Apple and Nokia top wireless smartphone satisfaction survey

Apple has beaten Nokia, and various other brands, to win the J.D. Power & Associates's smartphone customer satisfaction award for the 9th consecutive time. Each brand is ranked from 0 to 1,000, with points given for performance, physical design, features, and ease of operation. Apple achieved 855 points, beating the competition in a sound fashion. Satisfaction amongst smartphone users is 796 out of 1,000, up 26 points from 2012. 

After Apple, Nokia followed with the second highest point score of 714, 141 points behind Apple. After Nokia, you have Samsung, Motorola, HTC, LG and BlackBerry in that order. LG ranked highest amongst the "traditional mobile phones" with a score of 719. BlackBerry, once the market leader, slipped lower down the table with a score of just 732. Samsung achieved a respectable 793, slightly aheads of HTC's 790. 

Apple was praised for the iPhone's "physical design and ease of operation" while also picking up a 5 (out of 5) in the Power Circle Rating metric. 

J.D. Power surveyed over 9,500 smartphone owners. 

Source: J.D. Power | Image via Jon Choo

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27 Comments

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Face the fact guys. Apple has the best hardware period. Love it or hate. I dont own an apple product because I don't like the simplicity. I am a geek. I like mysterious things that I could discover each day. But I have to admit apple is still a head and shoulder above others. In music experience, camera, number of apps. Any thing you name it

Hahaha, this is hilarious because when i ventured to the US i realized Americans are almost completely clueless as to how big Nokia is and their lowly ranking of the phone company is totally out of step with the rest of the world.

Clueless? Depends on who you ask. Nokia's lack of presence in North America for over a decade didn't exactly help matters...

Does this include Nokia's pre-windows smartphones?

Also Apple is iPhone only, which is exclusively high-end. Whereas Nokia also had mid and low-end smartphones.

I can imagine the user experience being lower on a low or mid-range device. Although Windows Phone itself remains a smooth experience even on a lw-end device like the L610. But I can't speak for Nokia's non-windows phones.

This is not to say that I find Windows Phone perfect (far from it) but I think for your average consumer the experience is easy (to understand), fast (to use) and fun (because its always in motion with your own content and interests). There is a lot of potential in it.

J.D. Powers release the survey twice a year, so it's probably pretty up to date.

Regarding the cheaper phone: People who buy a cheaper phone usually expect a lower usability rating, so will allow for that. Obviously I can't guarantee any of this (I didn't carry out the survey) but I should image it is accounted for.

Anecdotally, I know a lot of people with older iPhones (3GS, 4), which could count as low end iPhones. (They're also almost all broken, and said people are all annoyed by how slow they are)

maxslaterrobins said,
Apple did beat them by a considerable margin, however.

Of course they did. If people were to say they have problems with their iPhone, then there would be a steady stream of rabid Apple fanboys screaming that they were haters, that there is no problem with their phones, they were not doing it right and need to think different or something. It is just easier to go along with the official Apple party line than to have to fight off the fanboys.

SoylentG said,
If people were to say they have problems with their iPhone, then there would be a steady stream of rabid Apple fanboys screaming that they were haters, that there is no problem with their phones, they were not doing it right and need to think different or something. .

Are you sure you're thinking of "Apple" and not "windows 8" ?

SoylentG said,

Of course they did. If people were to say they have problems with their iPhone, then there would be a steady stream of rabid Apple fanboys screaming that they were haters, that there is no problem with their phones, they were not doing it right and need to think different or something. It is just easier to go along with the official Apple party line than to have to fight off the fanboys.

Don't understand your statement. Apple haters only exist online, in the land of the normal (and rational people), it is fine to like Apple.

CSharp. said,

Are you sure you're thinking of "Apple" and not "windows 8" ?

Why are you talking about Windows 8? I don't see it mentioned in the article.

maxslaterrobins said,

Don't understand your statement. Apple haters only exist online, in the land of the normal (and rational people), it is fine to like Apple.

Oh, yes, you are right. Sorry for questioning you, it will not happen again.

SoylentG said,
Why are you talking about Windows 8? I don't see it mentioned in the article. .

Neither do I see "rabid screaming fanboys" mentioned in the article.

maxslaterrobins said,

Again, don't understand your statement.

The statement was that people who own iPhones will not complain because if you do, then the Apple fanboys will attack them for not holding it right, for not changing their lives to conform to Apple's way of doing it, for demanding too much, and so on. So to avoid being attacked, people will just say that their iPhone, Apple and Steve Jobs/Tim Cook are pure perfection, and therefore Apple gets their great rating.

But I don't want to argue, you are right, I was wrong, I give your comments a 100% approval.

SoylentG said,

Of course they did. If people were to say they have problems with their iPhone, then there would be a steady stream of rabid Apple fanboys screaming that they were haters, that there is no problem with their phones, they were not doing it right and need to think different or something. It is just easier to go along with the official Apple party line than to have to fight off the fanboys.

No. They don't blame the phone but their self because they know they are doing it wrong.

SoylentG said,

Of course they did. If people were to say they have problems with their iPhone, then there would be a steady stream of rabid Apple fanboys screaming that they were haters, that there is no problem with their phones, they were not doing it right and need to think different or something. It is just easier to go along with the official Apple party line than to have to fight off the fanboys.


What a preposterous statement....