Apple approves BitTorrent app

Every developer knows that Apple has strict guidelines for its App store. While some applications are rejected for ridiculous reasons, one App, IS Drive made it through all of the hoops that Apple requires. The notable thing about IS Drive making it through the process is that IS Drive is a BitTorrent App. 

Apple clearly defines that BitTorrent clients are not allowed on the App Store as the client is typically "used for the purpose of infringing third party rights". So did IS Drive sneak through the process to only be pulled as soon as the news spreads or is Apple having a change of heart? The most likely answer is that it slipped though the cracks because the application is cleverly designed. 

According to Torrentfreak.com, "the application allows users of Imageshack’s torrent download service to control and add torrent downloads through a handy interface. In addition, the App shows screenshots of completed video downloads." The target of this app is for premium ImageShack Torrent Drive users but the approval raises many questions as Apple typically rejects all applications that even smell like BitTorrent clients.

The IS drive app allows for users to queue up uploads and downloads to your IS Drive account while on the go and this app allows users to do exactly that. While currently you can't add your own sources, the author may do so in the future. As he states, "I’ll probably add a search feature where it’s up to the user to manually add the torrent site they want. The app will not be designed to easily break the law and I hope no one intends to do so. But if a user is determined to break the law, what business is that of mine or Apple’s? They could do the same in Safari anyway, right?"

While its doubtful that we will see pure BitTorrent clients on the App Store anytime soon, this could hopefully be a step in the right direction as torrents can be used for good when used appropriately.

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44 Comments

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I think the news poster missed out on the last two weeks or has been under a rock. Apple relaxed its TOS for the application approval process. So no Apple isn't having a "change of heart" just for this application. They've been letting a lot of applications through and have had across the board relaxed policies now in the last two weeks. Although bit torrent may still be against it, the article makes it sound as if Apple is still implementing it's strick policies.

When tech websites make a news article spilling an app's secrets, THAT is why things get pulled from the app store.

Download it while you can, folks.

Still don't see the point since most torrent apps have built in web interfaces now that allow you to monitor your torrents from anywhere in the world.. this would be useful if you where going to watch whatever it is you downloaded on your iphone/ iPad.

Great, but ... I'm wondering what someone's going to do with a torrent app on an iPhone or iPad ? There isn't even a way to manage files.

PsykX said,
Great, but ... I'm wondering what someone's going to do with a torrent app on an iPhone or iPad ? There isn't even a way to manage files.

Read the article.

xbamaris said,
Isnt the whole reason AT&T cut back on the "unlimited plan" was because people were abusing the bandwidth?

hmm, there is WIFI, I think 3G would be too slow anyway

xbamaris said,
Isnt the whole reason AT&T cut back on the "unlimited plan" was because people were abusing the bandwidth?

This app doesn't do any actual "bittorrenting", it just allows you to view and control what's being downloaded on imageshack, so its sort of like the uTorrent web interface.

kInG aLeXo said,

This app doesn't do any actual "bittorrenting", it just allows you to view and control what's being downloaded on imageshack, so its sort of like the uTorrent web interface.

Exactly. ImageShack's servers are doing the seeding/leeching.

Shadrack said,

2.5-3.5mbps is too slow for BitTorrent? Since when?

AT&T 3G maxes out at 1.5Mbit but their proxy/firewall would prevent it from working anyways. Trust me I tried when I had an aircard. You can download but you can't seed back.

shinji257 said,

AT&T 3G maxes out at 1.5Mbit but their proxy/firewall would prevent it from working anyways. Trust me I tried when I had an aircard. You can download but you can't seed back.

In my area I get consistently >1.5mbps and it is normally >3mbps both upstream and downstream. That's based on speedtest so maybe I'm just missing something. Other than a lousy ping web pages load very fast.

warwagon said,
Great, but I still won't touch a torrent with a 10 foot pole

torrents are safe if it's posted by a green/pink skull member with a lot of comments.

s3n4te said,

torrents are safe if it's posted by a green/pink skull member with a lot of comments.


The Pirate Bay. It is the BitTorrent.

s3n4te said,

torrents are safe if it's posted by a green/pink skull member with a lot of comments.

So then you won't get a letter from the MPAA or RIAA or your ISP ?

warwagon said,

So then you won't get a letter from the MPAA or RIAA or your ISP ?

They don't really do that as long as you're not constantly uploading or creating torrents. I know that in Belgium for example they just don't do it in any case, ISP refuses to and the copyright whatever things don't have access to the usage data.

I've never used bittorrent much, but I had my cable Internet shut off, twice, because I downloaded a few episodes of TV shows through bittorrent. I don't use it at all anymore; I have Netflix now anyway...

warwagon said,
Great, but I still won't touch a torrent with a 10 foot pole

Stay away from public torrent sites and you'll be fine.

Ambroos said,

They don't really do that as long as you're not constantly uploading or creating torrents. I know that in Belgium for example they just don't do it in any case, ISP refuses to and the copyright whatever things don't have access to the usage data.

Good to know that I live in Belgium!

bb10 said,

Peerblock is imaginary "protection". It blocks random ip ranges for no reason at all.

Sorry, you're wrong. It's not 100% perfect, but it does a very good job at keeping known IPs from connecting to your system.

warwagon said,

So then you won't get a letter from the MPAA or RIAA or your ISP ?

I've torrented for years & I've never received a letter from my ISP, the RIAA or MPAA, I'm either lucky or my ISP isn't very observant.

warwagon said,
Great, but I still won't touch a torrent with a 10 foot pole

Usenet over SSL. Bit torrent is an inconsistent means of getting stuff down, unless your getting stuff with a tonne of seeders it takes far too long, and you've got the possibly they could just turn off their computers or stop seeding.

warwagon said,

So then you won't get a letter from the MPAA or RIAA or your ISP ?

You do realise that file sharing sites keep traffic logs right? one knock from the RIAA/MPAA and they would probably fork the data over unquestioningly. Torrents are usually targeted because viewing the IP addresses in the swarm are easy and you don't need law enforcement to serve subpoenas, but file hosting sites are not safe by any means, and eventually those will be targeted.

Subject Delta said,

You do realise that file sharing sites keep traffic logs right? one knock from the RIAA/MPAA and they would probably fork the data over unquestioningly. Torrents are usually targeted because viewing the IP addresses in the swarm are easy and you don't need law enforcement to serve subpoenas, but file hosting sites are not safe by any means, and eventually those will be targeted.

But arent most file sharing sites located outside the us?

bb10 said,

Peerblock is imaginary "protection". It blocks random ip ranges for no reason at all.

Also, warwagon, torrents are not only used for warez.


What protection do you recommend if peerblock is imaginary?

warwagon said,
Great, but I still won't touch a torrent with a 10 foot pole

Torrents are relatively safe assuming you use proper protection (an ip block list of known interested parties) and get it from safe sources. There is still a small risk of infection but that is true for any location on the internet.

shinji257 said,

Torrents are relatively safe assuming you use proper protection (an ip block list of known interested parties) and get it from safe sources. There is still a small risk of infection but that is true for any location on the internet.

Not worried about infection, i'm worried about getting a letter. Which is ok, I haven't used torrents in 3 years.

warwagon said,
Not worried about infection, i'm worried about getting a letter. Which is ok, I haven't used torrents in 3 years.
You are really missing out. LOL As long you know how to stay off the black list of your ISP and others watching browsing habits, you are good in their books. Hell, that's how I do it.

The Visitors said,

I never trusted that program.

I once was told that the RIAA & MPAA made that program. Who else would they know "their" IP's unless someone was caught or working inside them?

You do realize it's open source, right? Go take a look at the code yourself.

warwagon said,
Great, but I still won't touch a torrent with a 10 foot pole

hotdog963al said,
Damn straight, but let the idiots keep using it

Cool story, sis.
So, no World of Warcraft, Starcraft II and otther games for you? If you're so damn smart you obviously know that they use BitTorrent for all downloads.