Amazon launches Kindle Cloud Reader

Amazon's success with its Kindle eReader device and its Kindle downloadable software apps for a variety of platforms have led the way in offering books for download. Now, Amazon has expanded its reach yet again with the launch today of the Kindle Cloud Reader. The new service will allow Kindle users to access Amazon's library of nearly 1 million eBooks via a web browser, using HTML5.

In a press release today, Amazon goes over some of the features of the new Kindle Cloud Feature. At the moment, it's only available for Google's Chrome and Apple's Safari web browsers. More web browsers are supposed to be supported in the coming months. In addition, iPad users can access the Kindle Cloud Reader today via its own Safari browser with a specially made touch interface. The Kindle Cloud Reader allows people to read eBooks and also download books for offline reading. Users can also customize the look of the book in the cloud reader including changing the color, text font and size and more. You can also sync up your eReader notes, bookmarks and more across the Kindle hardware device or Kindle software apps.

This is just the latest development in Amazon busy eReader business. It has been selling its Kindle devices for some time and, while the company doesn't reveal specific sales numbers, it is speculated that both the sales of Kindle readers and sales of eBooks via Amazon have been highly successful. Amazon is expected to launch a more fully featured Android based tablet device later this fall.

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Motorola willing to ship Windows Phone devices if it could get Nokia-like deal

Next Story

Steam announces beta of Steam Trading service

14 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Meph said,
Sigh. Use feature detection, not browser detection.

Just because a feature is supported does not mean that it works the exact same way. It should, but doesn't

Sraf said,

Just because a feature is supported does not mean that it works the exact same way. It should, but doesn't

Of course not. What Meph said is true though. The HTML5 way to code is with feature detection. As a content provider you need to have faith that the browser ecosystem is working really hard to ensure compliance to the specification.

If you use silly browser detection instead of feature detection, you're not future-proofing your content. All you are doing is creating more work for yourself down the road.

dotf said,

Of course not. What Meph said is true though. The HTML5 way to code is with feature detection. As a content provider you need to have faith that the browser ecosystem is working really hard to ensure compliance to the specification.

If you use silly browser detection instead of feature detection, you're not future-proofing your content. All you are doing is creating more work for yourself down the road.

You are correct, though this may still be an old way of doing things, for consistency's sake. Many companies would rather block access to content in fear of it not working correctly rather than let it be used, but with the chance that it might not work %100.

This also is in response to Apple's App Store policy -- in app subscription and the 30% BS. I hope all subscription-based services in the app store go this route and give Apple the middle finger.

I know it may be a bit of an inconvenience for some, but it is necessary in many ways.

Mainer82 said,
Firefox 6 isn't supported? I'm sure it would work fine, it seems as though they are biased towards webkit.
Firefox 5 isn't either (at least under Linux)

cybertimber2008 said,
Firefox 5 isn't either (at least under Linux)

I think that Webkit is the focus right now, and that other browsers will be supported later. The reason for this, as I take it, is because of Apple's onerous terms on monetary cuts from in-app sales on iOS. Amazon wants to bypass that by not needing a native app, and since iOS uses Webkit, is makes sense to target that specific engine first, then work out the bugs on the others

Sraf said,

I think that Webkit is the focus right now, and that other browsers will be supported later. The reason for this, as I take it, is because of Apple's onerous terms on monetary cuts from in-app sales on iOS. Amazon wants to bypass that by not needing a native app, and since iOS uses Webkit, is makes sense to target that specific engine first, then work out the bugs on the others


You're probably right, that makes more sense.

It has been selling its Kindle devices for some time and, while the company doesn't reveal specific sales numbers, it is speculated that both the sales of Kindle readers and sales of eBooks via Amazon have been highly successful.

Considering the Kindle is now Amazons biggest selling product, in the companies history - I'd say that qualifies as highly successful

That aside - good for Amazon. The trick, of course, will be letting 'typical' iOS users know that they're needs are best served via the Web App, rather than the one in the App Store.