A PC per child programme kicks off in UK

In September, Prime Minister Gordon Brown announced details of a home access project allowing PC and internet access to families so that children can enhance their learning at home.

The plan will see £300 million spent on providing computers and broadband internet to families. The Home Access project will go nationwide next autumn and will ensure every 5- to 18-year-old has home access by 2011. Currently around a million children do have access to broadband at home.

Schools Minister Jim Knight detailed the steps which includes a year-long pilot scheme in Oldham and Suffolk. It will specifically target families that have home broadband access but do not use the technology for their children's benefit; can afford access but do not think technology has educational value; cannot afford home access or need support in obtaining it.

Stephen Crowne, Chief Executive of Becta said "There's no question that technology plays an increasing part of our everyday life at home and school. What we need to ensure is that every learner has an equal chance to tap into the benefits of the internet to enhance their learning – and the Home Access programme seeks to do just that, by offering this opportunity to all learners."

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why waste all that money,

the goverment could set up a charaty that would donate refurbished computers to familys that need them.
much like a charaty in cheltemham called ITSchools Africa who ship out computers that have been donated to them buy any one who wants to get rid of ther old computer or large orginisations such as local colleges etc...

wouldent that be a better use of the tax payers money insted????

Pointless. British youngsters are neither starved of or hungry for knowledge. England is quickly descending into a service and information economy, while other countries are pumping out scientists and engineers.

I hope these PCs are of great help to all those wonderful 'Media Studies' majors out there.

It will specifically target families that have home broadband access but do not use the technology for their children’s benefit; can afford access but do not think technology has educational value; cannot afford home access or need support in obtaining it.

Only the last group should be targeted IMO as they are the ones who don't have anything. Why should a household that has broadband get additional help just because they aren't "behaving" according to the rules? More nannying from the state: get broadband and a PC for your children or you're stunting their educational growth.

It's a great idea, but will the computers they provide be any good, will there be only one kind or model of computer given away or would it be given like vouchers where you go to a store that sells PC's and choose one to the amount given in vouchers?

Awesomeness said,
It's a great idea, but will the computers they provide be any good, will there be only one kind or model of computer given away or would it be given like vouchers where you go to a store that sells PC's and choose one to the amount given in vouchers?

I don't think the computers need to be brilliant. Just usable. Just think about it, £300 million divided by one million families is £300 per family. You're not going to get a brilliant PC and internet connection for that sort of money, wholesale or not, but you can get something usable at least.

Why would the government give £300 million to the BT group? They're already rolling in cash. This programme is just a token gesture. How many school children are without access to computers in the UK these days?

Either the local authorities will swallow up most of the cash or the government will never need to spend it.

This is yet another idea stolen from the tories.

We all know what will happen.

1)It will take too long to start the ball rolling.
2)People will sell the pc's on eBay.
3)A cog will stop because suddenly they would rather have a sponsor
rather than pay directly for them.
4)It will only be rolled out to low-income families only.
5)They will ship a heap of junk that will collapse after a few boots.

Why should I work to pay taxes so that lazy unemployed families can get free computers.

I already pay for their drugs, beer, clothes, council tax, rent and cigarettes.

It's a stupid idea.

Every library has computers you can use, some you can walk in and use them and others need a booking.


MightyJordan said,
Not a bad idea, but could they please spend that much money into improving the UK's broadband as well?

There are already plans to spend several £billion on rolling out fibre optic across the country. £300 million to provide everyone with decent internet access is a brilliant idea. Internet access is almost a necessity in this day and age.