Adobe still working on Flash support for Windows 8

In November, Adobe shocked the tech world when it announced that it would no longer release future versions of its Flash Player application for Google's Android OS and for the Blackberry Playbook. The decision effectively shut down future Flash support for mobile web browsers. However, the company continues to develop Flash Player, along with Adobe AIR, for other platforms.

In a newly released roadmap for the future of Flash Player, Adobe revealed more information about the future of the application. The roadmap also addresses the issue of supporting Flash on Windows 8. Unfortunately, that support is currently up in the air at the moment. The roadmap document states:

Adobe is currently working closely with Microsoft to finalize details around supported configurations for Flash Player and Adobe AIR on Windows 8. This document will be updated once this has been finalized and release schedules are available.

For users of Linux, Adobe has decided not to support a stand alone Flash Player application after the release of Flash Player 11.2. Instead, Adobe says it is working with Google to support an API, titled "Pepper", that will allow Flash to run on Google's Chrome web browser for Linux.

Speaking of Flash Player 11.2, it is scheduled to be officially released sometime in the first quarter of 2012. It will add a number of new features including support for both middle and right mouse button clicks and more support for hardware accelerated graphics cards. Adobe also revealed three more versions of Flash in the works. The first, code named "Cyril", is due out in the second quarter of 2012 and will add keyboard input support for full screen mode, among other features.

Yet another update, code named "Dolores" is due out in the second half of 2012 and will concentrate on adding gaming features. Finally, a major overhaul of Flash Player, code named "Next", is due for release in 2013.

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33 Comments

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What is there to "support"? The desktop version works already and Metro IE or WinRT won't allow Flash in apps. Only platform left is WOA desktop.

Varemenos said,
Its 2012, put this 90s technology out of its misery will you?!

And replace it with 1980s technology?

Xilo said,
So, only two platforms will be able to use Flash decently at all?

Which is 98% of computing.. I'd say that's a pretty nice number. Compared to 40% of browsers supporting HTML5, that's pretty freakin' amazing.

What needs to be clarified is whether desktop IE in WOA will support plugins like Flash and Silverlight. Earlier builds have been demonstrated running Flash, but it wouldn't be surprising if Microsoft disallows plugins in both the Metro and desktop versions of IE for WOA.

Cuppa said,
What needs to be clarified is whether desktop IE in WOA will support plugins like Flash and Silverlight. Earlier builds have been demonstrated running Flash, but it wouldn't be surprising if Microsoft disallows plugins in both the Metro and desktop versions of IE for WOA.

They already clearly said in their massive post about WOA two weeks ago that even the desktop version of IE won't support plugins.

Sounds like the work on porting flash to WOA has been scraped, like it was for wp7 (windows ce 7 had flash player 10.2 support. If microsoft wanted it, it would have been easy to support flash on wp7 since a year ago.)

However it is better not to have flash support on WOA, because it will force developpers to build native apps, like they do on smartphone platforms.

And for those who really want flash support, I expect that x86 tablets will become pretty popular when windows 8 will be released. And they will benefit from the winRT apps created because of the lack of flash on WOA. Best of both worlds!

link8506 said,
They already clearly said in their massive post about WOA two weeks ago that even the desktop version of IE won't support plugins.

There's no mention of plugins in the WOA post* (unless I missed it - I'm glad to be corrected). The relevant post** on the IE team's blog doesn't mention anything about desktop IE in WOA, just that Metro-style IE won't support plugins.

I see no disadvantage in providing support for Flash (and Silverlight) if it's feasible and users are adequately informed about the power usage implications. There are good arguments to be made for not using Flash in new products, but there's an awful lot of existing content that will be inaccessible for a subset of Windows 8 users if there's no support.

* http://blogs.msdn.com/b/b8/arc...processor-architecture.aspx
** http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ie/arc...and-a-plug-in-free-web.aspx

lol, I don't know if any of you speaks Spanish but "Dolores" means "pains", haha. Yes, a pain in the neck this is. Flash will be like IE6... always there......

Does MS have a choice?? I don't follow lawsuits and crap too often but if MS tells adobe to get lost wont MS get sued for not allowing flash??

Crying worked for google, mozilla and opera, it should work for adobe.


Speaking of Flash Player 11.2, it is scheduled to be officially released sometime in the first quarter of 2012. It will add a number of new features including support for both middle and right mouse button clicks

I laughed.

htcz said,

I laughed.

Well if multithreading GPU video decoding and asynchronous code execution and new AS3 workers and concurrency in general with even better 3D support, plus better mouse support for true gaming experience in a browser is making you laugh, then you must be DYING laughing at HTML5 capabilities.

tanjiajun_34 said,
If adobe don't create flash player for Windows 8, I guess it just speed up the death of flash player.

Not really, Flash works with Windows 8.

tanjiajun_34 said,
If adobe don't create flash player for Windows 8, I guess it just speed up the death of flash player.

We are talking about Metro, not Windows.. Windows 8 will support flash as it has before. These talks about about Flash Player and Adobe AIR running in Metro.

Please Adbode, take it easy, we're OK with no Flash support in Windows 8.
Feel free to create attack vectors on other platforms with your nasty (just to remain polite) piece of 20th century code.

TheCyberKnight said,
Please Adbode, take it easy, we're OK with no Flash support in Windows 8.
Feel free to create attack vectors on other platforms with your nasty (just to remain polite) piece of 20th century code.

You do realise processes in Windows 8 are sandboxed, meaning it's going to be harder for a Flash-based attack to compromise the system, right?

TheCyberKnight said,
Please Adbode, take it easy, we're OK with no Flash support in Windows 8.
Feel free to create attack vectors on other platforms with your nasty (just to remain polite) piece of 20th century code.

I cannot rightly comprehend the kind of confusion of concepts in your head that would make you make such an absurd statement.

cralias said,

I cannot rightly comprehend the kind of confusion of concepts in your head that would make you make such an absurd statement.

I probably understand the Flash issue more than you do then. Sorry.

The Teej said,

You do realise processes in Windows 8 are sandboxed, meaning it's going to be harder for a Flash-based attack to compromise the system, right?

This is only true for WinRT processes. Normal "desktop" mode applications do not have this protection. Therefore, the desktop IE is as vulnerable as it is under Windows 7. Flash will remain a possible malware input vector with a bad historical record and should be superseeded by HTML5 content.

TheCyberKnight said,

I probably understand the Flash issue more than you do then. Sorry.

Unless you can name a ready replacement technology that is, security aside, as full-featured, possible to supplement with readily available 3rd-party components and supported across offline and online systems, platforms and devices, no, understand it you do not. Sorry, hrmph.

Protip: HTML5 doesn't qualify

TheCyberKnight said,

This is only true for WinRT processes. Normal "desktop" mode applications do not have this protection. Therefore, the desktop IE is as vulnerable as it is under Windows 7. Flash will remain a possible malware input vector with a bad historical record and should be superseeded by HTML5 content.

Hum hum...
Flash player IS Sandboxed since IE7/vista (2006) and since chrome 11 (2011) in a "no write rights" sandbox.

It is not yet sandboxed on firefox yet, but will be in a few months. However, firefox it self won't be sandboxed, still making it more insecure than flash, ironically...

And for your information, flash is not superseded by html5 but by apps (on mobile for a few years, and soon on desktop too thanks to the app stores and sandbox on win8/osx which will make app installation from unknown sources more acceptable)

Html5 itself is too unreliable (implementation is still very buggy and different from one browser to another, and the lack of mpeg4 support on chrome/firefox makes it useless for video streaming) and too limited compared to winrt/xaml or flash.

cralias said,

Unless you can name a ready replacement technology that is, security aside, as full-featured, possible to supplement with readily available 3rd-party components and supported across offline and online systems, platforms and devices, no, understand it you do not. Sorry, hrmph.

Protip: HTML5 doesn't qualify

You just hit the point. There is none for now.
The time has come to shut the door on these badly coded malware vectors that managed to get installed on 98% of the desktop computers. Flash is one of them and the sooner it is gone, the better for the ecosystem.
Apple understood this fact before everyone else and also understood Adobe's lack of discipline. Adobe is the primary culprit of this situation.
Is HTML5 ready for prime time? Probably not. Will it ever match was possible with Flash? Possibly not (and thank God at some level). Now, it is not because it was available before that is was good. There was a time where antiviruses did not exist.

Side note: There is another Adobe piece of junk that has the same negative impact on security - the Acrobat reader.

TheCyberKnight said,

You just hit the point. There is none for now.
The time has come to shut the door on these badly coded malware vectors that managed to get installed on 98% of the desktop computers. Flash is one of them and the sooner it is gone, the better for the ecosystem.
Apple understood this fact before everyone else and also understood Adobe's lack of discipline. Adobe is the primary culprit of this situation.
Is HTML5 ready for prime time? Probably not. Will it ever match was possible with Flash? Possibly not (and thank God at some level). Now, it is not because it was available before that is was good. There was a time where antiviruses did not exist.

Side note: There is another Adobe piece of junk that has the same negative impact on security - the Acrobat reader.


flash player is now sandboxed on both IE and chrome on vista/7, and soon on firefox. Security is no longer a problem with flash.

And adobe reader is sandboxed since adobe reader X. Not a single working exploit has been found in the wild since a year ago when this version was released.

If you post comments on neowin, at least keep your informed. We're no longer in 2005! (flash is sandboxed since vista/ie7/2006)

TheCyberKnight said,

This is only true for WinRT processes. Normal "desktop" mode applications do not have this protection. Therefore, the desktop IE is as vulnerable as it is under Windows 7. Flash will remain a possible malware input vector with a bad historical record and should be superseeded by HTML5 content.

Which means Flash 12 is still available for Win 8 regardless of whether Adobe releases a new version or not, making your point moot.

The Teej said,

Which means Flash 12 is still available for Win 8 regardless of whether Adobe releases a new version or not, making your point moot.

True. Unfortunately yes, it is available.
Fortunately, you can avoid installing it.

TheCyberKnight said,

You just hit the point. There is none for now.

Wa-wa-wa-wa-wait a minute. One simply must present an alternative! Not everyone can pull St. Jobs and reduce functionality while keeping market share and profits going.
People will blame Windows for not supporting Flash content, not Adobe for not securing it properly. And half-rightly so, because Windows fails to present a secure interoperability with 3rd party tools, likely making Flash only one of a great many scapegoats.
Any such functionality cut will be a turn-off for someone. Make too many cuts and it will only turn off a lot of people no matter how good is the rest.

link8506 said,

flash player is now sandboxed on both IE and chrome on vista/7, and soon on firefox. Security is no longer a problem with flash.

And adobe reader is sandboxed since adobe reader X. Not a single working exploit has been found in the wild since a year ago when this version was released.

If you post comments on neowin, at least keep your informed. We're no longer in 2005! (flash is sandboxed since vista/ie7/2006)

The sandbox is the one created by Adobe. I think it says enough.
For "Reader", although the comment above applies, it is true no exploit was found. Kudos to Adobe for this even though I stopped using "Reader" several years ago.

Unfortunately, it does not seem Flash did benefit the same way of this protection. At least not yet. And in the end, it also doesn't chnage the fact that Adobe was lazy for all these years and continued to feed its monster.

Oh. I almost forgot. I think I can post here with confidence.

Adobe shocked the tech world when it announced that it would no longer release future versions of its Flash Player application for Google's Android OS

Pretty much saw it coming...