Apple releases Flashback malware removal update

Several days after it was first announced that a malware program called Flashback had infected hundreds of thousands of Mac PCs, Apple has now released a patch that is designed to remove the malware threat. The download is now available for Mac OS 10.6 and 10.7 via its automatic software updater.

Apple's support page offers more information about the download. Basically, it's an update for the Mac's Java support, which downloads a new version, Java SE 6 1.6.0_31. The new version supersedes all previous versions of Java for OS X 10.7. In addition to removing Flashback, the update also sets the Java web plug-in program to disable the automatic execution of any Java applets.

Users can manually go into the Java Preferences settings and restart the automatic launch of web Java applets if they wish. However, they should be aware that the Flashback malware infects a Mac PC by loading a Java applet.

As we reported earlier this week, any people that own Macs that still run OS X 10.5 or below should disable Java on their web browser in order to avoid getting hit by the Flashback malware. The program is one of the biggest security threats ever found for a Mac-based PC.

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12 Comments

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I have a theory that the ppl who make these exploit toolkits have like 50 more vulnerabilities they havent told anyone about. Every time Java is patched, they just use a new one. Youre always vulnerable once you have Java installed.

Beyond Godlike said,
I have a theory that the ppl who make these exploit toolkits have like 50 more vulnerabilities they havent told anyone about. Every time Java is patched, they just use a new one. Youre always vulnerable once you have Java installed.

It's not a theory, it's the truth. Although so many people don't install updates that they don't even have to worry about it getting patched.

Their marketing department always knows how to push the old customers over the edge by upgrading towards a newer version of Mac OS X in order to be 'virus free'. But still, it's a Java thing, something that should be patched for free too on older versions.

Not that I am a complainer, I have the latest version but I was wondering.

'Ricardo said,
Their marketing department always knows how to push the old customers over the edge by upgrading towards a newer version of Mac OS X in order to be 'virus free'. But still, it's a Java thing, something that should be patched for free too on older versions.

Not that I am a complainer, I have the latest version but I was wondering.


Apple has never cared about its customers who are a over a generation behind. This has been the case for 10+ years.

MrHumpty said,

Apple has never cared about its customers who are a over a generation behind. This has been the case for 10+ years.

That's funny because 1st generation iPods STILL work with iTunes.

torrentthief said,
it is around 70mb to remove the malware, crazily big!

It is probably patching the security hole as well as removing any infection.

Java and Flash are the 2 most common cause of infections in recent years. Microsoft and Apple have to take the bad name and blame for it.

sanke1 said,
Java and Flash are the 2 most common cause of infections in recent years. Microsoft and Apple have to take the bad name and blame for it.

Apple more than Microsoft. Microsoft doesn't maintain Java or Flash. Apple maintains their own version of Java... that's how they got into this mess in the first place [Flashback malware].

rfirth said,

Apple more than Microsoft. Microsoft doesn't maintain Java or Flash. Apple maintains their own version of Java... that's how they got into this mess in the first place [Flashback malware].

True, but didn't Sun sue MS for their Java implementation forcing MS to drop support? And Sun Java has just as many security problems, but more than that it has user annoyance problems.