AACS Copy Protection For DVDs Defeated Again

Digital rights management has suffered another setback when Antigua-based software company SlySoft reportedly updated its AnyDVD HD software with a new AACS encryption code to enable the copying of ostensibly protected HD-DVD and Blu-Ray discs. Earlier this month, the Advanced Access Content System Licensing Administrator, the organization that oversees the licensing of HD-DVD and Blu-Ray video players, sent Digital Millennium Copyright Act takedown notices to Web sites demanding the removal of the online posts containing the compromised AACS code.

In mid-April, the AACSLA said that it had "expired" cracked AACS encryption keys, requiring consumers and manufacturers to update their video players with a new key though an online download. Discs to be reportedly released next week will be the first to blacklist compromised keys. But SlySoft appears to have a new key to the AACS digital lock. The AACSLA can also expire this key, but such a move will take weeks. In the meantime, the discs on the market will be copyable.

News source: InformationWeek

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20 Comments

Woo hoo, first post. Slysoft kicks all kinds of ace!!! Rock on James!!! Get their software and get it now, it does it right every time.

it almost seems like it's the same group doing all of this...

1. create better protection.
2. sell movies.
3. profit!
4. create something that breaks the copy protection.
5. sell that.
6. more profit!
7. repeat

It's not even about pirates, it's just about the person who has bought the DVD and wants to make a backup, of which they are legally entitled to do. May death rain down on Sony and their practices!!! Rock On! ©®

This is pointless. The MPAA already said they're OK with individuals "ripping" DVDs for personal use on portable media players and home media servers.

They did? Could I have a source for that? (Not doubting you, just wondering how I missed that one).
It does make you wonder why they bothered making and using AACS in the first place, mind... All it does really is hinder legitimate customers from doing what they want with what they've bought (or licensed, depending who you're talking to).

The previous poster, although putting it in a very "ZOMG FREE STUFFS!!1!1" kinda way, is right - if something like this is made, and there's enough of an incentive to get around it, it will be circumvented - and mostly in a fraction of the time it took to make it in the first place.

As an aside... Kudos to SlySoft for keeping this up (although after the initial crack, it probably takes all of half an hour to get a new working key now), and as always thanks to Emil for bringing us the news!

i agree with you. but the only way i see it stoping people is the casual people who dont really know much about copying copy-protected discs and it will probably stop them.

but as for anyone who knows a decent ammount about pc's etc in general it aint gonna stop them one bit.

It's like a car, locking it will deter the casual thieves, but if someone really wants to get in, they will, regardless of locks, alarms, etc.

Except its not a car, and it's not necessarily thieves.

How annoying.

SO if you have a HD-DVD player but no internet, you can't buy any new films? That's terrible! They just broke your player.

PureLegend said,
How annoying.

SO if you have a HD-DVD player but no internet, you can't buy any new films? That's terrible! They just broke your player.


All the more reason to pirate the Disks lol.

Well, so AACS is simply a busted DRM protection now. That's pretty clear. The new key is barely out the door and already found. I wonder how that will affect the Blu-ray vs HD-DVD battle.

On one hand you have those that might now put their faith in the extra protective layer with Blu-rays in BD+, but on the other hand, you have more customers lining up to purchase HD-DVD players for warezed HD-DVD discs.

you have more customers lining up to purchase HD-DVD players for warezed HD-DVD discs

That would be a good theory if HD DVD burners were commonplace, or the media was cheap. But neither is true.

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