Apple squishes 11 bugs while MS set to squish 12 of its own

The bug fixes kept coming Monday, as Apple shipped critical security updates for its Mac OS X operating system. The latest security update fixes several bugs in the Mac Operating system, including eight bugs in the recently released Mac OS X 10.5, known as "Leopard." Apple released the security fixes in conjunction with an 10.5.2 update to Leopard, which includes dozens of other updates.

Some of the security flaws are extremely serious, and could be exploited by hackers to run unauthorized software on a victim's computer, although Apple did not report any incidents of this occurring. The patches include fixes for Safari, Mail, Launch Services, the Mac OS Directory Services, Open Directory and Parental Controls. There are also patches for several Unix components that ship with Apple's software, including a recently patched flaw in the Samba file-and-print software.

Apple's patches come a day before Microsoft is set to issue a massive set of updates itself. Last week, the software vendor said it expected to release 12 security updates for a variety of products including critical updates for Windows, Internet Explorer and Office.

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

RIM's "critical severity outage" affects BlackBerry users

Next Story

Wearable computing becomes self-generating

22 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

It's media.. everything out there has bugs.. they just chose which one's you hear about and let you argue over it.

+1 to JimmyT

Not from here, there isn't. Absolutely NOTHING wrong with MS products, provided you half way know what you're doing!

9 patches total for most of my machines, it seems.

One "update" may include lots of smaller fixes perhaps (example: an update to MS Office might include up to 10 small bug fixes).

(kieran776 said @ #4)
One "update" may include lots of smaller fixes perhaps (example: an update to MS Office might include up to 10 small bug fixes).

At least, vista doesn't have a Vista Leon 10.1.2, Vista Leon 10.1.3, Vista Tiger 10.2.11, Vista Tiger 10.2.349, Vista Leopard 10.5.1.
Security fixes don't count as new versions of Vista. Microsoft is clear that it has security fixes, while MacOS simply says they have ... core updates? Dunno.

All OSs have exactly the same problems. Security issues. They just name it differently, or try to hide it.

(JimmyT said @ #4.1)

At least, vista doesn't have a Vista Leon 10.1.2, Vista Leon 10.1.3, Vista Tiger 10.2.11, Vista Tiger 10.2.349, Vista Leopard 10.5.1.
Security fixes don't count as new versions of Vista. Microsoft is clear that it has security fixes, while MacOS simply says they have ... core updates? Dunno.

All OSs have exactly the same problems. Security issues. They just name it differently, or try to hide it.

Leone? ,wtf is Leone!?! ..... Lion, l, l, lionheart!!

(Shiranui said @ #4.2)
Leone? ,wtf is Leone!?! ..... Lion, l, l, lionheart!!

Since there hasn't been a "Lion" MacOS, I actually used the name of one of my favorite movies. Meet Léon <- click.
All operating systems use stupid names anyway :cheeky:

(JimmyT said @ #4.1)

At least, vista doesn't have a Vista Leon 10.1.2, Vista Leon 10.1.3, Vista Tiger 10.2.11, Vista Tiger 10.2.349, Vista Leopard 10.5.1.
Security fixes don't count as new versions of Vista. Microsoft is clear that it has security fixes, while MacOS simply says they have ... core updates? Dunno.

All OSs have exactly the same problems. Security issues. They just name it differently, or try to hide it.

Those kinds of updates are not security releases. But, this horse has been beaten to death and back. For example, 10.2 and 10.5 are vastly different. I do not mean this simply by their appearances either.

The latest security update fixes several bugs in the Mac
Microsoft is set to issue a massive set of updates

how does 1 extra bug make it go from several to a massive set??

(whocares78 said @ #3)
The latest security update fixes several bugs in the Mac
Microsoft is set to issue a massive set of updates

how does 1 extra bug make it go from several to a massive set??


"Microsoft is set to issue a massive set of updates itself" suggests that both companies are providing "massive" sets. You neglected to include the word "itself" which changes the meaning of the sentence.

(Fred Derf said @ #3.1)

"Microsoft is set to issue a massive set of updates itself" suggests that both companies are providing "massive" sets. You neglected to include the word "itself" which changes the meaning of the sentence.

i am not blaming you, i noticed it was pretty much the same in the original article. and the word 'itslef' can be interpreted in different ways in this sentance..

it just seems whenever (not just in this article but whenever they come up) mac has fixes they are downplayed and when it is MS they are exagerated.. and i still dont think 12 is a massive set of updates nomater which OS

(whocares78 said @ #3.2)
and the word 'itslef' can be interpreted in different ways in this sentance..

Er, the only other way you could possibly interpret the word 'itself' in this sentence, if you were really stupid, is as stressing that this time MS was independantly issuing the set of fixes, as opposed to someother company issuing the fixes (which is, of course, virtually impossible.)

I have 1 challenge for Apple: I have Intel customized PC and I want to install yr OS on it. Comon, show us the muscles and start universalizing yr OS. Then and only then, we will see how many people will start crying OSX did not recognize my hardware.

I think this challenge is the real deal cause it would bring them on same grounds as Microsoft. Then, the real test begins between the two. Of course if Microsoft was to develop its its OS solely for its own hardware (imagine Microsoft Live Laptop lol), then you would rarely run into any problems using Windows (not that I have any problems right now)

Yeh if Apple had 90% of the desktop market they would be patching about 100 serious flaws a week. snipped vista is now rated the most secure OS in the world. :P

(Iridium said @ #1)
vista is now rated the most secure OS in the world. :P
Yeah, by Microsoft's own Security Strategy Director, Jeff Jones.

That "rating" you talk about might be better reserved for OpenBSD, which has had only two remote exploits in over 10 years. Vista has had more than that already.

(markjensen said @ #1.1)
That "rating" you talk about might be better reserved for OpenBSD, which has had only two remote exploits in over 10 years. Vista has had more than that already. ;)

Only because next to no one uses it. That's why Mac has less bugs. Because bugger all people use it, so the hackers can't be bothered making viruses for it.

(MightyJordan said @ #1.2)

Only because next to no one uses it. That's why Mac has less bugs. Because bugger all people use it, so the hackers can't be bothered making viruses for it.

Say what?

Whether an exploit exists or not is not entirely dependent on usage. Surely you are aware of this.

As far as not being used, BSD is used in a large number of web-facing servers.

(Iridium said @ #1)
Yeh if Apple had 90% of the desktop market they would be patching about 100 serious flaws a week. snipped vista is now rated the most secure OS in the world. :P


I think you are misquoting the article you are trying to quote. It said that vista was the most secure *CLOSED SOURCE* OS in the world. Two completely different things.

(deadearth said @ #1.5)


I think you are misquoting the article you are trying to quote. It said that vista was the most secure *CLOSED SOURCE* OS in the world. Two completely different things.

Nah, my Amiga hasn't ever needed a security patch yet..
;)