Apple reveals details on new Time Capsule models

For those with a Mac who are avid fans of backing up their data, Apple has unveiled details on their new backup device which they have cleverly named Time Capsule. The new models that will become available soon offer a storage capacity of either 2TB or 3TB.

After several rumours on what new features the Time Capsule will have were listed on several technology websites, it's clear that Apple have made some welcome changes to the device but doesn't necessarily bring a fundamental shift in its functionality. In comparison to previous models, the new Time Capsule primarily improves features such as faster connection and backup speed, in addition to the bump in storage space.

The prices that Apple currently have listed for the devices start at $299; the same price that was used for the 1TB model that was first released over three years ago. The Time Capsule boasts dual-band 802.11n wireless connectivity with the ability of using a USB port to allow sharing of a printer over the network. This therefore makes the Time Capsule a rare product of having both a network base station and a backup facility in one device.

Back in 2009, Apple admitted that there were certain issues with some of the devices after people complained that they were turning themselves off. The company offered free repairs or replacements for those sold between February and June 2008.

Image Source: apple.com

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Stewart Gilligan Griffin said,
I don't have one of these, but is it a true backup device? meanining not just a copy but has more then one HDD in it and does RAID1, 10, or 5? if not I wouldn't trust it to back up anything.... had too many "external" devices fail in the past that didn't mirror data...

http://store.westerndigital.co...rid.13092300/catid.13092900
It has 2 HDD in RAID for almost the same price and it works with MACs Time Machine..

Stewart Gilligan Griffin said,
my point is, I've seen way to many people think these are an end all to backup... I know a bunch of photographers that think all their images are safe because they backed them up to a device like this... and trying to educate them that if its not a mirrored set if one drive fails you are still screwed seems impossible... I've goten a few people to switch to networked backup storage that has at least 2 drives like western digital has a couple in the mybook line... but if apple truely wanted to be an innovator, but a 2nd drive in there or an option for one and mirror the thing... make the tech more common place, its not like its hard to do!
If you're backing up, then you have your photos on your computer and on your Time Capsule. For 98% of people, that's more backup than they'll ever need.

For hardcore photographers who make their living off of it, if they aren't doing off site, redundant storage, they're asking for trouble. For the home consumer who has some music, home photos and documents to back up? This is fine.

But you are not screwed if the Time Capsule fails. You are only screwed if the Time Capsule fails simultaneously with a hard drive failure in your computer. That's about as likely as a RAID 1 mirror having a simultaneous failure on both hard drives. Would you have even MORE redundancy if it was a RAID 1 setup? Sure... you could also buy 2 Time Capsules, or 2 external hard drives to setup with Time Machine. You need even MORE redundancy? Buy 3.... etc. etc.

What makes me laugh are people who think that RAID 1 setups are good backup solutions for workstations (in-and-of-themselves). Thats dumb, because if your system files or personal files becomes corrupt on one then they becomes corrupt on both. RAID-1 may protect you against a hard drive failure, but not if there is a problem between the user and the keyboard. RAID-1 is for up-time protection, not so much for data protection.

Apple's Time Machine is brilliant for the consumer space (no matter what you use with it, be it Time Capsule or some external USB drive). Something that just works when you set it up, and then it takes care of itself. I think Time Capsule is overpriced, personally, but not because it lacks RAID 1 (lol).

AgentGray said,

Windows Home Server.


Windows Home Server is not a standalone backup device, it is, as the name implies, a home server. There is a huge difference between the two.

Stewart Gilligan Griffin said,
my point is, I've seen way to many people think these are an end all to backup... I know a bunch of photographers that think all their images are safe because they backed them up to a device like this... and trying to educate them that if its not a mirrored set if one drive fails you are still screwed seems impossible...

It sounds to me as if those idiot photographers are storing their photos ONLY on the backup device. That is not a "backup", that is remote storage. Not the same thing. As Simon said (LOL), for most people, keeping the files on their computer as well as on an external backup drive (even a single disk model such as a Time Capsule) is usually enough.

Shadrack said,
Something that just works when you set it up, and then it takes care of itself.

Wasn't there a time that Time Capsules were corrupting data quite regularly and Apple would replace the device, but your data was toast? Has that been fixed?

nohone said,

Wasn't there a time that Time Capsules were corrupting data quite regularly and Apple would replace the device, but your data was toast? Has that been fixed?

I'm not sure. But the sentence you quoted was in regards to Time Machine, not Time Capsule. Maybe this from the actual article may answer that question for you:

Back in 2009, Apple admitted that there were certain issues with some of the devices after people complained that they were turning themselves off. The company offered free repairs or replacements for those sold between February and June 2008.

roadwarrior said,

Windows Home Server is not a standalone backup device, it is, as the name implies, a home server. There is a huge difference between the two.

windows home server can turn on my computer from sleep and back it up as well as all the data I want

roadwarrior said,
It is a backup device in the sense that it serves as a backup of the data you have stored on your computer. I don't think I've seen any such device (outside of commercial grade equipment) that used multiple hard drives in a RAID array. Certainly nothing in the consumer market, or anywhere near the price we are talking about here.

My PC at work has a Buffalo device which uses 2 discs in a RAID... I'll just try Google a link for it. No idea if they sell it any more as I have had it at least 2 years..

Ah here's the sort of thing:

http://www.pcworldbusiness.co.uk/catalogue/item/A0388553

Don't think mine is a LinkStation though. It's just got a FireWire and USB 2.0 port on the rear and isn't NAS...

Stewart Gilligan Griffin said,
I don't have one of these, but is it a true backup device? meanining not just a copy but has more then one HDD in it and does RAID1, 10, or 5? if not I wouldn't trust it to back up anything.... had too many "external" devices fail in the past that didn't mirror data...
You're confusing backups and hardware redundancy. They're not the same thing.

roadwarrior said,
It is a backup device in the sense that it serves as a backup of the data you have stored on your computer. I don't think I've seen any such device (outside of commercial grade equipment) that used multiple hard drives in a RAID array. Certainly nothing in the consumer market, or anywhere near the price we are talking about here.

Netgear has one.

roadwarrior said,
I don't think I've seen any such device (outside of commercial grade equipment) that used multiple hard drives in a RAID array. Certainly nothing in the consumer market, or anywhere near the price we are talking about here.

There are tons and tons of RAID HDD enclosures for consumers. Two bays for about $100.

Lachlan said,
heres the start of apple charging like 400 bucks for an external hardrive and saying it is so innovative..
Saying this never gets old, does it?

Lachlan said,
heres the start of apple charging like 400 bucks for an external hardrive and saying it is so innovative..

Because a time capsule is obviously just a backup solution. *rolls eyes*

I don't have a time capsule, but I do have an AirPort extreme. It serves as my IPv6 tunnel (AT&T is too lazy to implement it properly) and IPv6 Firewall. If I wanted it to, I could use it as a router for a modem complete with firewall, extremely customizable NAT setup, networked printing device (if you don't have a WiFi enabled printer already), wired router, and the list goes on.

Simon said,
Saying this never gets old, does it?

well its just crazy in my opinion.. I dont mean to offend but it just seems crazy that people accept these huge margins they get.. I am not dissing their product but just the price.. this is why stock brokers love apple because they can squeeze soooooo much out of their fans... These margins are soo huge I personally dont accept it..

I know they sell great products but 3TB harddrive is being sold for $499!!! (as reported by engadget).. Thats the same amount that competitors are selling entire desktops with windows 7 on them.. The most expensive 3TB harddrive on newegg is $160..

Lachlan said,

well its just crazy in my opinion.. I dont mean to offend but it just seems crazy that people accept these huge margins they get.. I am not dissing their product but just the price.. this is why stock brokers love apple because they can squeeze soooooo much out of their fans... These margins are soo huge I personally dont accept it..

I know they sell great products but 3TB harddrive is being sold for $499!!! (as reported by engadget).. Thats the same amount that competitors are selling entire desktops with windows 7 on them.. The most expensive 3TB harddrive on newegg is $160..

Again, it's not just a hard drive.

It could probably be about a hundred dollars less, but it's apple. Seriously, if you actually read the product pages you can see all that it does and the price is much more justifiable. http://www.apple.com/timecapsule/

Lachlan said,

I know they sell great products but 3TB harddrive is being sold for $499!!! (as reported by engadget).. Thats the same amount that competitors are selling entire desktops with windows 7 on them.. The most expensive 3TB harddrive on newegg is $160..

I'm guessing your reading comprehension is pretty poor. Time Capsules are far more than just a hard drive. Perhaps you should read up on exactly what all they do before you make yourself sound even more foolish than you already have.

roadwarrior said,

I'm guessing your reading comprehension is pretty poor. Time Capsules are far more than just a hard drive. Perhaps you should read up on exactly what all they do before you make yourself sound even more foolish than you already have.

As a hardware, Time capsule is a a cheap NAS. end of the story (and the magic).

roadwarrior said,

It is also a print server, a wireless base station, and a gigabit router. So, therefore, NAS is not the "end of the story" when it comes to these.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_Capsule_(Apple)#Features

Exist other NAS to do pretty much the same (Netgear for example) but they are not popular. After all, a decent wifi router with printsever cost about $50.

The advantage of Time Capsule is in the software and their seamless integration with OSX.

"For those with a Mac who are avid fans of backing up their data, Apple has unveiled details on their new backup device which they have cleverly named Time Capsule."

What?

A Time Capsule when Coupled with Time Machine - personally is useful for off disk, time differentiated file copies - (Shadow Copy in the windows world) coupled with a GB Switch, 802.11n Networking and if configured connecting a USB HD or printer. I still prefer a Clone (I use Carbon Copy Cloner) for full disaster level recovery over Time Machine. I wouldn't restore a system from a TM Backup if I had a choice. Even if that choice is Restore or Clean Install.

This also works nicely when integrated with the Win7 Backup routine - although it will just use all the remaining space and not auto-delete like TM does.

My main backups and remote storage are on a 8TB Synology NAS

For what it does - the price point is high - but only when compared to cheap WD "Passport Drives" which give users x storage for their laptops... I will never buy one of those for myself and spend AU$200-300 easily on HD's and Portable Cases for more reliable equipment that isn't integrated together.

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