20% Polled at NYU Say They Would Trade Vote for Ipod Touch

Two-thirds say they'll do it for a year's tuition. And for a few, even an iPod touch will do. That's what NYU students said they'd take in exchange for their right to vote in the next presidential election, a recent survey by an NYU journalism class found. Only 20 percent said they'd exchange their vote for an iPod touch. But 66 percent said they'd forfeit their vote for a free ride to NYU. And half said they'd give up the right to vote forever for $1 million. But they also overwhelmingly lauded the importance of voting. Ninety percent of the students who said they'd give up their vote for the money also said they consider voting "very important" or "somewhat important"; only 10 percent said it was "not important." Also, 70.5 percent said they believe that one vote can make a difference — including 70 percent of the students who said they'd give up their vote for free tuition.

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The $1 Million to never vote again is a little crazy, but in most states/districts the elections aren't close enough to warrent much value to a single vote.

In the Presidental Race, NY is almost definatly going to go Democrat. Not a big deal, our democracy almost always elects the most popular candidate. But trading for an iPod Touch isn't immoral or sick or fascist or whatever, its just a realistic perspective on election machinary in the US.

It would be a slightly different story in Florida or Ohio, though.

JrDZ13 said,
The $1 Million to never vote again is a little crazy, but in most states/districts the elections aren't close enough to warrent much value to a single vote.

In the Presidental Race, NY is almost definatly going to go Democrat. Not a big deal, our democracy almost always elects the most popular candidate. But trading for an iPod Touch isn't immoral or sick or fascist or whatever, its just a realistic perspective on election machinary in the US.

It would be a slightly different story in Florida or Ohio, though.

To further the points brought: in the UK, there is wide consensus on which political party given districts are going to vote. That is why national election results are known beforehand. The shoe-ins (like Tony Blair when he was first elected PM) are assigned to party-line districts which political parties know they will win support no matter what.

I care a lot about politics, in fact I've volunteered in campaigns before. But I wouldn't vote in most races because I don't feel the outcome matters in most races. (And no, write-ins are not a good option, write-ins don't even count in most states).

In fact, I think its better that people don't vote where they either don't know enough about the races, or don't care enough about the races. I think one thing that corrupts politics is when people vote because they think they have to, rather than having a genuine opinion on the outcome of a race. So what happens is a lot of people vote who either don't understand the politics enough, or don't know why they're voting the way they do, and its more of a coin toss.

I think people who believe everyone should vote no matter what, don't get it.

Americans, btw, tend to show up in greater numbers when there's a race they think matters. For example in 1992 when Perot ran, turnout went up. In 2004 turnout went up because the country was polarized.

There's a difference between not voting when you feel you don't know enough about current politics to make an informed opinion, and arbitrarily waiving your right to vote in exchange for a cheap gimicky device, without taking the time to try to become informed about current issues and candidates.

Like, for instance right now. I haven't the faintest idea who all the presidential hopefuls are at the moment...I've not been keeping track, and all the current mud-slinging bores me to tears. But I wouldn't say, sure, I won't vote in this upcoming election in exchange for an ipod right now, because I don't know if I'll become polarized one way or another in the coming months.

The Christian fundamentalists, however, will be out voting in full force - resisting the urge to relinquish their god-given right to vote in return for a full set of talking nativity action figures.

Let's see I'm about to gradyate from college and I don't want an iPod.

Nope, you've got to try harder than that to take away my right to try to influence potilitical descions.

me personally i think voting in general overall dont matter "to much" since in general most politicians are semi-corrupt to begin with and never usually get anything done thats usefull to the public... so in other words when you do vote your voting for the "lesser of the two evils" lol

lets just hope once bush is gone stuff gets a "little" better ;)

although what needs to be done is a major overhaul of the government and get back to the basics of the constitution instead of making all these bs laws in the name of "terror" :(

nice quote from ben franklin ... "Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."

but what are your going to do... people will do damn near anything for money/power nowadays and it's getting out of hand in the gov

I know, I know, its absolutely awful what people will do for money. :redface:
BTW has anyone worked out how much it would cost to buy a presidential election? If your bribes were iPods how many would you need?

It's sad but not surprising to see where America's young adults priorities are.

Freedom is something we take for granted way too much in America and Canada. It's not something you get once and have forever, sometimes you have to fight to keep it or fight to get it, as many people have learned.

If you can't be bothered to vote don't bother complaining if your rights are challenged or you find yourself in an unwanted political situation.

I wish they had actually given them the iPod and had them sign a release for it, then promptly arrested them for election fraud. Morons. That's what's wrong with our government... morons.

PEOPLE, being an alum of the school, yeah, take my vote and pay for my ride cuz that was stupid expensive. Almost $44,000-48,000 per year (tuition, room/board, academic costs of books, etc)... yeah, I agree with the student body.

Is too expensive?. With this money you can start your own business, then failed and start over a new business and still keep some money in your pocket.

Anyways latest elections was decided by a stupid machine that failed in pro of Bush Jr.


Magallanes said,
Is too expensive?. With this money you can start your own business, then failed and start over a new business and still keep some money in your pocket.

You're absolutely correct. Literacy rates are wayyy overrated. Plus, who needs people to understand thick legal texts like tax laws... certainly not the literate population.

I never said it was too expensive; I simply said that it was stupid/mad/highly expensive. Why face the psychological realities of failure when you can simply get a cozy job as a result of demonstrating your ability to read and write!? I vote for sacrificing my vote and obtaining a free ride to a top-tier university.

Just shows how badly High Schools and Colleges are at educating the masses about Voting. If people understood better the consequences of voting AND not voting, you'd see an increase of people voting. Considering who controls education in this country it's not too surprising that they want the populace ignorant as possible.

Who controls it? If you say anything besides ultra, leftist Libs you are wrong...but its so obvious a blind man could see it ...we are so friggin doomed. YEEEEEEHAWWW!

But 66 percent said they'd forfeit their vote for a free ride to NYU.

Well.. NYU is pretty expensive.. :P

If we weren't still using the archaic electoral college system and actually had a democracy I would say my vote matters. As it is now, I'd trade my right to vote in the next election for an iPod touch in a heart beat.

So you think the whole middle of the country should have no say on who becomes president? You think only California and New York should decide who is elected? The electoral college is genius and its the best system at the moment.

Oh and we aren't a democracy:
The United States is, indeed, a republic, not a democracy. Accurately defined, a democracy is a form of government in which the people decide policy matters directly--through town hall meetings or by voting on ballot initiatives and referendums. A republic, on the other hand, is a system in which the people choose representatives who, in turn, make policy decisions on their behalf. The Framers of the Constitution were altogether fearful of pure democracy. Everything they read and studied taught them that pure democracies "have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property; and have in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths" (Federalist No. 10).

That last part sound familiar? Our reps haven't been hearing us lately and its pretty damn obvious we've gone off the track.

Read it, learn it, live it...we've forgotten already.

One more thing, you call the system archaic. Well, considering USA is one of the youngest countries on the planet I'd say its the most non-archaic system there is.

solardog said,
So you think the whole middle of the country should have no say on who becomes president? You think only California and New York should decide who is elected? The electoral college is genius and its the best system at the moment.

Sorry but the electoral college doesn't work, it gives individuals too much power and skews the results while making a mockery of the voting system for the people.

So what if a few states have the majority vote, they have the largest populations afterall and the overall consensus of the Country's citizens is what should matter.

seeing how our votes dont matter, and they can pick the winner based on the electoral college and not what the real masses want, id take one of those as well.

id take an ipod over my right to vote anytime
its totally useless to me

id never support any kind of government in any way

Oh, but by not voting, you definitely ARE supporting someone. You are just not interested enough to learn about who you want to support to actually do it. To pretend that by not voting, you are somehow not subject to government and it's rules and it has nothing to do with you is simply burying your head in the sand.

BigBoy said,
Oh, but by not voting, you definitely ARE supporting someone. You are just not interested enough to learn about who you want to support to actually do it. To pretend that by not voting, you are somehow not subject to government and it's rules and it has nothing to do with you is simply burying your head in the sand.

actually, i have researched, and i i pay alot of attention to politics
not one is worth the time it would take to vote for them

X'tyfe said,
id take an ipod over my right to vote anytime
its totally useless to me

id never support any kind of government in any way


Yeah, that's normal.

Good luck to you when a political party introduces a new law or similar that you vehemently loathe, yet you were too lazy to use your vote to potentially avert said problem.

Samboini said,
Good luck to you when a political party introduces a new law or similar that you vehemently loathe, yet you were too lazy to use your vote to potentially avert said problem.

im only one man, so theres no point
any goverment does as it pleases regardless, the US government is the best example

X'tyfe said,
id take an ipod over my right to vote anytime
its totally useless to me

id never support any kind of government in any way


i'll take that as an "i don't care whether I live in a state which's gov is fully of nazis or not!"?

Glassed Silver:mbl

It is truly disgusting that students are not taking voting seriously. They say it is important, and that one vote can make a difference, yet they would be willing forgo participating in our country's future for a now-fashionable iPod touch (that will be obsolete in a year or less), free tuition, or $1 million dollars. If they truly thought voting was important, they wouldn't exchange the privilege to vote for anything in the world. I sure wouldn't!

Wrong. America is the land of the free. We do not need to vote if we feel like it. Voting is just another optional privilege of being free.

htwho said,
Wrong. America is the land of the free. We do not need to vote if we feel like it. Voting is just another optional privilege of being free.

Doesn't one have to vote for the right person to actually maintain the freedom though?

Well, I vote every year but most Americans seem to like the status quo until the administration does something quite stupid and horrific then people will use their votes to kick the administration out. Hopefully, that will happen this election.

htwho said,
Wrong. America is the land of the free. We do not need to vote if we feel like it. Voting is just another optional privilege of being free.

So what? Australia is a land of freedom as well, but we all have to vote. Making everyone vote gives you an accurate representation of what the majority of the population want. It doesn't make sense to hold an election to decide a leader of your group, when not everyone in the group has to vote.

osirisX said,

So what? Australia is a land of freedom as well, but we all have to vote. Making everyone vote gives you an accurate representation of what the majority of the population want. It doesn't make sense to hold an election to decide a leader of your group, when not everyone in the group has to vote.

Is there a "no vote" option on the ballot?

osirisX said,

So what? Australia is a land of freedom as well, but we all have to vote. Making everyone vote gives you an accurate representation of what the majority of the population want. It doesn't make sense to hold an election to decide a leader of your group, when not everyone in the group has to vote.

How are you made to vote? Are you fined? And what if you don't agree with any candidate or law thats being voted on? Theres lots of times an issue/law will be voted on where I don't like either choice, I cant imagine having to vote on something like that? Just curious, how does that work?

EchoNoise said,

Thats called a donkey vote :P

Haha so true. But no, there isn't that option.

This is a testament to the America of today... and sadly it's beginning to rub off on other countries

How are you made to vote? Everyone registers on the electoral roll. If you don't register you are fined. Everyone then has to vote at all elections. If you don't put in a vote you are fined.

What if you don't agree with any candidate and/or either option? To bad I guess. But how can be both for and against an issue?

Is there a "no vote" option? No.

Forcing everyone to vote is a VERY bad idea. Those who are well informed will vote wisely for qualified candidates. Others who are not informed will randomly vote or vote for candidates who spend the most on advertising, taking power away from those well informed voters. This is how bad politicians are elected and wars are started.

It would be great if voting devices could filter well informed votes from the others.

linuxamp said,
Forcing everyone to vote is a VERY bad idea. Those who are well informed will vote wisely for qualified candidates. Others who are not informed will randomly vote or vote for candidates who spend the most on advertising, taking power away from those well informed voters. This is how bad politicians are elected and wars are started.

It would be great if voting devices could filter well informed votes from the others.

Yes. That's why America, a country that does not enforce voting ended up with Bush who went to war with Iraq. Those informed voters chose wisely.