4G signal could hit digital television signal in the UK

Everything Everywhere, except on your television.

While it isn't exactly widespread yet, there is a 4G-LTE rollout happening in the United Kingdom. Granted, prices are extortionately high at the moment, but it might be possible to understand why. Rolling 4G out took time but the costs might not yet be over; another £180m bite out of the government's pocket might be just around the corner.

4G-LTE in the UK operates on the 1800MHz band, but the government is also auctioning the right to use the 800MHz spectrum for LTE. More than two million televisions could see the ramifications of this being sold, for the two frequencies are dangerously close. The result could be distorted video, and even some complete blackouts. Reconnecting the televisions could somehow take up to £10,000 per case.

Should there be issues with digital television and the 4G-LTE rollout on the 800MHz band over the next year, the impact for Freeview users could completely ruin their viewing experience. Somehow, that'll also cost the government the guts of £200 million to put right.

Source: Independent

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To be more accurate, the spectrum being auctioned is close to the UHF channels (basically anything over UHF channel 60, which is around 780-790MHz) that in SOME places of the UK carry muxes for digital terrestrial television channels (e,g, in London/South East - Crystal Palace transmitter in other words - no muxes operate anywhere near UHF channel 60+, however in North Wales, some muxes do transmit on and near UHF channel 60).

What may happen is that the authorities in charge of DTT spectrum may just change the UHF channels that the muxes broadcast on in the areas likely to be affected, to mitigate the theoretical problem (and in fact, they ARE already doing this, in North Wales - http://www.ukfree.tv/fullstory.php?storyid=1107052043).

So basically the government are auctioning the spectrum including the guard band? The guard band is the required buffer between channels to prevent chnallels from bleeding. One would think that they would simply revise the auction not to include it or they will make it a condition of the spectrum not to use it in areas where there is an adjacent channel.

What is really annoying is that spectrum so disjointed across the world. Governments raise billions in auctions so it makes it hard to fiddle with it once its sold so they dont have to pay back if spectrum is devalued and costs in changing.

Really we need to get together to standardise frequencies worldwide, so that on a certain date well into the future (when these expensive leases would have expired by then and new leases to expire before this date), everything will be switched onto it, and all devices by then would be designed to be compatible with this changeover (in a world where everything is controlled in software that is a firmware update away and radios support multiple frequencies and bands this is technically possible).
1 TV standard. 1 Mobile phone standard.

Hopefully by then we will just have software radios and antennas, and then the ability to support 3G, 4G and bluetooth will be rolled into a single piece of hardware. Where simple software updates can add support for new standards

Simon- said,
So basically the government are auctioning the spectrum including the guard band? The guard band is the required buffer between channels to prevent chnallels from bleeding. One would think that they would simply revise the auction not to include it or they will make it a condition of the spectrum not to use it in areas where there is an adjacent channel.

What is really annoying is that spectrum so disjointed across the world. Governments raise billions in auctions so it makes it hard to fiddle with it once its sold so they dont have to pay back if spectrum is devalued and costs in changing.

Really we need to get together to standardise frequencies worldwide, so that on a certain date well into the future (when these expensive leases would have expired by then and new leases to expire before this date), everything will be switched onto it, and all devices by then would be designed to be compatible with this changeover (in a world where everything is controlled in software that is a firmware update away and radios support multiple frequencies and bands this is technically possible).
1 TV standard. 1 Mobile phone standard.

A nice ideological idea but will never will happen, because every region or country has their own requirements for frequencies e.g. one country will need a ton of frequencies for certain uses (especially considering the size of that country and the technological uses for it) while another doesn't. Standardisation across the entire world won't let them allocate frequencies freely as required by the laws of that country.

Time to start building those tuners to spec! If you're only supposed to be listening on xMHz, you better not be listening on x-50MHz and x+50Mhz. After that GPS issue, you'd think it'd be an apparent issue by now.