Apple Overtakes Dell in UK Education Sales

Apple is the number two supplier to UK education market, pushing Dell into third place. According to analysts at Gartner, Apple has 14.7 per cent of the total PC market for education - including laptops and desktop computers, but excluding the server market. In first place is Research Machines with 34.9 per cent of the market. Dell has slipped to third place with 14.1 per cent. In fourth place is HP with 7.7 per cent of the market.

Apple also announced that in the fourth quarter of its 2006 financial year it was the number one computer supplier in the Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) education market. Gartner analyst Isabelle Durand confirmed the news. She told Macworld: "For the first time, Apple is number one in the EMEA education market with 11.6 per cent of the market in Q3/2006 against 9.6 per cent in Q3/2005."

She added: "Apple performed above the education market average (+9.2 per cent) and grew by 32 per cent in the EMEA education market." Durand believes Apple's growth in the education market is being driven by promotions. According to Durand, Apple is "offering large discounts to direct channel on notebook and desktops." She also claims that Apple's MacBook recorded high volumes. "It has been quite successful into the education sector", she said.

News source: Macworld UK

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Pro Evo Scores

Next Story

Microsoft to Launch Office Live Nov 15th

31 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Well, most dells that schools buy suck because they buy the chapest ones. I would rather have a mac than a low end dell.

Quote - rm20010 said @ #10
Research Machines? Never heard of them.
RM supply specifically to UK schools; no-one in this country had heard of them until they partnered with Tesco to supply "free" computers to schools (which actually cost around £100,000+ Don't ask! )

Quote - _BeanZ_ said @ #10.1
RM supply specifically to UK schools; no-one in this country had heard of them until they partnered with Tesco to supply "free" computers to schools (which actually cost around £100,000+ Don't ask! )

Well they have been supplying the UK education sector a lot longer than the Tesco scheme has been going (20+ years) and were certainly the biggest supplier when I started at secondary school 14 years ago. They also supply universities with PCs as well as servers and they also have an education centric ISP. Personally I like to see more competition in the sector but the big companies like Apple and Dell don't have the same tailored service that RM provides.

As for the £100,000+ price per school on the computer for schools scheme, do you have any evidence to back that claim up as I’m sure the government would like to hear about it.

Quote - RandyC said @ #10.2
As for the £100,000+ price per school on the computer for schools scheme, do you have any evidence to back that claim up as I’m sure the government would like to here about it.

I didn't make the original claim - but I asume the poster meant you need to spend £x (is it £10?) at Tescos to get one 'Computer for Schools' voucher. I don't know how many vouchers you need to get one computer, but I expect it is a large enough number to make it seem like you are spending £100,000 to get one computer! ;-)

I can't see why the government would like to hear about this anyway. They are the ones who are supposed to be providing facilities for schools and the fact that they are relying on charity handouts (as usual) probably means they don't give a ... ;-p

W.

Quote - RandyC said @ #10.2
Well they have been supplying the UK education sector a lot longer than the Tesco scheme has been going (20+ years)...
I stand corrected on that one; personally have never seen any pre Computers for Schools RM kit.

Quote - RandyC said @ #10.2
As for the £100,000+ price per school on the computer for schools scheme, do you have any evidence to back that claim up as I’m sure the government would like to hear about it.
1 voucher for every £10 spent in store (give or take the occasional bonus voucher promotion) - the cheapest PC this year was 12,000 vouchers (Celeron 2.6, 256MB RAM, 17" CRT), so a single computer requires well over £100,000 to be spent in store

Well Apples are considerably cheaper in the education market. It makes sense, thats where I got my MacBook.

Well they're not winning in my county - here it's more along the lines of...

1. Dell
2. RM
3. HP/Compaq
4. Apple

I only know of 2 schools off hand who have Macs, and within those schools they are vastly outnumbered by Windows machines.

After Apple came to Lithuania, now mostly what I see in school is iPod, and on TV again iPod... If I find interesting show about computers, again I see MacBook... And everything started just ~6 months back... After trying those things for free, I am going to buy one. I am PC user for ~10 years already, always with Widnows from 95, I even remember Windows 3.1 in old computers.

I am living with Windows "Longhorn" from the first release they made, it was alpha. Now I am trying the latest build from release day. In InfoBalt 2006 I saw that SuSE won against Windows Vista, people just loved Linux and how it can make everything easier.

This is the problem, that I am looking something new and very simple for user. I am tired and after testing Mac... It just can't be easier and more simpler...

It's really good, that Apple is going higher and higher, I would like to see it in the top of all companys.

Quote - b0m8er said @ #5
yeh! apple is overrated and overpriced!
I thought that it was generally considered that apple computers are actually quite often cheaper than the Dell computer that they compare to...

Overrated is clearly a matter of opinion.

No... Apple computers are excellent for the education market. They're user friendly, difficult to corrupt by inexperienced users, and provide a virus and malware free environment (low maintenance).

Uh huh.

But they're NOT what you'd find in the business world...anywhere in the world for that matter (3% marketshare, remember?)

Isn't the point of schooling to educate youth so they can go into the work world?

All that low-maintenance business sounds great on paper but the cost of re-training students to use Windows (Start Menu, task bar, et. al) then falls on to high schools or post-secondary institutions.

All these useless fanboy comments are just sickening and so typical of this website's readership. You have to look at the bigger picture, kids.

Oh, noesss!!!!111eleven

They won't know how to use MS Office! They won't know what that Start button thing is for!

Get real. I think most of them will have some exposure to a Windows PC at some time in their eduacation span. Perhaps on another school computer? Perhaps at their home, on their home PC, or their parent's PC? Perhaps at a friend's house?

To claim that why would not know what a start button is, is laughable!

Quote - raskren said @ #3.2
Uh huh.

But they're NOT what you'd find in the business world...anywhere in the world for that matter (3% marketshare, remember?)

Isn't the point of schooling to educate youth so they can go into the work world?

All that low-maintenance business sounds great on paper but the cost of re-training students to use Windows (Start Menu, task bar, et. al) then falls on to high schools or post-secondary institutions.

All these useless fanboy comments are just sickening and so typical of this website's readership. You have to look at the bigger picture, kids.


Luckily you'd be the first person to point out that over 95% of those children go home to a Windows PC.

And you're right! I say we enforce mandatory dress shoes in school. Those velcro shoes aren't going to cut it in the Business world!

Quote - markjensen said @ #3.3

To claim that why would not know what a start button is, is laughable!

I take it you've never taught a Computer Literacy 101 course, have you?

Quote - raskren said @ #3.5
I take it you've never taught a Computer Literacy 101 course, have you?
Perhaps you don't realize that teaching the kids how to use the computer is part of the classes in school already? I have four young boys in school, so I am pretty well aware of what they are being taught. And I instruct robotics courses where I work, so I am aware of technical education, as well.

Not sure what your question's point is. Perhaps if you clarify where you believe my deficiencies to be, I can respond more directly.

Quote - raskren said @ #3.5
I take it you've never taught a Computer Literacy 101 course, have you?

And I'd bet it's a fair wager to assume that the vast majority of those classes are occupied by grown adults who were in grade school long before the PC age.

Quote - raskren said @ #3.5

I take it you've never taught a Computer Literacy 101 course, have you?

Apparently, you've only seen BAD computer courses.

Children shouldn't learn about 'Microsoft Office', they should learn about 'Office Suites'. They shouldn't learn about 'Microsoft Windows XP', they should learn about 'Operating Systems'.

Why? Because computer environments change!
If children know about the types of programs, and how to find out more about them, they'll adapt quicker.

Quote - Mathiasdm said @ #3.8

Apparently, you've only seen BAD computer courses.

Children shouldn't learn about 'Microsoft Office', they should learn about 'Office Suites'. They shouldn't learn about 'Microsoft Windows XP', they should learn about 'Operating Systems'.

Why? Because computer environments change!
If children know about the types of programs, and how to find out more about them, they'll adapt quicker.

Exactly. I used Apple computers from 1st grade (AppleIIE, lol) up through high school and I used a PC at home. This is one of the reasons I am so computer literate today. I know what an OS is and what different options I have in terms of word processing and other productivity suites. For those who grow up using nothing but Windows and MS Office there seems to be a smaller percentage of people who can say the same.

Quote - raskren said @ #3.2
Uh huh.
Isn't the point of schooling to educate youth so they can go into the work world?

This is a major misconception - the objective is not to teach children how to use computers, but to use computers to teach children. So you want the platform that's easiest to use and doesn't get in the way of the edumacatin'.
Macs have the best value-add for digital media stuff too, with iLife.

This shouldn't be a shock to anyone - Apple has always had a strong foothold in the education market... at least, in elementary schools.

I was particularly impressed with the computer labs when I went to University - they offered both Mac labs and PC labs so students were free to use whatever they preferred; not what the institution thought was "best".