Acer reveals new version of Aspire R7 laptop/all-in one for Windows 8.1

Back in May, Acer announced the Aspire R7, a rather unique looking Windows 8 notebook that had a special hinge for its display. That hinge let the screen flip around and allowed the Aspire R7 to be used as an all-in-one PC. Today, Acer announced it will release a new version of the Aspire R7, with the version number R7-572, that will have Windows 8.1 installed out of the box and include a few new additions.

Acer says that the new version of the 15.6 inch Aspire R7 will come with a an Acer Active Pen, a stylus that the company claims can be used in combination with the touchscreen gesture controls of Windows 8.1. It adds:

With N-trig DuoSense, this active stylus uses electromagnetic induction technology and responds to varying degrees of pressure sensitivity like an actual pen, resulting in a greater range of pen strokes and more natural writing.

The Acer Aspire R7 will also come with a set of Acer Touch Tools apps that include MemoryBinder, a photo app that Acer says lets users add paint brush effects to images and lets them arrange photos so they tell a story. The Screen Grasp app can capture images so they can be personalized and then sent out to a user's various social networks. The AccuFinger app is supposed to help people interact with smaller items on a touchscreen than they normally would with their fingers. Finally, the OneNote-like Scrapboard app is supposed to help collect texts and images from the Internet to share with others.

While Acer didn't reveal the hardware specs inside the new Acer Aspire R7, it is supposed to be released in Europe, the Middle East and Africa sometime before the end of 2013, with a starting price of 999 euros. There's no word yet on when or if it will be released in the US.

Source: Acer | Image via Acer

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22 Comments

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Personally I think ALL trackpads suck. Never use them, never will. I"m a true blue mouser with the exception of the old IBM Thinkpad that had the little joy stick in the center of the keyboard. My reason to hate trackpad is that I just can't stand to figure out where the curser is when my palms accidentally hit/rub the trackpad.

I'm typing this on me MacBook Air where I have the trackpad deactivated. My wife just bought the R7 Acer with Windows 8. IMHO, Windows 8 sucks. I've been through Win 95, Win 98, Vista, XP and Win7. All of these upgrades flowed from one to another. This Win8 is a horse of a different color.

I suppose after one gets through the HUGE learning curve, it will be fine. However, count me out as I went over to the DARK SIDE about 5 years ago when I bought my first MacBook.

Confession, I do use Parallels to access Win7 strictly for MS Office. Other than that, I'm on the Dark Side.

well it's design is no gimmick and best from factor I've used so far, we'll see if competition ever brings something similar.

I'd never buy an Acer product. They don't feel strong at all (I don't care whether plastic or metal) but they really do feel like they'll break. They put tons of specs in there to entice wanabee customers but it simply isn't worth the hassle. Decent when they work. Nightmare when they don't.

djpailo said,
I'd never buy an Acer product. They don't feel strong at all (I don't care whether plastic or metal) but they really do feel like they'll break. They put tons of specs in there to entice wanabee customers but it simply isn't worth the hassle. Decent when they work. Nightmare when they don't.
I agree with you for the most part. I had a chance to play with the R7 and it surprisingly felt solid.

and when was the last time you used acer product that is above average pricing point? In my eyes in last couple of years they improved quite a lot. R7 is a solid machine.

I brought an Acer Aspire 8930G Laptop or whatever the model which cost a grand. It broke pretty quick and the customer support was unwilling to really help. Luckily I had insurance. I since brought a Tablet and a Lenovo desktop PC for my brother and both products have immense build quality. I have learnt.

x.iso said,
WTF, I would like to exchange my R7 on this one. Why didn't they bring pen input in first place??
How do you like your R7? What kind of tasks do you use it for? I've played with one in the store and it was cool but not cool enough to buy one.

I use it for any task needed, be it work, gaming, creativity tools or media entertainment and in a tablet mode too. mind you, it's actually much better tablet experience than with slate form-factor, you don't have to hold the thing in hand or hands all the time, it's sitting on your laps and angle can be adjusted just right. the hinge is very sturdy.
also when at home I connect it to another multitouch monitor with usb 3.0 hub (like this: http://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/5044270/WP_001337.jpg). when just surfing the web and gaming I use only external monitor and scroll with built-in monitor as touch is still enabled on it and is projected onto second screen. so basically I'm using built-in screen as a huge trackpad. But when using content creating applications, I do enable main screen to expand work space. as you can see the keyboard is still accessible in such setup and even back-lit when it's getting dark (although on the photo it does seem to be dark, but the screen is turned right to the light source, so light sensor is disabling the back light).

I give that guy about 30 mins to an hour before his arm starts cramping up. I played with this laptop or the older model at Best Buy and it is a cool laptop. But the novelty wears off when your neck, shoulder, and arms start hurting. Before the "you must be weak" or "go to the gym" comments start rolling in, my arms are bigger than most guys legs on this website.

JHBrown said,
I give that guy about 30 mins to an hour before his arm starts cramping up. I played with this laptop or the older model at Best Buy and it is a cool laptop. But the novelty wears off when your neck, shoulder, and arms start hurting. Before the "you must be weak" or "go to the gym" comments start rolling in, my arms are bigger than most guys legs on this website.

Then you use the trackpad or a mouse if you tire this easily.

As for the stylus, I am going to assume that it is like the Surface Pro and other TabletPC type devices that allows the user to rest the hand/palm on the screen while using the Stylus. Which is one of the most 'learned' and natural input methods in 'history'.

I have been using large touch and stylus input devices for over 20 years, and find your remark lacking any credible experience. As with all input devices, the user has to adapt the location and get use to them; however, touch and stylus inputs are predominately the most natural and 'healthy' as they contribute far less to RSI than a trackpad or a mouse.

(I can remember people complaining about the first trackpads and how their fingers would cramp up and how worthless they would be for any prolonged use. Here we are 20 years later, and the same inane arguments are being made again for another input modality.)

Mobius Enigma said,

Then you use the trackpad or a mouse if you tire this easily.

As for the stylus, I am going to assume that it is like the Surface Pro and other TabletPC type devices that allows the user to rest the hand/palm on the screen while using the Stylus. Which is one of the most 'learned' and natural input methods in 'history'.

I have been using large touch and stylus input devices for over 20 years, and find your remark lacking any credible experience. As with all input devices, the user has to adapt the location and get use to them; however, touch and stylus inputs are predominately the most natural and 'healthy' as they contribute far less to RSI than a trackpad or a mouse.

(I can remember people complaining about the first trackpads and how their fingers would cramp up and how worthless they would be for any prolonged use. Here we are 20 years later, and the same inane arguments are being made again for another input modality.)

Mobious,
I did use the trackpad but it was awkward to use it in that position. I'd like to here from someone who uses this daily. This laptop caught my eye in Best Buy but I couldn't just stand there and use it for 4 hours without one of the "yellow" shirts thinking I was trying to steal it. :-)

look, it has a huge touchscreen, so you'll rarely ever need the trackpad. if it comes to using relative based input (like needed in desktop games), it's best to use mouse (and it does come included with a laptop)

With the right price it could do well because of the cool new design compared to the same old we've been getting for some time now.

It's an interesting design in that it relegates touchpad to the background and promotes touch first. A touchpad has always been an annoyance to me so I know I'd use a mouse with this unless I wanted a "touch" of greater fidelity.
This may be market they are after. It looks fairly reasonable to me as a consumer choice.

I understand your concern. However I think it's a small price to pay for it to stop getting in the way while typing. I *hated* this about my netbook.

On the other hand, since it doesn't serve the purpose of a palm rest anymore, they could've used all that empty space for something useful...

like placing a power button for instance, although I'm not exactly sure it would be much better solution, it still can lead to accident button hit while moving the tablet and grabbing it with hands. I mean, because of the way the screen can be placed you don't exactly see where are you grabbing it and sometimes you can push it in a way that you don't notice a little bump on it and in only 3 seconds laptop would annoyingly shutdown completely. happened to me few times, but still it's a waaay better design than standard laptops or convertibles. you have to try it for yourself (and not for couple of minutes) to truly understand.