Apple Refuses Cash For iPhones

Apple Inc. no longer accepts cash for iPhone purchases and now limits sales of the cell phone to two per person in a move to stop people from reselling them.

The new policy started Thursday, said Apple spokeswoman Natalie Kerris. Before then, there was no cash restriction and the purchase limit was five per person.

"Customer response to the iPhone has been off the charts, and limiting iPhone sales to two per customer helps us ensure that there are enough iPhones for people who are shopping for themselves or buying a gift," Kerris said. "We're requiring a credit or debit card for payment to discourage unauthorized resellers."

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Despite the fact that this phone needs a lot of work to be a business class phone, doesn't this stated practice make purchases by businesses a royal pain in the rear? Or...is Apple conceding that this phone is strictly for privte use?

What a wonderful world we live in when companies can decide for you how many of their product they will sell you, and then also require only one form of payment when money is legal tender.

Sounds arrogant to me, whatever happened to companies adhering to consumer demand?

Neobond said,
What a wonderful world we live in when companies can decide for you how many of their product they will sell you, and then also require only one form of payment when money is legal tender.

Sounds arrogant to me, whatever happened to companies adhering to consumer demand?

Some would argue that to get the best product, you must pay the price... be it NOT paying with cash, ONLY having the option to purchase two phones, selling your sole... etc.

I think people will soon the the ways of Mr. Jobs and Co. It's all about LOCK DOWN, even AFTER the product is yours.

Neobond said,
What a wonderful world we live in when companies can decide for you how many of their product they will sell you, and then also require only one form of payment when money is legal tender.

Sounds arrogant to me, whatever happened to companies adhering to consumer demand?

What I find really funny about this is what I found funny about the Dell situation.

It is entirely illegal to refuse cash in any retail situation as a form of payment while accepting another.

There's a difference between arrogance and protecting your product from illegal export. Are Nintendo and resellers of the Wii arrogant for limiting sales of the Wii per person?

My cousing got a *cracked* one over the Internet from a company that sell them via a web page online for something around 600 euro and in USA I've heard one is 300$ or something simillar. Haha!

As long there is demand there will be people to legaly or not will supply them. I for one would have made more deals with phone stores in Europe, Asia, and so on. This way people will stop buying this cracked version offering a way to big price for it.

So, what I want to say is that it's Apple's fault after all. I honestly doubt they break any laws by doing this, (if I'm not mistaken) take Ferrari for instance. They won't sell you a car unless you follow some strict rules or something anyway.

http://azlegalhlep.org/viewquestions.cfm?m...=34&qid=231

also http://www.federalreserve.gov/generalinfo/faq/faqcur.htm#2

Is U.S. currency legal tender for all debts?

According to the "Legal Tender Statute" (section 5103 of title 31 of the U.S. Code), "United States coins and currency (including Federal Reserve notes and circulating notes of Federal Reserve banks and national banks) are legal tender for all debts, public charges, taxes, and dues." This means that all U.S. money, as identified above, when tendered to a creditor legally satisfies a debt to the extent of the amount (face value) tendered.

However, no federal law mandates that a person or an organization must accept currency or coins as payment for goods or services not yet provided. For example, a bus line may prohibit payment of fares in pennies or dollar bills.

Some movie theaters, convenience stores and gas stations as a matter of policy may refuse to accept currency of a large denomination, such as notes above $20, and as long as notice is posted and a transaction giving rise to a debt has not already been completed, these organizations have not violated the legal tender law.

AT&T can't be happy with whats going on with the iphone, a recent estimate was that at least 200,000 are cracked open and considering you can now buy hundreds of cracked and hebrew supporting iphones right here in Israel , I guess the numbers of cracked iphones might be higher than anyone estimated.

Future iPhone providers in Europe can't be thrilled about this either I assume.

I just wonder now... isn't it illegal to refuse cash? in my country , it is illegal to refuse cash but obviously the law in the US might be diffrent.

First - providers would be morons if they thought the phones would never be cracked, or that they would never be bought for the purpose of cracking... in fact they'd be down right stupid

Second -EDIT - should have read further below

bangbang023 said,
That's a silly statement to make. Working in retail myself, I can assure you that a lot of people pay in cash.

Working for one of the largest retail outlets in the states I have to say that some people do pay with cash but most pay with cards be it credit or debit. And when paying for high dollar items almost all opt for the plastic.

Maybe just limiting two per people and requiring them to activate the phone on purchase with said name would have been enough, especially for those of us who dont have cc's... didnt want one of these yet anywho but eh.