AMD unveils strategy to 'Bulldoze' the competition

Executives at AMD are pursuing a new strategy to combine CPUs and graphics processors into one unit and put them into everything from workstations to HDTVs to wireless phones. At a meeting of industry analysts and journalists Thursday at AMD's headquarters in Sunnyvale, California, AMD outlined its two-pronged approach of continuing to sell to the server and desktop computer markets while also pursuing the growing market for multifunction cell phones and consumer electronics like gaming consoles and Web-connected TV set-top boxes.

The strategy is intended to leverage AMD's 2006 acquisition of graphics processor ATI Technologies and expand beyond AMD's core server and PC market to the growing home entertainment and mobile device markets. While intended to enhance AMD's stance against chip rival Intel, one analyst said it would pit AMD against new challengers already in the mobile space. AMD calls it the "Bulldozer and Bobcat" strategy, said Phil Hester, corporate vice president and chief technology officer for AMD. The Bulldozer line represents the server, workstation, and PC market, while Bobcat, a reference to a smaller type of construction vehicle that is about the size of a fork-lift, represents smaller handheld devices and consumer electronics.

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News source: InfoWorld

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6 Comments

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ati just delayed direct x 10 cards till next years its stock is tanking = the companies going down the toilet

amd dose not have 45nm yes on its quad core chips

they have been keeping quiet about the quad cores fsb=less than intels

and intel beat them to quad core cut prices and amd still has no commercial users of amd quad and have made almost no sales

more promises and more failed promises

Just a correction, AMD does not use an FSB.

The memory controller is integrated into the CPU, they use the HyperTransport bus to communicate with other components on the motherboard.

tkyoshi said,
Just a correction, AMD does not use an FSB.

The memory controller is integrated into the CPU, they use the HyperTransport bus to communicate with other components on the motherboard.


Just because the memory controller is integrated into the CPU doesn't mean that there's no Front Side Bus speed. It just means that it applies differently than it does on a machine with an Intel CPU.

Croquant said,

Just because the memory controller is integrated into the CPU doesn't mean that there's no Front Side Bus speed. It just means that it applies differently than it does on a machine with an Intel CPU.

Well AMD uses the HyperTransport Bus. HyperTransport is used as a replacement of the Front Side Bus.

In technical terms the term "front-side-bus" is not applicable to AMD's newer processors, but yes there is a bus. The FSB interconnect from the CPU to Northbridge (Memory Controller) has been removed. Furthermore HyperTransport allows direct communication to other components on the board.

the frontside bus is the physical pathway between the CPU and the RAM controller. AMD64 (Athlon 64, Opteron, and Athlon 64-FX) processors have integrated memory controllers, meaning that there is no FSB, technically. Instead, AMD64 processors are measured by their bus speed, which is determined by the number of HyperTransport links that they employ

http://www.thejemreport.com/mambo/content/view/133/

HyperTransport
AMD Athlon64, AthlonFX, and Opteron CPU's utilize the HyperTransport Bus.

These CPU's move the memory controller into the CPU, effectively eliminating the Front Side Bus.


http://www.tech-faq.com/front-side-bus.shtml

The memory controller is no longer on the northbridge chipset. Instead, AMD has taken control of this aspect of the system and has integrated the controller onto the CPU die itself. Latency has been reduced significantly due to this, so this certainly comes as a very welcome change. Because the memory controller is located on the processor die, the memory subsystem traffic no longer has to go through the chipset for CPU-to-memory calls. Hence, the old term "front-side bus" isn't really applicable any longer. With AMD64 processors, the speed at which the CPU and memory controller interface is at full processor frequency.

http://www.hardocp.com/article.html?art=NTI0

It makes sence in certain integrated systems which is what there proposing though.

I seriously dount you going to one day buy a CPU with twin SLi graphics on-chip but then again who knows.