Amazon's Kindle app approved for the iPad

One of the features that has had people talking about the iPad is its iBook Store, and how it will compete with Amazon's Kindle device, amongst others. Another talking point has been whether or not Apple would allow Amazon to offer its books directly on the iPad, where the two platforms would be competing. Apple has been known for rejecting applications due to "duplicating functionality" in the past, which raised the question of whether or not they'd do it again. Today, however, the question has been answered: the Kindle app for the iPad is now on the App Store, ready for anyone to download.

The Kindle app works very much as you'd expect (similarly to the iPhone version), where you browse the collection of books, download the one you want and read it at your pleasure. Interestingly, a lot of people believe that it looks much better than the version on Amazon's dedicated Kindle device, noting that they would prefer to read it on the iPad; regardless of which is the preferred device to read Kindle books on, Amazon will come off the victor.

Macworld editor Jason Snell posted a picture of the app earlier (as he has early access to an iPad), showing that it looks very similar to Apple's iBooks, complete with page turning animation and all. If you wish to try the Kindle app on the iPad when it is released in a matter of hours, head to the iTunes Store to download it. Keep in mind that it runs as a universal application, so you'll know you've got the right one if it has the + icon with it.

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26 Comments

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If I just spent that much money for a large format iPod I'd tell myself I preferred reading on it too, hehe. I suppose it comes down to accessibility and limiting the crap we carry around with us, but it really is harder on the eyes staring at an LCD (most of this do this too much as it is) and the kindle (and nook) does in reality look much more like printed text. Are they allowing B&N to sell an app as well, do they even have one for the iPad (like the iPod)?

dancedar said,
Who's going to read for more than an hour or so on a screen. Talk about killing your eyes.

You need a better screen then. It shouldn't be hurting... (seriously)

dancedar said,
Who's going to read for more than an hour or so on a screen. Talk about killing your eyes.

It's not like the ipad has a CRT screen at running at 50hz or anything. An hour shouldn't be so bad...

Edited by sask, Apr 3 2010, 4:31pm :

dancedar said,
Who's going to read for more than an hour or so on a screen. Talk about killing your eyes.

I read for long periods on my computer screen, so I don't see how the iPad would be THAT much different. At the same time I agree that e-ink would be a lot easier on the eyes than this. Maybe the next version would have both. Honestly, if this version had e-ink and full color led screen, i'd probably buy the low-end one. I tried reading a book using the Kindle app on my iPhone and didn't really like it.

Edited by Shadrack, Apr 3 2010, 5:29pm :

The Jambo said,
You need a better screen then. It shouldn't be hurting... (seriously)

The difference between a screen and a book is the following :
Screen : The light is emitted from the screen, directly to your eyes.
Book : The ambient light in the room reflects on a page and then goes in the eye.

Obviously, the eyes get tired more easily when they read something on a screen rather than a book. It doesn’t *hurt* the eyes, it *tires* them.

Shadrack said,

I read for long periods on my computer screen, so I don't see how the iPad would be THAT much different. At the same time I agree that e-ink would be a lot easier on the eyes than this. Maybe the next version would have both. Honestly, if this version had e-ink and full color led screen, i'd probably buy the low-end one. I tried reading a book using the Kindle app on my iPhone and didn't really like it.

The difference is that on an iPad reading, you will be reading non-stop and very focussed on what you are reading. When you read from a computer screen, often times you are going to be distracted by a loading of a screen, typing, or anything that strikes your fancy.

I myself like to print out what I'm reading if possible. One to highlight etc, and two, it is actually more pleasant on the eye to read.

warwagon said,
No e-ink? ...no thank!

Amen. Not going to stare at a glowing LCD longer than I have to. Already do that at work, so when I relax I'm either going to read good old paperbacks or maybe the Kindle or another e-ink based reader.

BGM said,
will likely shift a butt load of iPads

Exactly! And that is why I don't like Apple and this Market idea. They will always only regulate apps that give the most profit to Apple. If you'd come up with some inventive new application that would work against any of Apple's programs, they would block it.

In other words, you are extremely restricted.

thealexweb said,
Still no Opera Mini, Opera submitted it a while ago now and nothing from Apple.

Why is anyone surprised? Opera Mini will not be approved.

thealexweb said,
Still no Opera Mini, Opera submitted it a while ago now and nothing from Apple.

It takes apple about a month I think, its only been a week and a half so far.
I hope it gets approved, although I doubt I'd use it since Safari is great.

Anyway back on topic!

Edited by acnpt, Apr 3 2010, 2:50pm :

acnpt said,

It takes apple about a month I think, its only been a week and a half so far.
I hope it gets approved, although I doubt I'd use it since Safari is great.

Anyway back on topic!

My last 2 apps were approved in less than a week. Apple must be trying to decide what to do with Opera.

Sartoris said,

Why is anyone surprised? Opera Mini will not be approved.

The Kindle app should pose more of a threat than an alternate browser, seeing how the former competes with Apple's new e-book store. If it really doesn't get approved, that's really bizarre.

Then again, Apple could be temporarily allowing the Kindle app to pad the iPad's numbers (pun intended) at the beginning, then suddenly turn around a year later and remove the app.

Edited by Denis W., Apr 3 2010, 8:48pm :

rm20010 said,

Then again, Apple could be temporarily allowing the Kindle app to pad the iPad's numbers (pun intended) at the beginning, then suddenly turn around a year later and remove the app.

And that is why I will never get an iPhone/iPad.