Adobe: Windows 8 "will support Flash just fine"

Earlier this week, Microsoft announced that the Metro version of Internet Explorer 10 for the upcoming Windows 8 operating system would not support plug-in programs. That caused many in the industry to speculate that web sites that were made to be run on Adobe's popular Flash tools might soon be a thing of the past, to be replaced by sites that use HTML5. Now Adobe has issued its own statement about Windows 8 and its support of Flash in a post on its official blog.

Adobe states, "We expect Windows desktop to be extremely popular for years to come (including Windows 8 desktop) and that it will support Flash just fine, including rich web based games and premium videos that require Flash." Adobe also said that it expects that Flash based programs will run on Windows 8 via its Flash AIR development tools.

Adobe added that the company is "about enabling content publishers and developers to deliver the richest experiences for their users, independent of technology, including HTML5 and Flash. We are working closely with Microsoft, Google, Apple and others in the HTML community to drive innovation in HTML5, to make it as rich as possible for delivering world-class content on the open Web and through App Stores. We are excited about the innovation and opportunities that are available to our customers and Adobe as the web and platforms evolve across devices, including Windows 8 and Metro."

Microsoft issued the first developers preview version of Windows 8, with the new Metro version of IE 10, earlier this week as part of its BUILD Conference. The public can go ahead and download the free developers preview from Microsoft's web site, but keep in mind that it lacks a number of features that will be in the final version of Windows 8.

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Instead of supporting a technology which needs to evolve, you should support an open technology such as; HTML5, it will blow flash away and the issues with it will be gone.

Hmm. Sounds like Adobe just want to reassure confused people that Windows 8 DESKTOP VERSION will run Flash in IE 10. They conveniently shortens that in many sentences to just "Windows 8", which makes the situation sound far better for Adobe than it really is. It's in reality quite bleak. Tablet users on Windows 8 will probably much prefer working in Metro, and there won't be Flash support there. Not from IE, at least.

And if Adobe think this isn't the first step Microsoft is taking to take out plugins altogether for Windows versions beyond Windows 8, Metro or not, they're probably sorely mistaken. Flash is a dying platform on Mac, Windows, and iOS now. Even Android users which has active support from Adobe aren't too happy about it, since it's slow and heavy. The times of Flash is over since there's now HTML5 and high-performing Javascript engines on the market. Which will always have an easier time giving better performance, since the web browsers will be under direct control by the operating system developers.

I'm not sure what Adobe are getting at here.

Metro, powered by the Windows Runtime is far superior to their AIR platform.

By the time Windows 8 ships, there will be hundreds of thousands of Metro applications, further reducing the need to drop into classic desktop.

Adobe are scared.

And I have had exactly zero issues with Flash in IE - including Immersive IE. The issues I have had with either version of IE have nothing to do with Flash. (Developer Preview x64 bare-metal install, and a VM of each bitness - all sans Flash-related issues.) I have the current versions of Yahoo Messenger (11) and the Toolbar installed as well - they also work just fine. Browser Plus - which has specific browser-isms, will not install in any version of IE10 at this point; in short, a Yahoo issue. Neowin itself, as well as Facebook, are great sites to test for Flash support (ads on Neowin are primarily Flash-based; if Flash support is missing, the open IE session asks to install the ActiveX control for Flash). Even in Immersive, it installs, and is promptly sandboxed.

Does anyone has an idea how much Flash provides to Adobe's revenue.
They really make a big fuss about it.

Another point to note. Adobe is referring to the AIR runtime mode of app packaging. (aka the iOS workaround). That should work with metro too.

rooftopview said,
Another point to note. Adobe is referring to the AIR runtime mode of app packaging. (aka the iOS workaround). That should work with metro too.
In that case, they're talking of something entirely different than most people except from "Flash" -- a Flash on the web. Flash apps? Uh yeah, probably possible, not that I think it'll give anywhere near good performance as native Metro apps designed with Microsoft's guidelines. More like a ugly kludge to take old apps to Metro then, in my opinion. It can't be easy for Adobe to be known for ugly workarounds. I think they should kill off the Flash brand within a few years to save their reputation. The web has moved on, and it's time they do as well, and focus on new tools for the modern web.

Thank you, Captain Obvious...well, at least the Adobe guys can read - they should use that skill to learn how to code secure & fast software....

Aethec said,
Thank you, Captain Obvious...well, at least the Adobe guys can read - they should use that skill to learn how to code secure & fast software....

This sounds sarcastic, but is a real issue with regards to Flash. Adobe only acquired Flash, they did not create it, and have had one heck of a time getting it working as well as it did when they purchased it.

If anyone remembers Flash back in like 2001, it ran fine on low end computers. Yet here we are 10 years later, and it runs slower, is bigger, and far more buggy. Let alone the 'additions' made over the years have made it a security nightmare, that without IE's broker sandboxing Flash, and Microsoft alerting Adobe everytime Flash exploits were being found as they were hitting the broker in IE and failing, Flash would be even a bigger security mess.

Adobe themselves have not known for robust, fast, or secure - as they didn't move well into the online world. As much as Photoshop is a great application, it is horribly slow in comparison to other software that offer similar functionality, mainly because of Adobe holding on to legacy plug-in technologies that need a serious revamp.

Elliott said,
Yes, the old Windows desktop experience version of IE10 will support Flash. The Metro version will not.

Precisely. And as average users start seeing less and less of the classic desktop because their apps are being updated to support metro so they find fewer reasons to drop out of metro, the use of Adobe Flash will drop... hopefully.

There are also two different desktop versions of IE10 -- 32-bit and 64-bit.

Adobe still haven't released a non-beta 64-bit Flash Player.

Sadelwo said,
And no more toolbars taking up half of people's screens.

Yeah lol. Uninstalling Google Toolbar, Bing Toolbar, Yahoo Toolbar, Smileys 4 U Toolbar, etc, etc, is the first thing I do if somebody asks me to take a look at their PC lol.

Yinchie said,

Toolbars = dumb IE user errors.

I think what you meant is toolbars=dumb assses didn't uncheck the option during installation of spamware instead of keep click "next"

badsey said,
hopefully the no plugin support attatude iwll make the Metro browser 99.9% crash proof

Just like how Safari is crash proof on the iPad? Oh wait, it crashes all the time...

badsey said,
hopefully the no plugin support attatude iwll make the Metro browser 99.9% crash proof

Just like how Safari is crash proof on the iPad? Oh wait, it crashes all the time...

I don't think Adobe fully read what Microsoft said. Windows 8 comes with 2 versions of IE, one for the Legacy UI & one for the Metro UI. The Legacy UI one supports Flash but it's impossible for the Metro UI one to support Flash since it doesn't support plug-ins at all...

MASTER260 said,
I don't think Adobe fully read what Microsoft said. Windows 8 comes with 2 versions of IE, one for the Legacy UI & one for the Metro UI. The Legacy UI one supports Flash but it's impossible for the Metro UI one to support Flash since it doesn't support plug-ins at all...

That is what Adobe is reiterating here

MASTER260 said,
I don't think Adobe fully read what Microsoft said. Windows 8 comes with 2 versions of IE, one for the Legacy UI & one for the Metro UI. The Legacy UI one supports Flash but it's impossible for the Metro UI one to support Flash since it doesn't support plug-ins at all...

I think its more a matter of the public at large not reading and fully understanding what Microsoft said. Because at first, no one did; it wasn't being reported as such.

MASTER260 said,
Windows 8 comes with 2 versions of IE, one for the Legacy UI & one for the Metro UI. The Legacy UI one supports Flash but it's impossible for the Metro UI one to support Flash since it doesn't support plug-ins at all...

It's not a legacy UI, it's a desktop UI...

MASTER260 said,
I don't think Adobe fully read what Microsoft said. Windows 8 comes with 2 versions of IE, one for the Legacy UI & one for the Metro UI. The Legacy UI one supports Flash but it's impossible for the Metro UI one to support Flash since it doesn't support plug-ins at all...

Basically Microsoft is dumping the 3rd party broker features of the IE sandbox for the Metro UI.

This does NOT mean that video content that is now using Flash could not still be supported. It is something Adobe needs to work out with Microsoft, as it would not be hard to do what Microsoft is doing for iOS for Adobe Flash video content on any platform/device.

"hat caused many in the industry to speculate that web sites that were made to be run on Adobe's popular Flash tools might soon be a thing of the past, to be replaced by sites that use HTML5."
Quite frankly, if all sites that currently can deliver video trough HTML5 to iOS devices rewrote their code to deliver it this way to all devices and not just devices with Mobile Safari User Agents one wouldn't run in to a whole lot of flash.

Wonder why Adobe had to make this statement though, I thought Microsoft was pretty clear in how it was just the Metro version of IE that wouldn't have flash.

Leonick said,

Wonder why Adobe had to make this statement though, I thought Microsoft was pretty clear in how it was just the Metro version of IE that wouldn't have flash.

Microsoft were clear, but just about everyone who reported and commented on it wasn't...

Leonick said,
"hat caused many in the industry to speculate that web sites that were made to be run on Adobe's popular Flash tools might soon be a thing of the past, to be replaced by sites that use HTML5."
Quite frankly, if all sites that currently can deliver video trough HTML5 to iOS devices rewrote their code to deliver it this way to all devices and not just devices with Mobile Safari User Agents one wouldn't run in to a whole lot of flash.

Wonder why Adobe had to make this statement though, I thought Microsoft was pretty clear in how it was just the Metro version of IE that wouldn't have flash.

But see that is the trick, not everyone did... A majority of video content delivered to iOS is handled by media servers that convert the content, which means that the 'big' names in the industry have not converted to HTML5, and are waiting on Microsoft and others to finish their HTML5 client media framework.

(A lot of iOS video is converted and delivered from Microsoft media servers by most of the big names. It was easier for Apple and the content providers to pay Microsoft than to implement actual functionality into iOS or convert web content just for iOS.)

As Windows 8 pushes HTML5 more, which is it is doing rather hard, the days of video in Flash and Silverlight will be gone.

HTML5 supports but doesn't 'spell out' how to do obfuscating video sources and content protection. This is where Microsoft's IIS works well, cause it inherently provides this to even HTML5 content, just like it did Silverlight, both being codec agnostic. The Microsoft HTML5 media framework is here now, and replaces Silverlight with HTML5 clients, but has some limitations that are still being added to the HTML5 media framework.

(DRM, Copy Protection, Streaming, Smooth Streaming, Adaptive Streaming, legacy codecs are what the HTML5 client media frameworks are doing that the HTML5 video tag itself does not. -And they are necessary for virtually any copy protected content like Netflix, Hulu, etc.)