantastic but I highly doubt we will get it anytime soon, we've only just got 4G!

This is a great move on Google's part though, I feel that proper IT education is lacking, and needs to expand into computing much more (Like Basic C+) in schools.

Chasethebase said,
Hahaha, impatient are we? I must say that fibre connections would be fantastic but I highly doubt we will get it anytime soon, we've only just got 4G!

This is a great move on Google's part though, I feel that proper IT education is lacking, and needs to expand into computing much more (Like Basic C+) in schools.

Agreed. We had three computer courses when I was in high school - software, IT and ICT (minor differences between the latter two). From what I understand now nearly 10 years later, theres only one coverall class that is still using VB6.0 for the little software teaching they do.