Amazon reveals new Kindle Fire HDX tablets and $139 Kindle Fire HD

While there have been many rumors posted about the next versions of Amazon's Kindle Fire tablets this past summer, the company finally revealed the first official details about their third generation Android-based tablets this morning. They include new 7- and 8.9-inch Kindle Fire HDX models along with a new, and very cheap, 7-inch Kindle Fire HD tablet.

All three tablets come with the next version of Amazon's Android-based user interface, Fire OS 3.0, which has the code name “Mojito.” One of the new features in Fire OS 3.0 is called Mayday, which allows users to connect to a live Amazon tech support employee who will be available at any time to remotely guide the owner through features in the tablets.

Here are some of the specs for the Kindle Fire HDX tablets:

  • Processor: Qualcomm quad-core Snapdragon 800 processor running at 2.2GHz
  • Memory: 2GB of RAM
  • Display Resolution: 1920x1200 for 7-inch; 2560x1600 for 8.9-inch
  • Camera: Front facing for both; eight megapixel rear camera for 8.9 inch
  • Battery Life: 11 hours for mixed use; 17 hours for reading
  • Prices: Start at $229 for 7-inch; $379 for 8.9-inch

Both models are currently on sale at Amazon's web site, with the 7-inch Kindle Fire HDX shipping on Oct. 18, while the 8.9-inch model shipping a few weeks later on Nov. 7. There's also an option to add 4G LTE support for either tablet. For the first time, users can choose from either AT&T or Verizon Wireless for their 4G needs.

There's also the new version of the Kindle Fire HD that might be to your liking at a cheaper price point. The 7-inch tablet has the same body as the Kindle Fire HDX, but inside there's a dual-core 1.5GHz processor and a resolution of 1280x800. It also has the new Fire OS 3.0 but lacks the Mayday feature. You can buy it now with a starting price of just $139. It will start shipping on Oct. 2.

Source: Amazon | Image via Amazon

Previous Story
Samsung joins Apple in announcing gold colored Galaxy S4
Next Story
Chrome to start blocking plug-ins using Netscape's API in 2014