Adtron Announces 160GB SSD

If you're a mobile user, this will interest you, as long as you remember Solid State Drives are an emerging technology. Adtron is upping the ante by providing SATA and IDR versions of a 160GB SSD. "New geometries and chip densities in SLC NAND enable Adtron to significantly expand the capacities of its industry leading high performance products," said Alan Fitzgerald, CEO of Adtron. The IDE (I25FB) and SATA (A25FB) versions of Adtron's SSDs use SLC NAND flash memory and will be available in a standard 2.5" notebook form-factor. The I25B IDE SSD offers read speeds of up to 70MB/sec and write speeds of up to 60MB/sec. The A25FB is just a tad bit slower at 65MB/sec and 55MB/sec respectively.

The drives also feature the ArrayPro Performance Engine which enables the fast read/write speeds as well as Erasure Data Security which provides military-level protection. There is no word on pricing or availability for Adtron's SSDs, but they will probably cost you an arm and a leg. For reference, SanDisk's 32GB drive is pegged at around $600 while Ritek's 32GB won't be much cheaper. It is very exciting that Adtron accomplished such a feat but let's face it; I don't see people buying this drive if it's going to cost them more than two of NVIDIA's 8800s. Therefore, all we can do is wait.

News source: DailyTech

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

World's First Mainboard with Open-Source BIOS

Next Story

EMI to Apple, Microsoft: Ditching DRM is going to cost you

11 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

The I25B IDE SSD offers read speeds of up to 70MB/sec and write speeds of up to 60MB/sec. The A25FB is just a tad bit slower at 65MB/sec and 55MB/sec respectively.

Did they get this backwards, since when is IDE faster than SATA?!

M-Systems came out with a 128GB FFD (Fast Flash Disk) SATA quite awhile ago.
FFD are the forerunner of SSD which have been in use for military and aerospace, telecommunications, servers, and high availability computing systems. I'm glad to see the technology peeking out into the real world, along with increases in read/write speeds.

For those that want to know more about how this technology is used in computing systems there is some good info at the following link.
http://www.msystems.com/NR/rdonlyres/F0547...ATA_Spec_UM.pdf

anybody other than the military, government spies who buys one of these is a dope.
As with anything "bleeding edge", I wait until version 1.x

sweet. now when someone asks what the largest flash drive is I can say 160gb and see the "you're an idiot" expressions on their faces

The trouble is in 15 years NSSD will be vastly increaced with the capacity they are now it will take a mass buying spree at vastly lower capacities before the market rearlly starts to take off.