Apple OS X Lion to hit App Store tomorrow

It was rumored to be happening after signage for Lion was delivered to Apple's retailed stores, and now we've got confirmation. During Apple's earning call this morning, the company's CFO, Peter Oppenheimer, confirmed that Mac OS 10.7 or "Lion" will be landing in the Mac App Store tomorrow. 

According to Engadget, the new OS will be available for $30USD and will be a 4GB download, and the server edition (Named "Lion Server") will also be available tomorrow for $50. The new OS from Apple brings many new features to the table and also brings a bit of iOS flare to it as well. Many believe that this will be the start of the convergence of the OS X experience into that of the iOS world.

Initially, stores will not offer a physical version of Lion and instead will sell App Store cards so users can purchase the OS from the App Store. Rumor also suggests that the much anticipated refresh of the MacBook Air line will be made available tomorrow, and additional rumors suggest the Mac Mini and LED Cinema Display may see new models too.

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28 Comments

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My gf has a C2D iMac. Can't remember the speed, but it's the older 20" model. I presume it would still meet the minimum specs for Lion?

Pegus said,
My gf has a C2D iMac. Can't remember the speed, but it's the older 20" model. I presume it would still meet the minimum specs for Lion?

yes it will

this is a minor part of the article but I do hope other follow up on the trend of not using retail disks anymore... it's such a waste of resources when we can just download the installation.

Agreed. Microsoft are slowly moving in that direction, too - I used their tool to create a bootable USB installer from an ISO of my retail disc the other day. It'd be nice if Windows 8 allowed you to upgrade-in-place without a separate boot disc like Lion does.

Dinggus said,
Guess I'll have to buy OSX Lion beginning of 2012 4GB is to big of a download on this internet.

Why is that? why don't you just let it download over night or whilst you're out? even on a relatively slow internet connection it should only take a few of hours at the most.

Mr Nom Nom's said,

Why is that? why don't you just let it download over night or whilst you're out? even on a relatively slow internet connection it should only take a few of hours at the most.

I get anywhere from 1kb/s-23kb/s. Believe me, I want to get it.

Pink Floyd said,
I have it installed on my MBP 2011 and working flawlessly. Now I am waiting on iCloud to replace MobileMe and iOS 5 as well

iCloud isn't replacing iOS 5

smooth3006 said,
not sure if ill upgrade to this on my osx86 install or not yet. tbh ive grown fond of windows again lol.

me too... windows 7 really did bring things up to speed.

After upgrading from Leopard to Snow Leopard my C2D Mini slowed so much, it is nearly useless. I think I will pass. As per usual, Apple will require the latest OS to use their dev tools a month or two after the new OS is released, so that will end another connection I have with Apple.

nohone said,
After upgrading from Leopard to Snow Leopard my C2D Mini slowed so much, it is nearly useless. I think I will pass. As per usual, Apple will require the latest OS to use their dev tools a month or two after the new OS is released, so that will end another connection I have with Apple.

Same thing happened to me. Microsoft offers a much better support period for their operating systems, so I'm in the process of ditching my remaining Apple products.

nohone said,
After upgrading from Leopard to Snow Leopard my C2D Mini slowed so much, it is nearly useless. I think I will pass. As per usual, Apple will require the latest OS to use their dev tools a month or two after the new OS is released, so that will end another connection I have with Apple.

Did you do an upgrade or fresh install? I upgraded Snow Leopard to Lion GM, and it was dog slow. Wiping the hard drive, and doing a fresh install of Lion made it run a lot better.

bogd said,

Did you do an upgrade or fresh install? I upgraded Snow Leopard to Lion GM, and it was dog slow. Wiping the hard drive, and doing a fresh install of Lion made it run a lot better.

Really?...hmmm. I was hoping to just do an upgrade. If I do a clean install, can I just reload all my apps and data from my Time Machine backup? Or would restoring from my backup negate the clean installation efforts? Thanks.

bogd said,

Did you do an upgrade or fresh install? I upgraded Snow Leopard to Lion GM, and it was dog slow. Wiping the hard drive, and doing a fresh install of Lion made it run a lot better.

Should it make a difference? Not trying to start a flame war here, but we keep hearing about how easy Macs are to use as compared to their competition. I could probably find all my data, move it off to a external HDD, wipe the HDD, reinstall the OS and all my programs. But isn't this what Apple fans laugh about Windows over, how you need to reinstall everything every year or two?

Maybe that is how Apple reaps huge profits - screw over the machine so badly with an upgrade that the average person (with the money to do so) just buys a new one.

nohone said,

Should it make a difference? Not trying to start a flame war here, but we keep hearing about how easy Macs are to use as compared to their competition. I could probably find all my data, move it off to a external HDD, wipe the HDD, reinstall the OS and all my programs. But isn't this what Apple fans laugh about Windows over, how you need to reinstall everything every year or two?

Maybe that is how Apple reaps huge profits - screw over the machine so badly with an upgrade that the average person (with the money to do so) just buys a new one.

Not that I necessarily disagree with you; an upgrade should be no different from a clean install. But I am going to point out that having to do a clean install over an upgrade is not the same as having to reinstall every year or two.

Shadrack said,

Not that I necessarily disagree with you; an upgrade should be no different from a clean install. But I am going to point out that having to do a clean install over an upgrade is not the same as having to reinstall every year or two.

id say for lion people should fresh/clean install.

Shadrack said,

Really?...hmmm. I was hoping to just do an upgrade. If I do a clean install, can I just reload all my apps and data from my Time Machine backup? Or would restoring from my backup negate the clean installation efforts? Thanks.

Learning from my experience, doing a complete restore from Time Machine would negate the clean installation. I tried it several months ago with Snow Leopard because I noticed the system's performance was taking a dive, and I basically wasted my time because the system was still choking on things it shouldn't choke on.

As I mentioned earlier, when I did a straight upgrade from Snow Leopard to Lion GM, I was getting spinning beach balls thrown at me after every click I made. So I just backed up my data, cleaned SL off of the hard drive, and installed Lion down to it. Instead of doing a partial Time Machine restore, I just dragged and dropped my Apps, Pictures, Music, Documents etc, back down to the main drive and set it up like you would a new machine.

It is a bit tedious, and it takes a few hours, but the end justified the means. System animations run smoother and the machine boots faster.

Shadrack said,

Should it make a difference? Not trying to start a flame war here, but we keep hearing about how easy Macs are to use as compared to their competition. I could probably find all my data, move it off to a external HDD, wipe the HDD, reinstall the OS and all my programs. But isn't this what Apple fans laugh about Windows over, how you need to reinstall everything every year or two?

Maybe that is how Apple reaps huge profits - screw over the machine so badly with an upgrade that the average person (with the money to do so) just buys a new one.

It makes a difference. I think it's better to clean the old OS off and put the new one on instead of updating the old to new. If you just update, any problems you have with your system will remain but they will have a new version number attached to it.

I'm probably telling you stuff you already know, but the computer accumulates a lot of crap over the year(s). Especially mine. I constantly install programs to try them out, then uninstall them when I was through. But sometime, an app just won't die.

I'm an Apple fan, but I'm not a cultist, so I recommend that users back up all of their data, and perform a clean install of the OS when a new version of the OS comes out or whenever they see fit. Regardless of what OS they're using. (Ubuntu maybe the exception because there's an update twice a year.) I have friends who do it every 6 months, but I would only do it when I realized that the system wasn't running like it use too.

I think any reasonable Apple fan would recommend the same thing.

Edited by benthebear, Jul 20 2011, 1:59am :

Enron said,
Same thing happened to me. Microsoft offers a much better support period for their operating systems, so I'm in the process of ditching my remaining Apple products.

If Apple were so desperate to get rid of support for old operating systems then could you please explain to me why they're providing Xcode 4.2 for Mac OS X Snow Leopard?

Microsoft offers a much better support period? sure, because their software costs more! good lord, do you actually look at the price tag of their software or do you just walk to a shop and grab the first box within reaching distance that has 'Microsoft' on the front? If you want to see horrible support policy then look no further than Adobe! Adobe makes Apple look like the all time champion of legacy support given how easy Adobe ignores its old releases!

nohone said,
Should it make a difference? Not trying to start a flame war here, but we keep hearing about how easy Macs are to use as compared to their competition. I could probably find all my data, move it off to a external HDD, wipe the HDD, reinstall the OS and all my programs. But isn't this what Apple fans laugh about Windows over, how you need to reinstall everything every year or two?

Why back up your applications - the only important stuff to back up your documents, music etc. and then clean install the rest - you're telling me that 1-2 hours re-installing every couple of years is such a horrific experience? you would be doing the same thing with Windows when push comes to shove - there is no such thing as a flawless upgrade on any operating system whether it be Mac OS X, Windows or some *NIX out there (believe me, upgrade from one version to the next and see all hell break loose as the latest version of GNOME goes crazy trying to migrate the old settings files over to the new environment).

Oh, and the laugh by the way had nothing to do with upgrading and everything to do with slow downs in the operating system requiring a fresh install once every few months, the joke was never about upgrading. The argument was based on the 'registry rot' legend which has been proven time and time again to be wholly inaccurate and an old wives tale - if you don't screw around with the internals of Windows, keep away from dodgy third party vendors with crappy installers/uninstallers then your experience should be roughly equal to that of a Mac OS X user.

For me I choose to run Mac OS X because that is what I prefer - the interface layout, installing applications, the appstore integration with i-devices, the great third party applications that polished and integrated etc.

Maybe that is how Apple reaps huge profits - screw over the machine so badly with an upgrade that the average person (with the money to do so) just buys a new one.

Apple cannot guarantee that the applications you have installed aren't linking into private frameworks which they themselves have said that third parties should no use under any circumstance - I'm sure you remember the 'Application Enhancer Framework' that causes a whole host of headaches for Leopard upgraders. How do you avoid things that use the private frameworks - purchase as much of your applications through the AppStore which have a policy of rejecting any application that links against a private framework (which is the reason why Microsoft Office and Adobe are so horrible on Mac OS X - they insist on using their own technology by linking against private API's instead of using the technology that is already provided).

nohone said,
After upgrading from Leopard to Snow Leopard my C2D Mini slowed so much, it is nearly useless. I think I will pass. As per usual, Apple will require the latest OS to use their dev tools a month or two after the new OS is released, so that will end another connection I have with Apple.

Shouldn't happen. Snow Leopard is Leopard, but optimized. Like they said, do a clean install maybe.

I'll probably try an upgrade and see how it goes for a couple days. Just to be another data point. I suspect this weekend I'll be doing a clean install.

Come to think of it, the last OS upgrade that worked great from a upgrade was MS-DOS 5->6.

Shadrack said,
I'll probably try an upgrade and see how it goes for a couple days. Just to be another data point. I suspect this weekend I'll be doing a clean install.

Come to think of it, the last OS upgrade that worked great from a upgrade was MS-DOS 5->6.

But that was a very simple operating system with limited hooks in which third parties could screw things around - it is a brave new world these days and there is a heck of a lot more that can go wrong even with all the greatest testers available. With Lion burn the InstallESD.dmg to a DVD and call it a day - that is how I installed the GM of Lion (from the developer site) on my computer when it was released; it takes a little longer but it is well worth it given the clean slate that it is installed onto.

Mr Nom Nom's said,

If Apple were so desperate to get rid of support for old operating systems then could you please explain to me why they're providing Xcode 4.2 for Mac OS X Snow Leopard?

And a bunch of other crap clipped...

I have a total of 3 applications installed that are not installed by default (or updated by the OS such as iTunes): Office 2008, FireFox, and XCode. With that little installed, after upgrading to a point release of an OS I would expect my computer to not slow down to where I launch Safari, I have to sit and watch the spinning pinwheel. As for XCode, iis not about the version of XCode, but the version of their OS. For iOS development they quickly, within months, required SL to run. I would expect XCode to be slower as it is a large memory and CPU intensive program, but iTunes, Safari, FF, should not be as slow as it became after upgrading the OS.

I am probably going to reformat the computer, and install Win for a little media center. I tried OSX to see how it worked out, and for me, it didn't. And all the raving about how great OSX/Mac is, I just did not see it.

warwagon said,
Regardless if it installs, should the retail Disc boot to on a PC where we should at least see some text?

I'm assuming this comment wasn't meant for this article? There is no retail disc..