Analysis: Vista's Ready Boost is no match for RAM

There's a new way to enhance your cache in Vista - simply plug in your Flash memory stick. But how much performance gain can you really expect? TG Daily ran an average PC through a benchmark parcours and discovered that the old rules still apply: There is no substitute for an adequate amount of system memory. Period.

Yes, the title is a bit obvious and yes, the above quote isn't exactly earth shattering either. Nonetheless, TG Daily has put together a fairly in-depth analysis of how well Vista's Ready Boost works and then some. It also includes a comparison of how Ready Boost affects Outlook 2007, iTunes 7 and Adobe Acrobat 8 startup times. Although the conclusion isn't a mind bender, the article is a very good place to start if you want to learn more about the feature in Microsoft's latest OS. Have a look.

News source: TG Daily

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Microsoft has certified Flash Drives. A certified Flash drive ran be function upto 10 years when using ReadyBoost.

Whoa, great news... This just in: The earth is not a disc! Really!!!
You must already be extremely incompetent to even remotely assume that Usb sticks could be only half-way close to Ram x)

Can ReadyBoost be used with one of those soon to be released Hybrid HDD/Flash drive, rather than an external USB pen drive?
Isn't that what ReadyBoost is meant to be used for anyway, or am I thinking of a completely different thing!?

Cheers

You wouldn't need it on a Hybrid/Solid State HDD. Readyboost simply uses a faster flash drive in front of the slower HDD. Once your HDD is faster then the pagefile on the HDD will already be faster so Readyboost would just add additional fast storage area. That'll help out Superfetch quite a bit though. The more it can load up the faster everything will be.

I can't believe that this can be a news here at Neowin.

There are enough sites where the noobs and the Mac, Linux fans can bash Vista, why can't we read some real, objective articles here, which didn't just borned from someone's *ss? :mad:

Is it all right to blame Microsoft for not adequately explaining what it's good for?

I was under the impression it was supposed to be fast swap. Billyea's post is the first time I've heard it as "store for hibernation"

It is a fast swap, faster than the hard drive at least. One of the uses is, I believe, as a store for hibernation. That's what I was told anyway, sorry if it's not true.

USB Flash Drives aren't faster than Hard Drives in terms of raw performance, but, for when accessing lots of files, the Flash Drives win because of the seek times, so this is better for when applications start up which access lots of small files.

At least they showed some benchmarks between 512 MB and 1 GB of system memory for load times There's one problem with the article... Readyboost enhances more than load times.... they should have also tested it for in app performance i.e. rendering etc.

I think there was another article previously posted indicating the performance enhancements within applications.

Indeed, I can't believe someone spent all that time to write an article based on a lack of real information of the purpose of the feature they were benchmarking.

Analysis: This article is no match for intelligence.

Vista's ReadyBoost isn't supposed to replace your RAM!!! It's supposed to replace your HARD DRIVE as a place to store session info when your computer hibernates.

exactly otherwise thryd just stick 4 internal usb connections and let ppl put usb drives inside the computer. Hah. Pretty idiotic but at least benchmarks are welcome.

billyea said,
Analysis: This article is no match for intelligence.

Vista's ReadyBoost isn't supposed to replace your RAM!!! It's supposed to replace your HARD DRIVE as a place to store session info when your computer hibernates.

... which might be a valid argument, if that was what the article was claiming.

From the article:

"The only reasonable way to expand your memory capacity for the sake of assisting SuperFetch from the outside of any PC..."

Sometimes it helps to RTFA.

Vista's ReadyBoost isn't supposed to replace your RAM!!! It's supposed to replace your HARD DRIVE as a place to store session info when your computer hibernates.

Um.. you're wrong there.

http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/...readyboost.mspx

Straight from the horses mouth as it were. Microsoft themselves say that ReadyBoost is supposed to be a cheaper or more convenient alternative to upgrading memory on your PC - obviously for systems with a memory limit or other reason why you can't just slap some more RAM in.

Been using ReadyBoost on my Vista PC at work. It seems to make a slightly noticable increase in performance - but sticking more RAM in would definately be a better alternative. I guess flash drives are real cheap though so its worth a shot before ruling it out

It is also usefull for those people who have a 1gig limit on their laptop motherboard and want to run vista. As I found out with my fathers laptop only supporting a max of 1gb in 512mb x2.

It's NOT supposed to

SWAP on a HDD is never a match for RAM either, it's supposed to be used for SWAP and I don't get why it's compared to expensive RAM. It's better for SWAP than a HDD because of seek times.

It's made for all those people who have USB memory cards they hardly ever use just to be an extension, not to replace anything. Are people so desperate to find all the dirt they can on Vista?

For the record, todays operating systems don't use memory swapping. They use paging. Anyway, I think the concept of using a USB stick for memory is a little weird, but hey, if you like it, go ahead and use it.

And yes, some people write a lot of stuff against Vista and its features. Microsoft touted all these features a lot during the Betas, so people now will of course call it over-hyped.

Basic law of physics: To every action there is always opposed an equal reaction. (in a funny way)

nw_raptor said,
For the record, todays operating systems don't use memory swapping. They use paging.

For the record, today's operating systems use swapping to transfer pages of memory to and from storage media (now plural thanks to the use of USB sticks).