Adobe rolls out beta of Flash Player 10

Adobe today rolled out a beta version of its Adobe Flash Player 10 (formerly called Astro) browser plug-in, which adds features to help designers and developers create special effects and cinematic Web experiences.

The new offering adds support for custom filters and effects created using Adobe's Pixel Bender tool kit, Adobe said. The Pixel Bender technology is used in the company's After Effects CS3 tool, which creates motion graphics and visual effects for film and broadcast.

"We're doing things that really change the game of what's possible on the Internet," said Tom Barclay, senior product marketing manager of Flash Player. "The community now has the ability to upgrade the capabilities of the player and create new types of effects and cinematic experiences that are not available with any other browser plug-in."

The beta version of the player also includes native 3-D transformation and animation capabilities, an extensible rich-text layout, and graphics processing unit hardware acceleration, he added.

View: ComputerWorld

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That whole argument that users don't need a 64-bit plugin because it has no performance gains doesn't fly. It's an F U to users who actually use a computer for more than one task. How dare a user spend the money to purchase a computer with 4GB of memory but also want to do simple tasks on the same machine also such as web browsing. With Microsoft breathing down Adobe's neck with a 64-bit edition of Silverlight, I can't imagine Adobe is doing it on purpose. I guess you can just chalk it up to being a conglomerate. There's a reason why Macromedia was Macromedia and not Adobe. Adobe had to buy Macromedia and get rid of its in-house application, GoLive. Macromedia was just more responsive to the needs of the web designer. When you're as big as Adobe, it's easy to for them to have "blind spots" that you can drive a bus through. But again, they're managing the equivalent of a large city. Time to incorporate ie spin-off?

I wish they'd come out with a 64-bit version for Vista. Whenever I visit myspace.com where pages have flash, my IE windows turns black or invisible. On a few occasions, it has completely crashed Internet Explorer. When it asks me to allow it to check online for a solution. It says that my Flash player is to blame and to update it. It's been updated to the latest version and it still has this problem. Maybe the WoW64 emulation doesn't work so well with Flash player. Wouldn't that be a good reason to run the plug-in in native mode? Stability so that IE doesn't crash or do weird things.

(trunksy said @ #10)
I wish they'd come out with a 64-bit version for Vista. Whenever I visit myspace.com where pages have flash, my IE windows turns black or invisible. On a few occasions, it has completely crashed Internet Explorer. When it asks me to allow it to check online for a solution. It says that my Flash player is to blame and to update it. It's been updated to the latest version and it still has this problem. Maybe the WoW64 emulation doesn't work so well with Flash player. Wouldn't that be a good reason to run the plug-in in native mode? Stability so that IE doesn't crash or do weird things.

I have the exact same issue! Using a 32-bit Flash plug-in on WoW64 emulation is buggy, at best. It sounds like from previous posts that the experience is similar to a nswrapper. Loss of the window completely even though the task is still running in the taskbar. At least it's not a complete crash, eh?

A 64-bit Linux version would be nice as well, but they haven't even ported to 64-bit for Linux on version 9 so I'm not holding my breath.

If they'd want to stick it to the penguin, I guess they wouldn't release a player for Linux at all.

I don't know why Linux has higher minimum requirements than Windows, but it seems the requirements on that page for video playback are exactly the same for Windows and Linux.
You definitely woudln't have fun with youtube on a 450MHz processor on Windows. Flash is a dog when it comes to video playback, on any platform.

I have entire facilities running 64 XP and 64 Vista and we for one are very glad to avoid all the advertisements that don't play in our 64 bit native browser. :)

If we need to see something on youtube, we run explorer 32 bit or firefox.

I hope the Open Screen project will take effect soon, I'm getting tired of being stuck on Flash 7 on the Nintendo Wii.

Where the heck is 64-bit flash... don't they realize that 64-bit is becoming more and more mainstream each year? or do they think everyone will just use 32-bit browsers in 64-bit OS's forever? With CS4 going 64-bit you'd think they'd be working on Flash in 64-bit now

Why the hell would we need 64-bit browsers, or the Flash player in 64-bit?

Do we really need more than 2GB of memory for these? I don't think so.
Where is the advantage?

(dodgetigger said @ #3.1)
Why the hell would we need 64-bit browsers, or the Flash player in 64-bit?

Do we really need more than 2GB of memory for these? I don't think so.
Where is the advantage?

Yes we DO need them.

I dont think you will see too many mid-high level boxes with less then 4Gb RAM, its just so cheap why not take advantage of it. I personally use Vista x64 for professional development which the OS is happy enough to use, 8Gb would be nice in the future.

Unfortunately due to the crappy plugin providers most x64 users still use 32 bit browsers that run in Wow mode. This doesnt make any real difference to me as a user but it would be nice to use a native x64 compiled browser if I could. These future products should strive toward that.

(tntomek said @ #3.3)
Yes we DO need them.

Why? The advantages of going 64-bit basically are:
  • Ability to use more than 2GB of memory (not needed in a browser, or the Flash plugin)
  • faster for calculating stuff in 64-bit precision. (not needed in a browser, or the Flash plugin)

(tntomek said @ #3.3)
Unfortunately due to the crappy plugin providers most x64 users still use 32 bit browsers that run in Wow mode. This doesnt make any real difference to me as a user but it would be nice to use a native x64 compiled browser if I could.

That is exactly the point. "It would be nice", nothing more. There just is no benefit for the end user. I'd rather have the developers work on useful things than to make a 64 bit-version of their software, when it is just not needed.

(dodgetigger said @ #3.4)

Why? The advantages of going 64-bit basically are:
  • Ability to use more than 2GB of memory (not needed in a browser, or the Flash plugin)
  • faster for calculating stuff in 64-bit precision. (not needed in a browser, or the Flash plugin)


That is exactly the point. "It would be nice", nothing more. There just is no benefit for the end user. I'd rather have the developers work on useful things than to make a 64 bit-version of their software, when it is just not needed.

The whole point is to eventually have native 64-bit apps that run natively on 64 bit processors instead of on legacy layers in the OS. 64-bit isn't 'new'; major applications should have some strategy to develop for this platform.

(alpha_omega said @ #1)
I guess the Flash source code must be so cr*ppy that they can't compile and release it for 64bit...

Possibly because Flash player users on 64-bit platforms are a vanishingly small percentage of Flash player users.

Last time I checked, web browers were not even taking advantage of 32bit architecure. I don't see a lot of high performance 64 bit web browsers out there.

But the people likely to be writing flash apps will very possibly be 64 bit users. Small (if you can call it small) issues still gets developers ect off side and potentially see them moving to developing for other content platforms besides flash. It's hardly a good move to not support x64.

Given that we're now reaching the limits of what 32-bit systems can achieve, I'd say that the days of 32-bit computing are numbered. My next system will be 64-bit, and so will my housemate's, which will mean the end of 32-bit computing in our house completely.

Geez. That's the first thing I thought about. Not a single word about 64bits in http://labs.adobe.com/ :/
They can port Photoshop CS4 to 64bits (which is millions and millions lines of code)... they can convert Photoshop (CS5) to Cocoa on Macintosh (which is a whole new toolkit)... but no... Flash Player to be native on Windows x64? That's too hard.

It's a ~1.5MB program. I'm asking myself... How big can the source code be? :sleeping: I bet the addition of the AAC and VC-1 (or was it H.264?) messed up their 64-bits plans. I really do. They probably have to port all those x86 assembly optimized code to x64....

Btw guys... here are the release notes for the Beta... http://labs.adobe.com/technologies/flashpl...leasenotes.html

Anyway, beta period is not done yet... so I'll do some wishful thinking and hope that the final build will have a native 64bits version.