Adobe Edge coming to Windows Phone

In a tweet from the Adobe Edge team, the company have now confirmed that a mobile version of the software will be available on the Windows Phone platform, as well as the iPhone. This is good news for smartphone users, who will no doubt benefit from rich content becoming available in a mobile form, and enabling developers to test their coding on the move. The exact timeline to which it will become publicly available has not been published, however many suspect it will be quite some time yet.

Adobe released a preview of Edge earlier this month, despite the fact that the software has yet to reach the normal beta phase. Adobe Edge aims to allow web designers to create websites in a more graphical environment, with a great amount of support for the HTML5 web standard. WPCentral originally reported the tweet, with hopes that it will deliver a fresh wave of content that has so far been limited with the lack of Flash support on many mobile devices.

As the internet moves forward and HTML5 becomes more common, Adobe has found that its Flash application has become less popular with developers. HTML5 inherently aims to rid webpages of third party applications, so it makes sense that Adobe attempts to keep its products relevant to programmers by supporting the new standard.

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Their choice of support for WP is understandable, because of it has unrivaled hardware acceleration support.

FMH said,
Their choice of support for WP is understandable, because of it has unrivaled hardware acceleration support.

Well didn't they also announce Flash about a year ago?

MFH said,

Well didn't they also announce Flash about a year ago?

If I understand it correctly, Microsoft didn't want Flash on their platform just as Apple didn't. Don't quote me on that.

Iian K said,

If I understand it correctly, Microsoft didn't want Flash on their platform just as Apple didn't. Don't quote me on that.
It's not offical, but I believe it to be true.
Microsoft said their would be Flash support in Mango, but they saw how HTML5 was progessing, and how iPhone users were having a good-enough experience without Flash. And they changed their stance.
Even Adobe seems ready to bury Flash with Edge.

I wish Adobe would stop saying that they use HTML5 in this. It doesn't even use <canvas>. It just uses JavaScript to animate <div>s so that they support older browsers.

It's by design. Per Adobe.. "We seriously considered Canvas, but current performance on mobile browsers (especially iOS) is very bad. We didn't want to have the first experience produce content that couldn't run acceptably. Note that this may be changing in iOS 5, so that's good." Although I agree, it should have been an option from the beginning for those that wanted it anyway.

http://forums.adobe.com/thread/884525

Meph said,
I wish Adobe would stop saying that they use HTML5 in this. It doesn't even use <canvas>. It just uses JavaScript to animate <div>s so that they support older browsers.

Canvas was always a non-standard proprietary extention created by Apple to disrupt the web.
Then they forced it to be included in HTML5 (it's easy when an Apple developer is the head of WHATWG).

"On March 14, 2007, WebKit developer Dave Hyatt forwarded an email from Apple's Senior Patent Counsel, Helene Plotka Workman[3], which stated that Apple reserved all intellectual property rights relative to WHATWG's Web Applications 1.0 Working Draft, dated March 24, 2005, Section 10.1, entitled “Graphics: The bitmap canvas” [4], but left the door open to licensing the patents should the specification be transferred to a standards body with a formal patent policy."

Meph said,
I wish Adobe would stop saying that they use HTML5 in this. It doesn't even use <canvas>. It just uses JavaScript to animate <div>s so that they support older browsers.

omg...

Do people really think HTML5 is all about the most useless concept, canvas?

Is this because Google and Apple are trying to use the canvas to 'side-step' having
acceptable performance? (i.e. Google's response to the Microsoft IE9 fish demo was them using the canvas to render OpenGL graphics, which has NOTHING to do with a browser or HTML5.)

This is the time when people need to WAKE UP, and realize that they need to demand better HTML5 performance, and this especially means graphically rich content.

If you compare the latest Chrome or Chrome build to IE9 or IE10, it is STILL running HTML5/CSS3 graphical content 10-1000 times slower. (And the 1000 is not an exaggeration.)

When IE9 can get 30fps on a freaking phone, and Chrome can't get over 5fps on a high end desktop computer running the exact same HTML5/CSS3 graphical website test, there is something wrong... And it is not the hardware or HTML5.

Using an Atom 270 based netbook, If you can get a solid 30fps in all of these tests in Chrome or Safari, you will know they have finally caught up to IE9.

http://ie.microsoft.com/testdrive/

Until then, go yell at WebKit and Google and Apple and Firefox - as the future is Microsoft's to own at this moment, with no signs of a engine revamp.

(Why is IE9 so much faster at these tests? Go check out the developer video on channel9 that talk about how IE9 is designed. Instead of treating web content like a document/page to display, it treats web content like code, and using JIT concepts on all content - not just javascript. They also using async models of threading, GPU computing, GPU rendering, etc. )


The information is out there, and there is a reason that the canvas is worthless unless you are going to run 3rd party content in the 'canvas' which is what HTML5 and CSS3 are trying to GET PEOPLE TO STOP DOING.