Acer Chromebook 13 promises 13-hour battery with NVIDIA Tegra K1

Quite a few manufacturers have hopped aboard the Chromebook train, releasing numerous Chrome-powered notebooks in recent months. Acer isn't a newcomer to this space, but it will no doubt be hoping that its blend of power, size and price will hit the right notes with cash-strapped consumers. 

The Chromebook 13 is the first notebook to run on NVIDIA's new quad-core Tegra K1 processor, promising both a decent amount of power and the kind of battery life that many more expensive laptops can only dream of. 

Acer says that buyers should expect to enjoy up to 13 hours of battery life with the Chromebook 13, but as The Next Web points out, this applies only to those versions with the lower-resolution display. Chromebook 13s with Full HD displays should still expect a pretty decent 11 hours of battery life.

It may not win any design awards but at least it's not too chunky, at just 18mm-thick and weighing in at around 1.5kg. Three configurations will be widely available, catering to various needs and price points.

The cheapest comes with a 1366x768px display, 2GB RAM and a 16GB SSD for $279.99; the second bumps this up to a Full HD (1920x1080px) display; and the most expensive doubles the RAM to 4GB and increases onboard storage to 32GB.& A fourth configuration, exclusively for the education sector, features the lower-resolution display and 4GB of RAM, priced at $329.99.

All models include two USB 3.0 ports, an SD card reader, HDMI port and 802.11ac Wi-Fi, as well as a 720p webcam. 

Source: The Next Web | image via Acer

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-adrian- said,

How can a grade school profit from ChromeOS


Are you serious? A lot of the higher end schools around here are using them.. They are cheap and don't require much maintenance.. They do all their work, research, reading on them. This cuts down on paper cost as well.. ChromeOS offers a lot more than people think or realize. Do some reading up, before you go slandering a brand you never even used before.

Yes I have use Chrome OS. It's not an OS that can be use anything else but a browser. All the programs that you can use are not that good.

ACTIONpack said,
Yes I have use Chrome OS. It's not an OS that can be use anything else but a browser. All the programs that you can use are not that good.

Oh, so I cannot edit docs, pics, watch videos, email my friends, play games....

And keep in mind, you can do a heck a lot more in a browser window than you used to be able to do and is pretty much how the ChromeOS was advertised and the purpose.

ChromeOS may not be for you and that is fine as it is not for me either. But lots are finding a use for them. They wont ever overtake MS or Apple, just an alternative for those looking for one.

ACTIONpack said,
It's like comparing GIMP to Photoshop. It can do the job but not as well or as quick!

Depends on what you are doing.

fusi0n said,

Are you serious? A lot of the higher end schools around here are using them.. They are cheap and don't require much maintenance.. They do all their work, research, reading on them. This cuts down on paper cost as well.. ChromeOS offers a lot more than people think or realize. Do some reading up, before you go slandering a brand you never even used before.

So answering my question ends up telling me I am slandering? so the ChromeOS is good because they can do research and reading on them. Tell me one Screen device running a GUI operation system running a browser that would not be suitable for grade students than:O Also I cant see $300 as being "cheap"

trojan_market said,

I did, they are slow ( even the high spec one) and you can only browse the web with it nothing else.

Then you must have not used in in a while. There are lots more you can do on a Chromebook than surf the web.

No touch screen? No thanks. /s

Almost tempted to get one of these though.. been tinkering with the Intel XDK a bit recently, would be a good playground for it as a "for the hell of it" purchase.

Max Norris said,
No touch screen? No thanks. /s

Almost tempted to get one of these though.. been tinkering with the Intel XDK a bit recently, would be a good playground for it as a "for the hell of it" purchase.


It dose have touch screen

SHS said,

It dose have touch screen

My comment was a jab at Techbeck's post and wasn't meant seriously (/s), but these models do not have a touchscreen, that's on their Celeron model.

Max Norris said,

My comment was a jab at Techbeck's post and wasn't meant seriously (/s), but these models do not have a touchscreen, that's on their Celeron model.

Cant you touch any screen? :p

Max Norris said,

My comment was a jab at Techbeck's post and wasn't meant seriously (/s), but these models do not have a touchscreen, that's on their Celeron model.

If your ref to C7, C710 and latest C720 then yes your right as that was cost of the touchscreen panel being high and are Intel CPU at the time and by the time we get them they are all ready out date as they are usely are all ready 1 year old before we get them in are hands.
The only thing missing from it is a backlit keyboard

Edited by SHS, Aug 12 2014, 2:41pm :

Well the "full laptops" just get there due to the competition. For those prices you couldn't even get a netbook back in the days. At the end the customer has the advantage of the vast competition Microsoft ends up on all frontlines

Chromebooks are doing their best to impersonate the failed netbook endeavor of the past. Why would anyone buy these? The commodity PC business is littered with tons failed attempts to sell these cheap stuff. Remember when HP and Dell were thinking about retracting out of the PC business?

Of course Acer's quarter of a billion dollar net loss reiterate this same story.

I wouldn't personally want a Chromebook but I have deployed over one thousand now and for what I need them for they are pretty great. I don't need to think about them after I have rolled them out. They update themselves. I don't need to worry about crap being installed. I don't need to worry about malware or security software updates. It is a 'deploy and forget' machine and I love it for that. Anyone using it can sign in and all their favourites, etc. are pulled in. Job done.

I love my Chromebook. If it had been released before I bought my latest Windows laptop, I would've never bought it and hung on to my 6+ year old one.

I feel the same way about these as I did the iPad when it first came out. Who would want one?! But what ya know, a sheet of glass with a charge port is kinda fun after all... I definitely see the value. With 11hr battery life and super speedy power-ups and network connectivity these things are great for a portable web browser.

After reading all these commits, I had decided not to buy Chromebooks because I am a older man and have been using Windows since 1999. (Old dogs new tricks).

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