Apple rumored to adopt gigabit WiFi standard this year

Apple is expected to implement IEEE 802.11ac, the upcoming WiFi standard that can achieve data throughput three times faster than 802.11n, in AirPort base stations, Time Capsule, the oft-rumored Apple TV, notebooks and possibly its mobile devices this year, according to AppleInsider.

IEEE 802.11ac, which operates exclusively on the 5GHz spectrum, is being called "Gigabit WiFi" due to the extreme speeds it can reach by using a combination of technologies including wider channel bandwidths (from 80 to 160MHz compared to 40MHz maximum in 802.11n), more efficient data transfers through sophisticated modulation, and up to eight antennas. Existing standards support up to four antennas, while Apple's Mac computers use up to three.

While 802.11ac is currently still in development and is not set to be fully ratified by IEEE and the WiFi Alliance until the end of 2012, the new WiFi standard is already supported by Broadcom chipsets. Broadcom announced 802.11ac chips at CES this year and is a major supplier of the WiFi chips used in most Apple products. The new chips are backwards compatible with 802.11n and older WiFi standards.

AppleInsider also notes that Apple previously launched hardware supporting the 802.11n standard in early 2007, almost a full three years before the standard was formally ratified in October 2009, so the act of pushing new technology standards is definitely not new to Apple.

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If you don't have a 802.11ac router it won't even matter. And why would you need a gigbit lan at home anyways?

I ran CAT5e in my house and put a surface mount box in each room and my Comcast is hooked to it.. For the iDevices I have, the "N" and that is plenty fast anouth. Until Apple uses faster drives on their devices for moving data, anything faster than USB2.0 right now won;t even matter.

Doubt that as 802.11ac is still not even draft yet AFAIK. Apple is not known for jumping on tech early anyways, see 3G for iPhone and 4G tech that's already final and they still haven't jumped on it yet since they say it's not "mature" yet. I seriously doubt they'll jump on draft even if it was!

SHoTTa35 said,
Doubt that as 802.11ac is still not even draft yet AFAIK. [...] I seriously doubt they'll jump on draft even if it was!
http://www.ieee802.org/11/ http://www.anandtech.com/show/...80211ac-gigabit-wifi-primer
AppleInsider also notes that Apple previously launched hardware supporting the 802.11n standard in early 2007, almost a full three years before the standard was formally ratified in October 2009, so the act of pushing new technology standards is definitely not new to Apple.

That's because they had to. The N standard started in 2002 or somewhere there and still 5yrs later when manufacturers ran out of reasons for you to upgrade your router they started doing Draft 2.0 routers. Apple therefore had to release hardware in their routers and devices to stay competitive otherwise who would by a "54mbps" router when "300Mbps" routers were sitting right beside it for tons less?

Why is this even news? Oh wait its so you can put "Apple" in the title.
..Its like saying there are rumors that I will be adopting Windows 8 when it is released later this year.

sam232 said,
Why is this even news? Oh wait its so you can put "Apple" in the title.
..Its like saying there are rumors that I will be adopting Windows 8 when it is released later this year.

Insecure much?... This is the first news of a company offering ac wireless, so plenty of us like to hear that it's going to be offered this year. Whether it's Apple, Asus, or Alienware, who cares? It is what it is.

Astra.Xtreme said,

Insecure much?... This is the first news of a company offering ac wireless, so plenty of us like to hear that it's going to be offered this year. Whether it's Apple, Asus, or Alienware, who cares? It is what it is.

It's a rumor and all major vendors will eventually support ac. This news goes in my 'no ****, Sherlock' bin.

sam232 said,
Why is this even news? Oh wait its so you can put "Apple" in the title.
..Its like saying there are rumors that I will be adopting Windows 8 when it is released later this year.

I favor a good rumors over any analyst crap any day!

At least rumors often have some root, whilst analysts just... *sigh*

GS:mac

they may have put n wireless in but i thought half the pre-n crap didnt work properly or play nice in the end with certified equipment, so they will put non certified stuff in again b4 the standard is made final?

DKAngel said,
they may have put n wireless in but i thought half the pre-n crap didnt work properly or play nice in the end with certified equipment, so they will put non certified stuff in again b4 the standard is made final?

I was wondering this too. The whole deployment of pre-N and regular N was a mess.

Trueblue711 said,

I was wondering this too. The whole deployment of pre-N and regular N was a mess.

It was? What major routers were incompatible with the end standard? I haven't encountered any.

basic G routers are still great running at 54mbps .. thats more than what ISPs even give you.

.. and N is plenty of b/w already @ 300mbps

most people dont even have gigabit routers unless they are datacenters

ShareShiz said,
basic G routers are still great running at 54mbps .. thats more than what ISPs even give you.

.. and N is plenty of b/w already @ 300mbps

most people dont even have gigabit routers unless they are datacenters


It's quite useful if you consider you'll want to connect to iPhones via wireless connection at some time. You can do now, I know, I do it occasionally when I'm not near the Mac, but it'd be sweet to have the backup and the apps load faster.
(USB2.0 is still 480MBit theoretically, compared to 300MBit/s theoretically)

And yes, there are internet plans well beyond 100MBit even, sometime soon we'll be eligible to use 200MBit/s and that needs a beefy WiFi at home.

Don't forget LAN data shifting and all that.
Have a NAS? You'll adore it and not have to worry too much about whether to use that CAT5 or wireless. (Cause the NAS might be connected via Giga, but is your laptop on the porch? )

GS:mac

ShareShiz said,
basic G routers are still great running at 54mbps .. thats more than what ISPs even give you.

.. and N is plenty of b/w already @ 300mbps

most people dont even have gigabit routers unless they are datacenters


Those are maximum speeds and actual speeds aren't likely to be near their max, especially as the average user is a decent amount of distance from the access point. Also, as 4G phones (sadly) boast faster speeds than home connections in the US, they can take advantage of using those phones as an access point.

ShareShiz said,
basic G routers are still great running at 54mbps .. thats more than what ISPs even give you.

.. and N is plenty of b/w already @ 300mbps

most people dont even have gigabit routers unless they are datacenters

I have a Gigabit router. Wasn't even top of the line, data centres are more likely to be using 10Gbit or faster switches anyways. 802.11N has a Max speed (as defined by spec, individual hardware will vary) of 600Mbit

And finally, I do like to stream HD content over my home network, and that needs more than a G router, especially if something else is also using the wireless, like say my phone

ShareShiz said,
basic G routers are still great running at 54mbps .. thats more than what ISPs even give you.

.. and N is plenty of b/w already @ 300mbps

most people dont even have gigabit routers unless they are datacenters

I would love gig Wifi. Yea, may not make a diff on internet speeds...but a home network transferring data from one system to another on WiFi....would be great to have.

ShareShiz said,
basic G routers are still great running at 54mbps .. thats more than what ISPs even give you.

.. and N is plenty of b/w already @ 300mbps

most people dont even have gigabit routers unless they are datacenters

On a GOOD day, a wireless-G setup will get you a relatively stable 25Mbit(ish) down. My ISP is currently supplying me 50Mbit. They also do a 30Mbit service and over the next year or so, their speeds are doubling to the point where their lowest tier will be 20Mbit, then 60mbit, then 120mbit. Wireless-G just ain't going to cut it and I'm not even sure Wireless-N will be able to cope.

Never mind the fact that connecting wirelessly is more than just your connection speed- streaming and sharing content across the network is vitally important as well. Don't forget "the network" also applies to your work or university network.

good to see Apple is finally following the new range of laptops running Windows. They certainly aren't pushing new technology standards tho, merely adopting existing technology.

dvb2000 said,
good to see Apple is finally following the new range of laptops running Windows. They certainly aren't pushing new technology standards tho, merely adopting existing technology.

What? Do any laptops have Gigabit WiFi yet?

dvb2000 said,
good to see Apple is finally following the new range of laptops running Windows. They certainly aren't pushing new technology standards tho, merely adopting existing technology.

Master of trollery...

GS:mac

dvb2000 said,
good to see Apple is finally following the new range of laptops running Windows. They certainly aren't pushing new technology standards tho, merely adopting existing technology.

This article is talking about Wifi...not wired. Wired laptops have had gig speeds, including Macs, for a while now.