Android apps now support in-app subscriptions

Google now has a new way for Android app creators to make money from their software. The company announced today that apps sold on the Google Play service can now allow their users to sign up for monthly or annual subscriptions to content and features in the apps themselves.

On the official Android developer blog, Google said:

All subscriptions are auto-renewing, for every app and game and every type of subscription product. Developers just set the price and billing interval and Google Play manages the purchase transactions for them, just as it does for other in-app products and app purchases.

In addition to offering subscriptions for apps such as magazines and journals, Android app developers can also use them to add other subscription features such as in-game currency for games. One game that will use that kind of feature is the shooter title Frontline Commando from Glu Mobile.

In the next few days, people who download that game will be able to buy subscriptions to the game's custom VIP currency packages. The subscription feature can also be used for music services, adding new game levels or any other kind of additional content. Google also announced today that 23 of the 24 top-grossing Android apps use some kind of in-app billing feature.

Source: Android Developer blog | Image via Glu Media

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8 Comments

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PsYcHoKiLLa said,
Oh great, now we get to see which app devs are greedy

This.
Hence my post above.

I pity Android users now dealing with the same as us iOS users.
Actually, I cannot stand in-App purchases at all.

I dislike subscriptions.

All this is just my opinion of course, anyone is free to think differently.

GS:mac

Glassed Silver said,

This.
Hence my post above.
I pity Android users now dealing with the same as us iOS users.
Actually, I cannot stand in-App purchases at all.
I dislike subscriptions.
All this is just my opinion of course, anyone is free to think differently.

GS:mac

The problem with apps is everyone expects them to be upgraded to version 2, 3, 4... for free. With so many apps on any of the marketplaces if you released a new version as a separate app it could just get lost in a sea of apps and your customer\user never even notices it and then moves on to another program that looks more up to date.

Developers need a way of getting their customers to pay for major upgrades without just taking a chance of releasing a completely new app and hoping they see it.

kravex said,

The problem with apps is everyone expects them to be upgraded to version 2, 3, 4... for free. With so many apps on any of the marketplaces if you released a new version as a separate app it could just get lost in a sea of apps and your customer\user never even notices it and then moves on to another program that looks more up to date.

Developers need a way of getting their customers to pay for major upgrades without just taking a chance of releasing a completely new app and hoping they see it.


If this is their solution I'm out of their business.
They could just push notify me of the new version.

So instead of paying 0.79¢ for an update to a new major version I pay a certain amount monthly/yearly that sure may be well more?
Hell no and I detest subscriptions.
I believe that push notifying to raise major update awareness would pi** off way less customers.
But they can do whatever they want, I'll take my business to the next app developer who sells his goods the way - I - want.

All this is just my opinion of course, if anyone feels they like the subscription model, all power to them.

GS:mac

This is a good thing - the freemium model has definitely ignited a new wave of super cheap games which only cost money over long periods of time - $2 here, $3 there. Yes you end up paying $40 over the course of, say, a year or two, but it's extremely sporadic payments and it all goes to the developer, meaning they can afford to make a higher quality game.