A simple way to avoid being the next Star Wars Kid

Fifteen years ago, the world wide web was the playground of boffins. Its design reflected the open ethos of those users: it had no central managers, no main menu and no investment in content – indeed, no business plan whatsoever.

Instead, its framers assumed that people would put their own material online, and users would then surf from one site to another, following links on the pages.

Then the first search engines sprang up, which sent digital robots crawling from one link to the next, copying everything they found. The idea was to index the entire web in one place by obsessively following every path from several starting points.

Soon you could search the web by entering a search term and finding all the pages that contained it. This shortcut rankled with some webmasters. Even though they'd chosen to put their data on the web for all to see, they felt far more exposed once any words they used within their pages could turn up as search results.

View: Full Article @ Times Online

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(Cy Bones said @ #1.2)
Agreed, the full article starts with:


and then goes on to discuss privacy and an interesting proposal to use tags to mark online data (photos, videos etc) as private.

Worth a read...

Sounds nice in theory, but you don't need a certain percentage of "non-forwarders" to be private. You need to eliminate the "forwarders". From the article:
Take the Star Wars Kid test yourself: imagine someone has forwarded you a link to the video and you think it’s funny. You’re about to share it with friends. But then you see that it’s been marked by the kid himself as private, with a desperate plea not to fan the flames along with an explanation of what happened to get it online in the first place. Would you forward the link?

If enough people – not everyone, of course, just enough – decided to respect the person’s wishes, the video might never reach the critical mass needed to take it viral. We know, of course, that there are bad apples online. There are people who won’t respect reasonable requests, made nicely. But it’s the rest of us who transform run-of-the-mill privacy violations online into the truly awful phenomena that they can become.

What's not needed are privacy tags, but a change in human behavior. And, quite frankly, that's not going to happen.

I'll just make a web crawling robot that searches for everything that has a "privacy" tag on it. Then my search engine will have all the juicy links :P.

A "private" tag is pointless IMHO. If you want something online to be private, it needs to be behind a password where the people who have the password are trusted to keep things private. Otherwise, there is no privacy online and you are kidding yourself if you think otherwise.

(Mango said @ #1.1)
My theory is that half the internet is porn, and the other half is star wars.

So, where is it star wars pron version?

the simplest way to avoid being the next star wars kid:

DONT RECORD YOUR SELF DOING RETARTED THINGS AND THEN POST THEM ON YOUTUBE.

no sympathy...

^ This Guy understands the internet ^

I agree, if you've got

(a) dignity
(b) a video recorder, and
© a habit of doing retarded things

don't do © in front of (b) and lose any remaining (a). The internet is not a hard game, yet some people still manage to lose.

(seamer said @ #2.2)
Considering the Star Wars kid didn't actually post the footage online himself...

and here lies the problem... dont record anything you dont want someone possibly finding and releaseing... same goes for all these sex tapes out there... you know if you never recorded it, then it would never be out there to be stolen and released!

(-Dave- said @ #2)
the simplest way to avoid being the next star wars kid:

DONT RECORD YOUR SELF DOING RETARTED THINGS AND THEN POST THEM ON YOUTUBE.

no sympathy...

He didnt. Some douche-bag punks at his school found the footage and posted it.
No sympathy for you for not knowing the background before posting.

(grid001 said @ #2.4)

He didnt. Some douche-bag punks at his school found the footage and posted it.
No sympathy for you for not knowing the background before posting.

*throws a wobbly* why even record a damn movie unless you were intending to show others; that is the whole purpose of a movie; to record a moment to show others. The fact that it was posted and makes him look like an idiot - I have no sympathy.

I have a youtube account and make my own videos; but I make videos solely to be distributed. I certainly don't make videos for solely my private enjoyment.

(grid001 said @ #2.4)
He didnt. Some douche-bag punks at his school found the footage and posted it.
No sympathy for you for not knowing the background before posting.

Let me guess, you'll also side with those celebrities who create a sex video, upload it to the internet, then go, "onoez! I didn'ts want that to happen! Now every1 will talk about me!!@"

(-Dave- said @ #2)
DONT RECORD YOUR SELF DOING RETARTED THINGS AND THEN POST THEM ON YOUTUBE.

What, like spelling retarded "RETARTED"?

I could easily see turning this into an incessant use of Blackmail. With all the cell phone cameras and video recorders and small digital cameras, we've made it far too easy to take "embarrassing" pictures of others. Worse, once its indexed on the Net its virtually impossible to remove.

Take a picture of me, I'll take one of you equally embarrassing or worse. This could escalate from there to violence or having to bribe the person for a lot of money. It can ruin peoples jobs or cause embarrassment in the community, etc.

I'm not in favor of internet police, but we should do something about pictures and video being released on the internet. I know I posted about the Lightning bolt people below ... but that's just too funny.

True.

But think how you could play it to your advantage.

I mean in the way of the starwars kid, to play it to his advantage do a star wars kid performance in high school on stage for laughs. Because after all he is the original.

(warwagon said @ #6.2)
True.

But think how you could play it to your advantage.

I mean in the way of the starwars kid, to play it to his advantage do a star wars kid performance in high school on stage for laughs. Because after all he is the original.

For fifteen minutes, you're The Star Wars Kid. For the rest of your life, you're the little fat boy that danced around like a loser and was dumb enough to videotape his infantile fantasy. That won't earn you any points or launch you into stardom unless you have some other talent aside from looking like a fool.

Fifteen years ago, the world wide web was the playground of boffins. Its design reflected the open ethos of those users: it had no central managers, no main menu and no investment in content – indeed, no business plan whatsoever.

Way to start from a flawed premise. This implies that the WWW was basically a waste of R&D funding (and by implication a waste of taxpayer money due to the funding being mainly government grants) until the great saviours of corporate interest came along with their lock-ins, PR mechanisms and pay-through-the-nose "content".

This completely ignores the fact that WWW was primarily a research resource which contained technical articles, papers, the odd RFC, etc.; a resource for the scientific community, to which access (and ability to publish to) was graciously granted to all and sundry. It was at this point that people thought "I'll put up a web page about my cat". How many of those users had a business plan?

If anything, the web owes a massive debt to the porn industry. These enterprising characters promoted all kinds of stuff, such as a greater support of image formats (anigifs of video clips anyone?), embedded media such as Flash and video, popup advertising, DHTML to get around the early popup blockers as well as providing effects, etc. which are still used to this day as a standard way of presenting content to the end user. It's only the recent explosion of "AJAX", which has been around for nearly a decade in one form or another, that has altered this paradigm to a more "do as much as possible on the client" style of presentation.

As the web increased in size, some form of search was not only inevitable but necessary. Not only did these help to find the technical papers the web originally contained, it also helped to attempt to categorise the "home pages" that millions of end users created. Anyone complaining about their [public] pages being found was considered an idiot at the time as well...

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