Another marketing render from the Android-based Nokia X leaked

The leaks surrounding Nokia's entry into the Android smartphone market keep coming up. Today, well know Internet gadget source "evleaks" posted up what appears to be a marketing render for the Nokia X.

The image itself looks like something that would be put on a promotional brochure or website for the phone. While the look of the phone itself has been revealed in previous posts by "evleaks", this new image does show the Nokia X logo for the first time.

While the Nokia X is supposed to run Android, rumors about the phone claim that it will have its own UI and will not connect to services such as Google Play. The device is supposed to have a four inch screen, a dual-core 1GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon processor and only 512MB of RAM, which likely means this will be a budget-priced smartphone.

Nokia is expected to officially reveal the Nokia X at a press conference during the World Mobile Congress trade show one week from today. A few days ago, Nokia's official Twitter and Facebook pages changed their colors to green, which most people believe is a rather big teaser for the announcement.

Thanks to Justin Luna via Twitter for the tip!

Source: evleaks on Twitter

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I don't know what it is but I can clearly see small freezes on Android. Even when scrolling through the home screen of a Galaxy S4.

As much of a force as HTC? I don't think Nokia would want that. Microsoft sae an opportunity to buy Nokia but Nokia was doing fine with WP. They basically owned all of WP's marketshare. Making them bigger than many OEMs who chose Android.

Maybe I've been misinformed but I was told that the Nokia X doesnt have access to the play Store. It might come with a lot of build in features but without an app store I dont consider it a smartphone. Otherwise I've been owning a smartphone for decades because I've had plenty of cellular phones with cool features. It seems to me the Nokia X is aimed at the third world market, not as a competitor to HTC's and Samsung's offerings worldwide. For that they still use WP.

Few people know this, but this happens because Linux uses a monolithic kernel with the UI in user space, while Windows uses a hybrid kernel with the UI in kernel space. This is also the reason that Linux on the desktop feels a bit laggy and annoying.

Ronnet said,
I don't know what it is but I can clearly see small freezes on Android. Even when scrolling through the home screen of a Galaxy S4.

That's probably Samsung's custom skin, or perhaps you're running lots of apps in the background? When I run pure Android 4.1+, it's smooth as butter

Ronnet said,

As much of a force as HTC? I don't think Nokia would want that.

Nokia aren't HTC. Look at how Nokia dominated the WP market starting from nothing. They had the cash, infrastructure, contacts, and production to claim a good proportion of the Android market. Instead they frittered it away chasing a 3% market share OS.

It was pride and an inflated opinion of themselves that did it. Nokia thought they had the clout and position to take an inferior 3% OS and take over the smartphone market. Well history tells us the rest. Humility can go a long way, and Nokia never showed any.

Ronnet said,

Microsoft sae an opportunity to buy Nokia but Nokia was doing fine with WP. They basically owned all of WP's marketshare. Making them bigger than many OEMs who chose Android.

Let's be honest here. Microsoft bought Nokia for fear they would release an Android device, which they were / are.

Which is better? Owning all of 3%, or 10+% of 80%? I'll give you a hint, it's not Windows Phone. Nokia was in a prime position to become the second largest Android OEM, perhaps even eclipsing Samsung, but ego got in the way. They thought they should get special treatment from Google, something even Samsung doesn't get. How wrong they were.

Even Nokia's Chairman of the board admitted recently to a finnish newspaper that the Windows Phone gamble was a disaster.

Ronnet said,

Maybe I've been misinformed but I was told that the Nokia X doesnt have access to the play Store. It might come with a lot of build in features but without an app store I dont consider it a smartphone.

Like many of AOSP devices, it'll probably come with a third party store, most likely Nokia's.

Ronnet said,

Otherwise I've been owning a smartphone for decades because I've had plenty of cellular phones with cool features. It seems to me the Nokia X is aimed at the third world market, not as a competitor to HTC's and Samsung's offerings worldwide. For that they still use WP.

The X is definitely targeting the low end, perhaps as a replacement for the Asha, or an attempt to crack China. Who knows. One thing is for sure though, it speaks volumes about Nokia faith, or lack thereof in the long term viability of Windows Phone.

a1ien said,
Few people know this, but this happens because Linux uses a monolithic kernel with the UI in user space, while Windows uses a hybrid kernel with the UI in kernel space.

I don't know of any major OS where the UI runs in kernel space. In fact, that sounds rather dangerous. Not to mention inflexible.

If you look at what modern kernels [HURD] are doing, you'll see that they're shifting more and more functionality into the userspace, by way of modular daemons / clients. The kernel itself become a server microkernel.

I couldn't comment on Windows, because we only have Microsoft's word on how it operates. But from my experience with the API, the UI appears to be separate. I'm not sure how the Windows Phone kernel works though.

a1ien said,

This is also the reason that Linux on the desktop feels a bit laggy and annoying.

It doesn't feel laggy to me. Try scrolling a lot in the Windows 7/8 explorer, that's what I call laggy, especially compared with XP, or XFCE / GNOME / KDE.

simplezz said,

That's probably Samsung's custom skin, or perhaps you're running lots of apps in the background? When I run pure Android 4.1+, it's smooth as butter

Even Nokia's Chairman of the board admitted recently to a finnish newspaper that the Windows Phone gamble was a disaster.

The X is definitely targeting the low end, perhaps as a replacement for the Asha, or an attempt to crack China. Who knows. One thing is for sure though, it speaks volumes about Nokia faith, or lack thereof in the long term viability of Windows Phone.

Wow.... I'm not going to comment on all of that since frankly I don't care enough.

But I do love my Windows Phone by Nokia so I'm going to comment on a few things.

First of all as a1ien points out it is definatly an Android thing. Maybe you dont know how smooth it can be? Ever tried a Windows Phone? After the horror of Windows Mobile I decided to leave Microsoft behind. But WP was quickly able to convince me to give them another shot, It just works.

Nokia didn't have to accept Microsoft's money. They still had the option to not renew their contract and go for Android. But they were growing and were more proftable than HTC already. I don't buy the idea that Nokia would be able to shoot to the top of the Android market.

I dont think it say anything about their faith in WP. I think it means they couldnt make a smartphone with WP requirements cheap enough to replace Asha. I wouldnt be suprised that in a few years the Nokia X2 is a WP handset. Again, if Nokia didnt have faith in WP they should be releasing an Android flagship or at the very least an mid-range device. This (almost) sub-smartphone device isnt competing with their smartphone (WP) offering.

simplezz said,

I don't know of any major OS where the UI runs in kernel space. In fact, that sounds rather dangerous. Not to mention inflexible.

You don't know what you're talking about. Take a look at where the Window Manager is found in this diagram: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...ndows_2000_architecture.svg

That's what does the trick and makes things different from Linux. The rest ~ you don't know what you're talking about

a1ien said,

You don't know what you're talking about. Take a look at where the Window Manager is found in this diagram: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...ndows_2000_architecture.svg

That's what does the trick and makes things different from Linux. The rest ~ you don't know what you're talking about

Nope, its definitely you who doesn't know what you're talking about. Just because something is in the kernel, that doesn't necessarily make it faster. It may, depending on what you need to do, how you do it and what interfaces the kernel provides.

The truth is, while that might have a small part to play, the real issue causing the slight but persistent lag in Android is the Dalvik VM that all apps have to run through. This has been around for a long time without many updates and is the single biggest cause of lag in android. They are working on a replacement called Android Runtime or ART which should do a lot to reduce the lag.

Edited by M4x1mus, Feb 18 2014, 1:49pm :

a1ien said,

You don't know what you're talking about. Take a look at where the Window Manager is found in this diagram: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...ndows_2000_architecture.svg

I guess you missed this part:

I couldn't comment on Windows, because we only have Microsoft's word on how it operates. But from my experience with the API, the UI appears to be separate. I'm not sure how the Windows Phone kernel works though.

No one knows how it operates except those who have access to the source code, and since Windows is proprietary, only those who work for Microsoft.

a1ien said,

That's what does the trick and makes things different from Linux. The rest ~ you don't know what you're talking about

The fact is, all calls to applications go through userspace [Win32] according to your diagram anyway. I really don't see how it would make a difference. The benefits of running the compositor / window manager in userspace far outweigh any negatives if there are any. On Linux I can switch out different managers at a whim, without having to recompile the kernel or reboot. I guess that's the reason why Windows has to reboot all the time after an update. Too much is located inside kernelmode. It makes sense now. Thanks for enlightening me.

simplezz said,

Except that WP hasn't run smoother than Android since 4.1 Jelly Bean's Project Butter, whereupon Google introduced a consistent UI frame rate. It actually had nothing to do with performance, only the UI frame rate, which can appear choppy if it's not consistent.

Except that WP8 does run much smoother than Android from my experience. And over the last two years I have played with a lot of Android phones and ROMS (from stock to baked beans to CM). My Lumia 928 I would take for smoothness over all of them =).

I really dont get it. This is alsmost the same specs as the 520. Why bother with developing this phone with a full stack of services ?? That's a huge effort, and i cant see the benefits.

Maybe the difference in cost for these lower specs is large? Otherwise I'm puzzled as well. Seems to me they would be smarter if they're able to produce 520's cheaper. Every 6-12 months change the look (530, 535, etc). Basically what they were doing with their cellphones but then with a low speced smartphone.

dopydope said,
I really dont get it. This is alsmost the same specs as the 520. Why bother with developing this phone with a full stack of services ?? That's a huge effort, and i cant see the benefits.

Since WP has other design requirements, its possible that using Android instead of WP means they have other areas they can cut back on. We'll have to see if its a fully fledged Android device, or if they cut it back as rumored (ie, to replace Asha, not the 520).

Also, offering a choice of well mad, entry level phones isn't bad. Especially since Android is a well accepted OS. Its a growth opportunity for them.

techbeck said,
Interesting to see if Google has a problem with the X name.
I'm guessing they'll be going after OS X next? This business of trademarking common English words and even letters is way past ridiculous now.

Yeah, yeah, I know, different market segment and all. I'm sure some or the other tech company has released a device called "something X" way before Google did and might have cause to sue them on grounds of creating confusion in the minds of customers or similar crap. My point is that these sorts of things are stupid and on the rise resulting in all sorts of needless litigation with the only ones winning being the lawyers involved on both sides.

That marketing image reminded me of Stairway to Heaven. Also the short URL's funny. Wonder how many will lust after this phone?

Each to their own I guess, I never did like those, I think my S3's too big
(N8 was the perfect phone for me, and I can use the 1520 single handedly also)

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