Amazon moves your old CDs into their cloud with AutoRip

Kids, sit back and let me tell you a story about how music was in the good old days. Before iPods, Spotify, and satellite radio, we used to buy our music on thin, shiny disks called “CDs.” They could store a whole 650 megabytes of data, which was good for 60-75 minutes of music. And best of all, we didn’t have to worry about rewinding tapes or scratching records anymore! Life was good. But now all of your music is digital and you don’t have anything to hold, no liner notes to read, no artwork to enjoy.

Although the CD isn’t dead yet, it’s definitely on a downward trend as digital music continues to grow. While Amazon won’t be reversing this trend, they’ve just announced a service, called AutoRip, that may give people pause when deciding whether to purchase physical media or a lossy digital file. When you purchase a CD from Amazon, the company will also automatically put a digital copy in your music cloud. The best part is that this isn’t a “from now on” type of service: Amazon went back in time and “ripped” any CD you’ve purchased in the past too. In addition, music ripped in this way doesn’t count against your total storage allocation either.

With this move, Amazon is clearly hoping to better leverage their cloud offering and given the company’s long history and the fact that people have probably purchased dozens, if not hundreds of CDs from them over the past 10-15 years, it’s a strategy that could pay off long term. We also wonder if Amazon will soon do something similar for people who have purchased books: Could free Kindle versions be available soon? Time will tell.

Source: Amazon.com | Images via Amazon

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32 Comments

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This is very cool. It allows me to listen/download the tracks I bought with my American account from Canada.

So if you buy a CD for a friend's birthday or something (ie. you give it away), get the autoriped files in your Amazon cloud, haven't Amazon committed (or at least facilitated) piracy?

"Kids, sit back and let me tell you a story about how music was in the good old days. Before iPods, Spotify, and satellite radio, we used to buy our music on thin, shiny disks called “CDs.” "

Uhm, I still have a whole library of music (though not stored here, but in a friends' home), that is contained on.... no, not CDs, but on LDs and VINYL RECORDS! Why this wasn't mentioned? =)

Two of the eight CDs I purchased since 1998 was a gag gift for my friends baby shower. I always wanted to buy them for myself and I forgot about it until yesterday.

I'm a huge Nine Inch Nails and Beatles fan. I got my friend the Rockabye rendition of both artists. Now I have a copy.

Love the service. But I do have a question. If I buy a CD today, do I get the AutoRip version right away? Can't I just return the CD then? Or will they prorate my return?

I don't see a point to this at all. If I have the physical copy, why in the world do I need it stored in the cloud? I'm not so stupid I can't make another copy of it in just about any format I desire.

Can't even remember when I bought the last cd anyway! This cloud crap is just way over blown!

Not everyone can, also this means a copy is available to you at all times if you have a compatible device and data connection. Like if you go on holiday and forget your mp3 player with all your music on. No probs if you have a smart phone
You have to give Amazon kudos for this one...

Not completely free.
It's free if you buy the CD's from Amazon, but if you wish to upload existing CD's purchased elsewhere then the is a limit of 250 songs, if you want more it's £21.99 a year for 250,000 songs.
It's basically a way of tying you in more firmly to Amazon's eco-system, which is fine if they sell the CD's at the same price as the competition.
As they say you never really get anything for free.

AutoRip is not the same as importing your own music to their service. mp3s you buy on Amazon dont count towards your storagequota and im guessing AutoRip mp3s will be the same.

Why stop at CDs and potentially books? I don't want to have to buy a digital edition when I've actually got the physical media. So considering I hold a license to use 'media' conferred to me when I purchased the physical, surely this license should allow me to use the artefact in any format. This would also significantly cut down on piracy... many of my digital downloads are actually ripped items for which I hold the physical media, I just can't be bothered to rip them myself.

Now, it would be fine if Amazon does the same with books... all old bought and new to buy (paper) books automatically ripped to the kindle format ...

I'd love to see that happen but I suspect the publishers won't allow it. I've bought a ton of books from Amazon over the years before switching to ebooks 2 years ago.

Ok, nice, but the world does realize that Xbox Music on Windows 8 does this automatically, right?

All your MP3/WMA collection is available from any Windows 8 PC/Phone or the Xbox, just put your music in the Music Library. Done.

I think you've missed the point of this article and what Amazon are doing. Read it again.
They're automatically ripping the tracks to their servers for you when you purchase a CD and doing the same for a large chunk of purchases you've made in the past.

So in all my years, I guess I've never bought a CD from Amazon that now has AutoRip enabled... nothings in my list "purchased". Oh well.

It may just take time; I saw a notice that they are backlogged yesterday.

What I did is go back through my orders and see how many CDs I had purchased from them; apparently I've only bought 2 CDs since 2005 and they were a gift for my wife! Oh well, it is a nice gesture by Amazon.

I might actually start buying CDs again. I miss looking at album art and reading linear notes. It's a different feeling when you have the actual product in your hand.

Pluto is a Planet said,

Lol this got really off-topic, so let's keep it going. Ty for the time parameter you put into the URL! Btw you know you can do t=02m26s instead? It's very useful for not having to calculate things

I didn't calculate anything I right clicked, did copy video URL at current time. hehe

sagum said,

I didn't calculate anything I right clicked, did copy video URL at current time. hehe

I didn't know you could do that I knew there were a bunch of things from right clicking but... Now I know!

I like that anyone that purchased music after 1998 is included, that is dedication! Unfortunately it's not all music but it's a darn good start.

n_K said,
I like that anyone that purchased music after 1998 is included, that is dedication! Unfortunately it's not all music but it's a darn good start.

I had to check this out. It's actually working mighty fine. I had almost 200 tracks when I activated this feature. I wonder if they will support CD's bought from .co.uk (etc.) anytime soon too.