American Airlines replaces paper flight manuals with iPads

The Federal Aviation Administration has given approval for American Airlines to equip their pilots with Apple's iPad. Not only does the company want to be an innovator and leader within the aviation industry, the electronic devices help the airline to use less fuel. Replacing the heavy paper manuals will save the airline up to 1.2 million dollars worth of fuel a year.

The iPad weighs around 1.44 pounds (652 grams). The traditional flight bags with paper manuals and charts weigh around 35 pounds (15,8 kilograms), and are used by pilots all over the world. The airline could save on fuel costs even more, since it wants to equip flight attendants with tablets as well. American Airlines is testing how the iPad can reduce the workload of flight attendants, but for now, only its pilots will make the switch.

The airline will call the iPad kitbag the 'Electronic Flight Bag' and according to vice president Captain John Hale, the switch is an important milestone for American Airlines:

With this approval from the FAA, we will be able to use iPad to fully realize the benefits of our Electronic Flight Bag program, including improving the work environment for our pilots, reducing our dependency on paper products and increasing fuel efficiency on our planes

Back in 2011, American Airlines started a trial with the iPad as an electronic flight kit on select flights. As of this month, it will equip all Boeing 777 pilots with the Electronic Flight Bag. The company hopes all fleets will be using it before the end of the year, but it needs the FAA's approval. It would make American Airlines the first commercial airline to have all pilots use the iPad in the cockpit during all phases of flight.

Other airlines use tablets as well, such as United Continental and Alaska Airlines. If the FAA approves other tablets than the iPad, American Airlines will evaluate those as well.

Source: American Airlines via CNET | Image via American Airlines

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jasonon said,
i call bs on the saving one million dollars of fuel per year

Do you have any idea how many planes AA operate, and just how many manuals and paperwork these things replace?

If anything, I think $1million is probably a lot less to save.

TsarNikky said,
When the device crashes or the battery fails, then what? "Controlled flight into terrain?"

Do you really think not having flight manuals crashes an airplane? What the actual f***?

What is this, tin foil week on Neowin. Some people need to turn their computers off and check the world out, it's an amazing place.

Just to let you all know, the FAA and NTSB know their ****. They are very, very, very good at what the do.

The fact people are saying they won't fly AA is stupid, airlines around the world have been doing this. Just like every other bit of the aircraft, it will be redundant, so there will always ben at least 2 ipads.

And I would highly doubt a massive airline like this would allow it's pilots to do anything else on it. If they don't lock it down, they will simply tell them it's a licence breech to do anything else.

People were scared when the pilot hours became self regulated, yet pilots understand, if the company knows they overfly, they are in serious, serious trouble.

Have a little bit of faith in your pilots.

You must know Neowin better Nashy.

Those people wont fly with AA anymore because of the lack of security an electronic tablet bring.

They wont fly with AA anymore because they simply hate apple. If the tablet would be a Windows 8 tablet they would actually use AA only.

LaP said,
You must know Neowin better Nashy.

Those people wont fly with AA anymore because of the lack of security an electronic tablet bring.

They wont fly with AA anymore because they simply hate apple. If the tablet would be a Windows 8 tablet they would actually use AA only.

Yeah, fanbois make up a big part of this site, but when you've been around here this long, you kind of learn to block their comments out.

There needs to be no security for the information in a pilots manual. God forbid they get in the wrong hands and all of a sudden, everyone knows what procedure to follow when the [Random System] shows a warning light.

I think people's biggest concern is that the pilots will play on it instead of flying the plane. Most Airbus have a laptop on board for this thing now days anyway, so it's not different.

Pilots know what they are allowed to do. It is quite rare, given the number of flights around the world every day, that a pilot acts in an unprofessional way. Especially on very large, and very reputable airlines.

People don't understand how hard it is in the airline industry at the moment. It's a cut throat industry. I mean, years ago United saved a tonne of cash by restricting the amount of olives in each meal. It was a lot of money.

I guess I look at my news in Australia, and see that our national carrier QANTAS is struggling a lot. I welcome anything they do to stay in the air. They're an icon of Australia.

Imagine the fuel they would save, if they didn't have to wear ties and clips, as well as get their hair cut and stewardesses not have any pony tails.

Wt. Even after a set of pilots playing with their iPads blew an airport they were suppose to land at, AA is going to give their pilots iPads? I see an increase in crashes now. I wont be flying American Airlines.

Meph said,
You'd think they'd go for a cheaper bespoke tablet that's designed to only run one app.

Why would they, when they can recover the costs from airline passengers

I wouldn't be surprised if few particular airline fares go up by a dollar or so. That, multiplied by the number of flights on that route = profit!

javagreen said,

Why would they, when they can recover the costs from airline passengers

I wouldn't be surprised if few particular airline fares go up by a dollar or so. That, multiplied by the number of flights on that route = profit!


Lol. Very true.

Looking at that picture it appears to be a fairly modern plane, why not just build the flight manual in to another screen in the cockpit for future planes. Completely eliminating the need for a tablet and the possible dangers (dropping, power failure, spillage, etc)

How many people make up the crew in the cockpit anyway? is it 2/3?
If so if do each of them has to carry 35 pounds of books each? I could see a signifcant weight reduction to switch to tablets if thats the case

Teebor said,
Looking at that picture it appears to be a fairly modern plane, why not just build the flight manual in to another screen in the cockpit for future planes. Completely eliminating the need for a tablet and the possible dangers (dropping, power failure, spillage, etc)

How many people make up the crew in the cockpit anyway? is it 2/3?
If so if do each of them has to carry 35 pounds of books each? I could see a signifcant weight reduction to switch to tablets if thats the case

You can have a partial power failure on the plane. Where do you look to read up on fixing that mid flight after you lose access to that terminal? I think having something with a separate power system from the plane is a better solution, at least it puts my mind at ease more.

Why do I get the feeling this article is shouting "cutting corners". I thought that safety equipment like this would be custom made. Is there any chance that any of the wireless networking inside the iPad could interfere with the console if switched on? What do pilots think about this?

ShMaunder said,
Is there any chance that any of the wireless networking inside the iPad could interfere with the console if switched on?

No.

As an added bonus, this means that airlines can't restrict their use in the cabin on "interference" grounds if they can be used in the cockpit.

mrbester said,

No.

As an added bonus, this means that airlines can't restrict their use in the cabin on "interference" grounds if they can be used in the cockpit.

Or they can just keep it on airplane mode....

Well, the only con I see (and being an ipad is not a con, even tough I'm not a fan of Apple's product) is what happens if the ipad fails? Are the pilots and passengers sol? Do the have more than one ipad on board to prevent that?

sviola said,
Well, the only con I see (and being an ipad is not a con, even tough I'm not a fan of Apple's product) is what happens if the ipad fails? Are the pilots and passengers sol? Do the have more than one ipad on board to prevent that?

They'll probably have one for the pilot and one for the co-pilot. Maybe one for the stewardesses.

I somehow doubt taking out a paper book is going to save them that much on fuel... considering how much weight is on the plane to start with... and at least paper manuals you don't have to worry about it crashing or something else going wrong with an OS or just not working....

and like everyone else, how about putting the pilots on a diet first to save some money? they are always on the plane, get them to drop 30 lbs and boom.... (not saying all pilots are carrying extra weight, but the photo doesn't help the argument they aren't any)

neufuse said,
I somehow doubt taking out a paper book is going to save them that much on fuel... considering how much weight is on the plane to start with... and at least paper manuals you don't have to worry about it crashing or something else going wrong with an OS or just not working....

and like everyone else, how about putting the pilots on a diet first to save some money? they are always on the plane, get them to drop 30 lbs and boom.... (not saying all pilots are carrying extra weight, but the photo doesn't help the argument they aren't any)

That would be a form of discrimination under current laws. The American Disabilities Act strictly forbids that sort of activity.

We are talking about the weight of a single suitcase. You would be surprised at how much of a different a small amount of weight makes in comparison to the weight of a plane. Two suitcases if you replace the manuals for the flight attendants. Adding as little as 5 grams to a rc model airplane can reduce the flight time of a 20 pound by as much as 10 to 15 seconds. Scale up and the effect is even larger. Remember in the end of Pearl Harbor. They got rid of everything they could because every little bit counts when it comes down to energy consumption for such a large vehicle.

ILikeTobacco said,
That would be a form of discrimination under current laws. The American Disabilities Act strictly forbids that sort of activity.

We are talking about the weight of a single suitcase. You would be surprised at how much of a different a small amount of weight makes in comparison to the weight of a plane. Two suitcases if you replace the manuals for the flight attendants. Adding as little as 5 grams to a rc model airplane can reduce the flight time of a 20 pound by as much as 10 to 15 seconds. Scale up and the effect is even larger. Remember in the end of Pearl Harbor. They got rid of everything they could because every little bit counts when it comes down to energy consumption for such a large vehicle.

yeah, but we are talking airlines that like to cram planes full to save flights, not airlines that want to shed a few pounds... they'd save more money having a full flight as opposed to a plane with less weight and taking more then one flight to move the same number of people

neufuse said,

yeah, but we are talking airlines that like to cram planes full to save flights, not airlines that want to shed a few pounds... they'd save more money having a full flight as opposed to a plane with less weight and taking more then one flight to move the same number of people

They charge $50-$100 when you go over on your bag weight limit. I think that is a ploy designed to get people to stay under the limit. Considering the number of flights per day, even a dollar saved on a single flight after a number of weight reducing changes adds up quickly. Even if it is purely a marketing driven ploy, I think anything done that reduces the cost even the slightest is good over time.

Nice news, even though it doesn't really surprise me since many pilots already use iPads. There are many helpful iOS official apps for aviation such as charts and flight computers. I'm not exactly an Apple lover but it's nice to see aviation moving further towards mobile technology instead of these endless collections of papers/manuals/charts

ILikeTobacco said,
Since electrons don't tend to change the weight of a device.... nothing?

They do, but its very very tiny

phate said,

They do, but its very very tiny

Wasn't there something recently that said if you measured the combined weight of all the electrons that make up the internet, it's like 2 or 3 ounces...

phate said,
Good deal, kitting out their 605 planes with £270 ipads would only run them £163,000. Good saving

Considering it will save them $1.2 a year in fuel, yeah, good saving.

I don't know how I feel about the iPad replacing the paper manuals. I could see it complementing the paper manuals (after all, you can't do a CTRL+F in a paper book).

tsupersonic said,
I don't know how I feel about the iPad replacing the paper manuals. I could see it complementing the paper manuals (after all, you can't do a CTRL+F in a paper book).

You can't CTRL-F any iPad, either.

THolman said,

You can't CTRL-F any iPad, either.

I'm sure whatever app they design for it will have a search function.

iBooks has a search function anyways, so if all they wanted to do was add digital versions (PDF) of the manuals to iBooks that'd be an easy way to search within it.

THolman said,

You can't CTRL-F any iPad, either.

I'm assuming the manuals are provided through an app. which I would hope have a 'find' function. Or if it's a PDF, there has got to be a PDF viewing app that will let you find (assuming the PDF was designed correctly) something in the document.

tsupersonic said,
I don't know how I feel about the iPad replacing the paper manuals. I could see it complementing the paper manuals (after all, you can't do a CTRL+F in a paper book).

Why can't you see it replacing the manuals? The iPad's screen is great for reading while in an aircraft.

Calum said,

Why can't you see it replacing the manuals? The iPad's screen is great for reading while in an aircraft.
Actually LCD screens are really crappy for reading...

tsupersonic said,
Actually LCD screens are really crappy for reading...

I disagree. I find them fine for reading (at least, when not in sunlight, but I haven't tried reading on one when in sunlight, to test that).

Xilo said,
How would getting rid of 35lbs of manuals make any measurable difference?
"Replacing the heavy paper manuals will save the airline up to 1.2 million dollars worth of fuel a year."

Same reason they limit the weight you can have in a single suitcase. They are constantly trying to find ways to reduce overall weight. Every little bit helps.

ILikeTobacco said,
"Replacing the heavy paper manuals will save the airline up to 1.2 million dollars worth of fuel a year."

Same reason they limit the weight you can have in a single suitcase. They are constantly trying to find ways to reduce overall weight. Every little bit helps.

Let's start with the pilots

grayscale said,

Let's start with the pilots

They can't discriminate on someone based on weight unless it prevents them from doing their job. Otherwise it would be a massive lawsuit that they couldn't defend themselves from. The only time weight is a factor is if a person is to big to fit in the cockpit. The guy in the picture is overweight, but he still fits.

ILikeTobacco said,
"Replacing the heavy paper manuals will save the airline up to 1.2 million dollars worth of fuel a year."

Same reason they limit the weight you can have in a single suitcase. They are constantly trying to find ways to reduce overall weight. Every little bit helps.

Look. Someone multiplied an insanely small number by a really huge number to make a point.

This has nothing to do with actually trying to save money. It's a marketing ploy.

MrHumpty said,
Look. Someone multiplied an insanely small number by a really huge number to make a point.

This has nothing to do with actually trying to save money. It's a marketing ploy.

It has everything to do with saving money when there are 87000 flights per day....in the US alone. Wasn't there a study recently about things that rich people do that poor people don't. Saving a dollar a day is saving 365 dollars a year. People who are good with money look at long term more than they look at short term.

ILikeTobacco said,
It has everything to do with saving money when there are 87000 flights per day....in the US alone. Wasn't there a study recently about things that rich people do that poor people don't. Saving a dollar a day is saving 365 dollars a year. People who are good with money look at long term more than they look at short term.

The gross weight of a 777 is about 759,000 pounds. 35 pounds (which is 0.0044% of the total weight) is not going to save millions. That's completely marginal.

Xilo said,

The gross weight of a 777 is about 759,000 pounds. 35 pounds (which is 0.0044% of the total weight) is not going to save millions. That's completely marginal.
You are correct. How about 70 pounds for two ipads replacing the pilots hard copy and the flight attendants copy. You are thinking of it on a scale that is way to small. One small weight changing item isn't the go to fix. 100 changes to a plane that cut down on weight without compromising safety however is. It is not like this is the only change they will make. It is one of thousands over the course of the industries existence. Not making a small change because it is small adds up over time. I can save a dollar today, big deal, it's only a dollar. Do it all year and it's $365. There are around 87000(according to google) flights a day in the US alone. The airline industry has been having issues for over a decade now. Every little bit that keeps them ahead is a big deal at this point. Even if saves a company only 50k a year, that is someones job.

ILikeTobacco said,
It has everything to do with saving money when there are 87000 flights per day....in the US alone. Wasn't there a study recently about things that rich people do that poor people don't. Saving a dollar a day is saving 365 dollars a year. People who are good with money look at long term more than they look at short term.

Just so we're clear. The way to do a Cost Benefit is to compare a unit to a unit. If you think moving 30+ pounds off the plane using an iPad is the best way to save money... you're nuts. Per flight there have to be hundreds of ways to save more money. Multiple that number by your 87k flights per day and it will be huge.

It's sad what passes for reasoning today among the masses.

ILikeTobacco said,
It has everything to do with saving money when there are 87000 flights per day....in the US alone. Wasn't there a study recently about things that rich people do that poor people don't. Saving a dollar a day is saving 365 dollars a year. People who are good with money look at long term more than they look at short term.

Jesus... you're dollar a day thing is just sad. If I spend, on average, 100 dollars per day and save a dollar that's 1% reduction. If I spend 500 dollars per day that's 0.2% reduction. If I spend 10 dollars per day that's a 10% reduction. Are you seriously going to sit there and say that each task is a monumental as the other? All three scenario's end up with the same outcome. But all are incredibly different when it comes to benefit for the subject.

More importantly, if I save that dollar a day by spending 500 today, in the long term I'll win out. But what if I just choose to *not do something*. For example. If I go to Starbuck's every day and buy 2 or 3 $5 drinks should I a) buy fewer drinks or choose a cheaper brand of coffee or b) Buy my own $5000 espresso machine to make my own coffee. Surely, over time, I'll save the $5000 and turn a "profit" on my investment. But any sane person would just say a) was the better choice.

Please, god, learn.

jamieakers said,
You think they'd put the pilots on a diet before cutting out safety equipment

I don't think any safety equipment is being cut out. Where is that stated? It's most likely the iPads will provide the same information (if not more) than what the paper manuals provided.

Being an airline pilot at American Airlines, this guy obvisiously is clueless. NO safety equipment is cut out, these are electronic MANUALS so we don't have to carry 50lbs of binders...........sigh

Calum said,

I don't think any safety equipment is being cut out. Where is that stated? It's most likely the iPads will provide the same information (if not more) than what the paper manuals provided.

Calum said,

I don't think any safety equipment is being cut out. Where is that stated? It's most likely the iPads will provide the same information (if not more) than what the paper manuals provided.

Imagine the flight is crashing or due to a bump, the ipad drops, breaks the screen. Now what? flight emergency manuals are safety equipment.

BoDEAN said,
Being an airline pilot at American Airlines, this guy obvisiously is clueless. NO safety equipment is cut out, these are electronic MANUALS so we don't have to carry 50lbs of binders...........sigh

Thanks for the clarification I thought that would be the case.

WaqasTariq said,

Imagine the flight is crashing or due to a bump, the ipad drops, breaks the screen. Now what? flight emergency manuals are safety equipment.
Having a backup ipad is still less weight than a book. Also, if that is a problem, they have cases that prevent breaking in any situation that a plane would find itself in...and be able to not crash anyway.

jamieakers said,
You think they'd put the pilots on a diet before cutting out safety equipment

No kidding this guy could stand to lose the 34 pounds they saved switching to the iPad. Is it just me or are we just skidding to the reality in WALL-E faster and faster?

WaqasTariq said,

Imagine the flight is crashing or due to a bump, the ipad drops, breaks the screen. Now what? flight emergency manuals are safety equipment.

Once again, plain ignorance causes the disagreement with this action. There are no such things as "flight emergency manuals". And secondly, a pilot HAS to know ALL emergency procedures right away, so in an emergency situation, papers, manuals, checklists etc. play NO role at all.
At that moment, the pilot is allowed to do everything to save the plane. Depending on papers or iPads would be ridiculous with all these problems going on.

Cøi said,

Once again, plain ignorance causes the disagreement with this action. There are no such things as "flight emergency manuals". And secondly, a pilot HAS to know ALL emergency procedures right away, so in an emergency situation, papers, manuals, checklists etc. play NO role at all.
At that moment, the pilot is allowed to do everything to save the plane. Depending on papers or iPads would be ridiculous with all these problems going on.


Once again, please do watch some NatGeo air crash investigations, you'll know that in 'some' cases/emergencies pilots do refer to the manual, these 'some cases' make the manual a life saving item, hence making the emergency manuals are safety equipment.

WaqasTariq said,

Once again, please do watch some NatGeo air crash investigations, you'll know that in 'some' cases/emergencies pilots do refer to the manual, these 'some cases' make the manual a life saving item, hence making the emergency manuals are safety equipment.
Which means your statement changes nothing since, you know, the manuals are still there, just in a different form. Read the article and then comment next time.

WaqasTariq said,

Once again, please do watch some NatGeo air crash investigations, you'll know that in 'some' cases/emergencies pilots do refer to the manual, these 'some cases' make the manual a life saving item, hence making the emergency manuals are safety equipment.

That sounds strange, imo
I've seen about 90% of all ACI shows, I think I'm misunderstanding you a bit - at the time of a failure / emergency the pilot immediatly knows how to act, but you probably mean the pilot might be going over some checklists later which don't really relate to the emergency itself.

ILikeTobacco said,
Which means your statement changes nothing since, you know, the manuals are still there, just in a different form. Read the article and then comment next time.

Well, please ask the critical reader in you to read my above post, all I said was 'what if' the pilot drops the iPad in the emergency situation and breaks the screen? For this to happen in an emergency is quite possible. As I said keeping the ipad as an accessory to the manual it self is a good idea, replacing the ipad with it all together is not.

ILikeTobacco said,
the manuals are still there, just in a different form.

Well then they can provide them a USB with all the manuals, they can easily find someone who will gladly give the pilots there laptop in a time of emergency to read it from. By your logic the manuals will still be there, but in a different form. The point I am making is, how reliable is the ipad screen or the ipad it self in the time of emergency compared to a hard copy.

ILikeTobacco said,
Read the article and then comment next time.

I suggest next time you read all the comments made above, by the person you are replying to before making a comment.

Cøi said,

That sounds strange, imo
I've seen about 90% of all ACI shows, I think I'm misunderstanding you a bit - at the time of a failure / emergency the pilot immediatly knows how to act, but you probably mean the pilot might be going over some checklists later which don't really relate to the emergency itself.


Well, maybe you missed it? I have seen at least one where the plane crashed because they could not find relevant info quickly enough, @LaP above has seen two episodes where the pilot referred to the manual.

Again, I am not against ipads on flights, I believe they can be the first place where pilots can go look for information, but having hard manuals backup should be there.

BoDEAN said,
Being an airline pilot at American Airlines, this guy obvisiously is clueless. NO safety equipment is cut out, these are electronic MANUALS so we don't have to carry 50lbs of binders...........sigh

Yeah no EMP pulses to be found, theres some ACI about thunderclouds and bwammo, electronics fail on the airplane. meaning no iPad my dear friend mr pilot.
and good luck finding the information you need from a not working product.
You still on cargo planes or something? Why would anyone risk these critical kinda information on electronic devices only?

WaqasTariq said,

Well, please ask the critical reader in you to read my above post, all I said was 'what if' the pilot drops the iPad in the emergency situation and breaks the screen? For this to happen in an emergency is quite possible. As I said keeping the ipad as an accessory to the manual it self is a good idea, replacing the ipad with it all together is not.

Well then they can provide them a USB with all the manuals, they can easily find someone who will gladly give the pilots there laptop in a time of emergency to read it from. By your logic the manuals will still be there, but in a different form. The point I am making is, how reliable is the ipad screen or the ipad it self in the time of emergency compared to a hard copy.

I suggest next time you read all the comments made above, by the person you are replying to before making a comment.

You're right... they don't make cases to protect again dropping a few feet... how silly of me. And considering there is that one law that states they can't have a backup iPad there, clearly dropping it would be detrimental. Common sense would say that if you drop an ipad, you don't have to find again what you were looking at which is a problem a book would never have since once you find the content you are looking for, every time you pick up the book, automatically goes back to that page.

Your usb comment is just plane retarded. iPad... right there next to the pilot and would take less time to find something than a book. You realize you are on a technology site right? We actual know how specific pieces of technically work in the real world. Stop making stuff up just to suite your flawed argument.

Shadowzz said,

Yeah no EMP pulses to be found, theres some ACI about thunderclouds and bwammo, electronics fail on the airplane. meaning no iPad my dear friend mr pilot.
and good luck finding the information you need from a not working product.
You still on cargo planes or something? Why would anyone risk these critical kinda information on electronic devices only?
If the electronics on a plane fail... somehow I doubt looking through a thick manual is going to be something you are doing immediately regardless, since you know, your plane is in immediate danger.

IronChef75 said,
Guess I'll choose to fly elsewhere.

Because a company is saving fuel and using a better method of informing customers of the information? Okay. That doesn't make sense to me, but okay.

Calum said,

Because a company is saving fuel and using a better method of informing customers of the information? Okay. That doesn't make sense to me, but okay.

What is more reliable, an iPad or hard copies? What is more costly, a human life or $1.2million yearly from the entire fleet? Imagine in a flight in crises, crashing in a storm, somehow the ipad gets dropped, there goes the screen, and the instructions on the standard procedures, result can be catastrophic.

Though I live half a planet away and this does not concern me, but isn't it logical?

Electronic Flight Bags have been around for almost a decade. JetBlue started the trend by issuing its pilots with laptops in place of paper manuals. The Airbus 380 has a built-in EFB system, running on top of Windows 2000 and displaying on the cockpit sidescreens.

But that was back when Microsoft was on top.

Now, Apple is on top. And as we all know, computing did not exist before the iPad.

WaqasTariq said,

Imagine in a flight in crises, crashing in a storm, somehow the ipad gets dropped, there goes the screen, and the instructions on the standard procedures, result can be catastrophic.

Umm, really? A pilot HAS to know the emergency procedures without any manuals. It would be pretty stupid if he hadn't to. Imagine an emergency situation where the pilot is nervously searching for his papers and finding the correct lists while all these problems are going on. Heck, there would be a LOT more accidents if they had to search all their actions on paper (or in your assumption, the iPad)...

WaqasTariq said,

What is more reliable, an iPad or hard copies? What is more costly, a human life or $1.2million yearly from the entire fleet? Imagine in a flight in crises, crashing in a storm, somehow the ipad gets dropped, there goes the screen, and the instructions on the standard procedures, result can be catastrophic.

Though I live half a planet away and this does not concern me, but isn't it logical?


I'm not sure how we could measure which is more reliable. An iPad could have a technical fault (unlikely), but a hard copy could be damaged by another customer. They could have some spare iPads on board, in case one has a technical fault or in case one gets dropped, just like they may have spare hard copies on board, in the present case. Considering that, I'm really not sure whether one concept is more reliable than the other.

IronChef75 said,
Guess I'll choose to fly elsewhere.


Angry Birds might just get frightenly realistic when a 777 plows into a pig farm. At leas when the plane crashes, the pilot can Tweet it. "I crshd te plane lol!"

Cøi said,

Umm, really? A pilot HAS to know the emergency procedures without any manuals. It would be pretty stupid if he hadn't to. Imagine an emergency situation where the pilot is nervously searching for his papers and finding the correct lists while all these problems are going on. Heck, there would be a LOT more accidents if they had to search all their actions on paper (or in your assumption, the iPad)...


Well if you were an Nat Geo addict like I am, ad watched Air Crash Investigations, You'd know that in 'some' cases pilots do refer to manuals, you'd not want to be that 'some case' when the pane is about to crash and the iPad dies. I am not against keeping an iPad idea, keep it as an accessory rather than remove the manuals all together.

WaqasTariq said,

Well if you were an Nat Geo addict like I am, ad watched Air Crash Investigations, You'd know that in 'some' cases pilots do refer to manuals, you'd not want to be that 'some case' when the pane is about to crash and the iPad dies. I am not against keeping an iPad idea, keep it as an accessory rather than remove the manuals all together.

Making manuals electronic does not equal remove manuals. Please stop saying that as its confusing the people who didn't bother to read.

ILikeTobacco said,

Making manuals electronic does not equal remove manuals. Please stop saying that as its confusing the people who didn't bother to read.

I guess you didnt read the article. How are they going to save 1.2 million annually if they are keeping the manuals as paper copy too?

WaqasTariq said,

Well if you were an Nat Geo addict like I am, ad watched Air Crash Investigations, You'd know that in 'some' cases pilots do refer to manuals, you'd not want to be that 'some case' when the pane is about to crash and the iPad dies. I am not against keeping an iPad idea, keep it as an accessory rather than remove the manuals all together.

I frequently watch ACI too, but tbh I haven't ever seen an emergency situation where the pilots read their instructions off a manual

Skwerl said,


Angry Birds might just get frightenly realistic when a 777 plows into a pig farm. At leas when the plane crashes, the pilot can Tweet it. "I crshd te plane lol!"

Haha

AtriusNY said,

I guess you didnt read the article. How are they going to save 1.2 million annually if they are keeping the manuals as paper copy too?

Because the manual will be on the iPad...which will be on the plane...meaning the manual is still on the plane.. meaning it wasn't removed... it just changed forms... Seriously... how dense do you have to be to not understand that changing form isn't removing. No wonder surveys are suggesting that critical thinking skills are going down in this country...

Cøi said,

I frequently watch ACI too, but tbh I haven't ever seen an emergency situation where the pilots read their instructions off a manual

They probably have a backup iPad. Like one for the pilot and one for the co-pilot. The chance of both iPad dying and the plane crashing at the same time are close to 0.

I'm a fan of mayday too. I can recall some sodes where they refered to the manual. And i can recall 1 sode where the plane crashed cause the paper manual / paper check list was hard to navigate..

It's faster and easier to mavigate an electronic manual. It's FAR easier and faster to update it with a new version in all the planes too.

Cøi said,

I frequently watch ACI too, but tbh I haven't ever seen an emergency situation where the pilots read their instructions off a manual
f course not, the cockpit door is closed.

TomJones said,
Electronic Flight Bags have been around for almost a decade. JetBlue started the trend by issuing its pilots with laptops in place of paper manuals. The Airbus 380 has a built-in EFB system, running on top of Windows 2000 and displaying on the cockpit sidescreens.

But that was back when Microsoft was on top.

Now, Apple is on top. And as we all know, computing did not exist before the iPad.

Apple is in top of what exactly?

TomJones said,
Electronic Flight Bags have been around for almost a decade. JetBlue started the trend by issuing its pilots with laptops in place of paper manuals. The Airbus 380 has a built-in EFB system, running on top of Windows 2000 and displaying on the cockpit sidescreens.

But that was back when Microsoft was on top.

Now, Apple is on top. And as we all know, computing did not exist before the iPad.

I like how you pulled all of that, especially the last two sentences from the article.

Do you have any other fan fiction that I may read?

IronChef75 said,
Guess I'll choose to fly elsewhere.

I am in my final year of an aeronautical degree. Most aircraft are using more electronic devices, coining the phrase "fly by wire". Simply thinking that anything technical should put someone off flying, is ridiculous. Every electronic, hydraulic, pneumatic and mechanical system has redundancy built in, so IF a failure occurs, there is a back up system. For more critical components, even more back up systems exist, sometimes triple or quadruple. Some systems, such as the landing gear, don't have a back-up system as such e.g. the main landing gear strut - This will be even more rigorously tested checked then other components (which are still thoroughly tested and checked). These components are also replaced regularly, far more regularly then other components. Even the kettles on the aircraft are designed specifically to reduce weight and meet certain standards.

I can't remember the exact time frame, but aircraft components are regularly inspected for cracks in structures and their propagation. Electronic components are also checked.

Once any component has passed its life time, its sold to scrap. It cannot be recycled and re-used on any aircraft component because its fatigue cycle cannot be guaranteed.

Clearly, you can see that aircraft are an incredible engineering achievement and there is a statistic somewhere that aircraft are safer (to fly on) then driving a car on the road.

As others have mentioned, no doubt there will be several ipads, so if one breaks, another can be used. Additionally, they will have several chargers and several charger access points to the main systems. The power required to recharge the ipads will no doubt also be taken into account for the power budget, and further tweaks will be put into place in the FADEC system on the engine and ACU system.