Apple sued over free iOS games with in-app purchases

Phoenix, Pennsylvania resident Garen Meguerian has filed a class-action lawsuit with the U.S. District Court in the Northern District of California against Apple this week on behalf of himself and other parents and/or guardians he alleges have acquired credit card charges unwittingly. The issue, in regards to the lawsuit, is with free iPhone and iPad games that have in-app purchases; he claims that these in-app purchases makes it easy for children to think they are paying for something in-game when in reality they are spending actual money.

AppleInsider is reporting that Meguerian allowed his two daughters, ages 9 and 12, to download free games from the App Store like Zombie Cafe and Treasure Story. But he had no idea that the games he let his daughters download included virtual currency that could be purchased with actual money via credit card. He says that the in-app purchases in the games his daughter downloaded cost him about $200.

Though Apple has mandated that users input their password before authorizing any in-app purchases, Meguerian argues that the password is the same as the password used for Apple purchases and minors who know it can proceed with a purchase without needing to ask their parents. He says that this has allowed Apple to "pocket millions of dollars" through games such as Bakery Story, Cake MakerSmurfs' Village, Tap Fish, and Tap Zoo, among others.

The suit seeks damages and attorney's fees for Meguerian and others that are participating in the class-action lawsuit.

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Your child orders pay-per-view, porn, etc. without your knowledge or permission because you failed to go through your cable/satellite box settings and restrict this content. Who is at fault?

If you answered anything that doesn't rhyme with "it's my own fault" you should have the child removed from your home and placed with a competent adult.

To all those that are slamming the parent....
In game purchase restrictions only cam into being with 4.3 of the IOS.
In game purchase prior to 4.3 allowed you to purchase in game items without the requirement of the password being entered.
My guess would be that a lot of the complainants will be looking for re-imbursment for issues that occurred before the IOS was updated to not permit this from happening.

The main fault was the ability of buying in game items without it prompting for a password confirmation, but just a box saying ARE YOU SURE.

As to people getting there money back I doubt that the application itself would have reimbursed them for products they feel they sold to the cst. One major fault was that apple allowed the app to allow an in game purchase without asking for a password, or it being undeniably clear it was a chargeable service. (Many games just prompted a are you sure button to confirm a real payment transaction, that differed no differently from a no real payment transaction in the app).

The way I see it....there has to be one iTunes password and one transaction password - when actual monetary transaction takes place! It would solve this thing!

Here is the situation... Parent let's kids use iPad. Kids ask to download a free game. Dad is busy doing something like building a ship in a bottle and says, "OK." kids come back moments later and say, "Dad we need a password to install it." He says, "Really? That's stupid." Dad gives password to children to install a FREE game, not even realizing that he's about to get owned by his kids. Weather or not the kids knew is the question. A password, no matter how stupid of a move it was for dad to do, was handed off to children to install a free game. Then they entered it again for items in game possibly not understanding what they were doing. 200 dollars in app charges is retarded. I get emails a few days after I make a purchase in app store, is this not the same way in-app purchase are handled? So the girls spent 200 some dollars in a week at most? Doubt it. Unless dad gVe them the password for his email too in which they were deleting to hide it. In that case, you better get a safe for moms jewelry and the coin jar.

I think the real problem here is that iTunes and the Apple App store REQUIRE you to enter a password for free content. The way I see it, the parent didn't want to be asked for his password everytime they wanted to install a free app, so he gave it to his daughters. There is no different password for paid content versus free content, nor is there an option for one.

Yes, we can say he is stupid and even a bad parent for not screening his childrens' apps, and also for giving out his password to his children. The lawsuit isn't really about that. The lawsuit indicates that there is no seperate password that would only authorize charges, and the lawsuit claims that apple knowingly supports content which is not entirely clear about real money charges versus in-game "virtual money" purchases.

So, while I would personally screen my child's apps, he does have the right to share his password with his children if he feels he can trust him, and he doesn't want to screen his childrens' apps. I don't think he is entitled to money, as he is lucky this is all that happened when giving out his password, but I do think there should be a seperate password available to give to someone for free content versus paid content. Or, better yet, give an option that you do not need a password to install free content. This is what I think.

If he feels he can trust his children with his password, it's not exactly Apple's fault if the kids abuse their privilege. If he simply gave his password because he didn't want to be asked for it repeatedly, then again it's not exactly Apple's fault if he's lazy.

Invizibleyez said,
...I do think there should be a seperate password available to give to someone for free content versus paid content. Or, better yet, give an option that you do not need a password to install free content. This is what I think.

No offence, but I think that's a stupid and unnecessarily convoluted idea. A line must be drawn, else Apple would need to cater for stupider and stupider people. Ability to disable in-app purchases and mandatory confirmation plus password when buying in-app is enough. Now you suggest having 2 passwords? Seriously? I'd rather they implement a quick IQ test before letting people purchase smartphones.

Manish said,
If he feels he can trust his children with his password, it's not exactly Apple's fault if the kids abuse their privilege. If he simply gave his password because he didn't want to be asked for it repeatedly, then again it's not exactly Apple's fault if he's lazy.


You missed the point. Why do we need a password to install free content?
No offence, but I think that's a stupid and unnecessarily convoluted idea. A line must be drawn, else Apple would need to cater for stupider and stupider people. Ability to disable in-app purchases and mandatory confirmation plus password when buying in-app is enough. Now you suggest having 2 passwords? Seriously? I'd rather they implement a quick IQ test before letting people purchase smartphones.


These idiots shouldn't be allowed to breed. He GAVE HIS CHILDREN HIS PASSWORD and then proceeded to LET THEM PLAY WITH THE PHONE. How can he have the audacity to blame Apple in any way, shape or form for this?!

This is like the woman who successfully sued mcdonalds for spilling hot coffee on herself when the cup didn't say "contents hot" -- stupidity is rife in this day and age.

OMG I lent my children my wallet, and they spent some money in it. Couldn't be my fault or theirs, sue the wallet maker and the central bank.

gb8080 said,
OMG I lent my children my wallet, and they spent some money in it. Couldn't be my fault or theirs, sue the wallet maker and the central bank.

LOL

dumb ass, he needs to look at the restrictions for in app purchases. This case is going to get thrown out. If for whatever dumb reason it don't, I will let a 3 year old play something and rack up a bill so I can sue apple for damages

another thing, if your kid knows the password to even proceed with the in app purchase, you need to rethink letting your child play with the iphone/ipod

Funny how on itunes Description
PLEASE NOTE: Zombie Cafe is free to play, but charges real money for additional in-app content. You may lock out the ability to purchase in-app content by adjusting your device's settings.

1. Maybe he should have had a look at the games himself first?
2. It's no longer possible without entering the account password and if you have given your child your password you can't really complain

I can see how in many of these cases the whole idea of the free games with in app purchases was to prey on these kinds of situations still, sue the app developer then if anyone and not apple... If your child get your creditcard and spent a load of money on Framville who would you take action against? Zynga or Facebook?

When my daughters get old enough to have their own iPods, if the device is associated with my Apple ID, then I'm going to be in control of what apps are downloaded. That includes free apps. They will have to get my permission and I'll probably only download the apps through iTunes so they have to sync to download them.

Once my daughters have their own money (summer job or whatever) and can get their own Apple ID and pay for their own apps, then they're on their own. Hopefully I'll have taught them the value of money and how the world works in that regard.

Right now my girls are too young to have their own iPods. However I do let my 4-year old use the iPod to watch cartoons on Netflix, etc. She doesn't know my Apple ID password, and she doesn't know my iPod's pin. I have in-app purchases locked down, so she wouldn't be able to do anything. I thought that was pretty obviously the way to handle the situation.

But does apple have a an option to disable in app purchasing? There is a way to limit in the iPhone but can we limit/ restrict in app purchasing?

thnok said,
But does apple have a an option to disable in app purchasing? There is a way to limit in the iPhone but can we limit/ restrict in app purchasing?

You can disable in app purchases on the iPhone as well. It is in the Restrictions section in Settings.

thnok said,
But does apple have a an option to disable in app purchasing? There is a way to limit in the iPhone but can we limit/ restrict in app purchasing?

Read the posts above yours.

roadwarrior said,

Wow, you actually expect people to READ around here before posting? You're harsh. LOL

A lot of people are in the process of making a post and while doing so, others reply. You then dont see the reply unless you refresh the page. So sometimes is not that people dont read, its that they are unaware that something was posted.

techbeck said,

A lot of people are in the process of making a post and while doing so, others reply. You then dont see the reply unless you refresh the page. So sometimes is not that people dont read, its that they are unaware that something was posted.


Which might be an excuse here if it hadn't been for the fact that the reply that described how to disable in-app purchases (Sabrex's a few posts up) was posted about two hours before Thnok's post above.

I am going to be very upfrint. For those who agree with thsi lawsuit, you are as stupid as these parents and lawyers.
If teh parents buy the kids an iDevices and they know games have in-app purchases, all they have to do is remove the credit card from the account. Wait....here is one better. Why so you sync their device with YOUR account. Creat them an account using a gift card and dont put a credit card on it. Or get them their own card and when they run out of money...too bad.

And they are claiming this kids think it is part of the game? HELLO>>>>Whose child is that dumb? If your child is that dumb, why did you buy them such a device?

Wait, isn't thsi the group of people who claim they are so smart? And yes that is a hidden message. I thought you all have the smartest kids on earth? Now you are saying they are to dumb to know the difference between spending game money and real money?

I would love to be in that court room. I would have to stand up and say you must be out of your cotton-picken mind.

When you purchase anything from inside a game, it asks for a passowrd. What idiot parent would give the password to the child in the first place? And you want to sue Apple for your won stupidity? No wonder you kids are stupid, the apple usually doesn't fall to far from the tree. No pun intended.

The nerve of these parents and the nerve of these greedy low life lawyers. The courts need to put heavy fines on people who waste the courts time with frivilous bull%#$@. This is really getting out of hand. It need sto stop.

^^^^

You need a hobby dude...way to much hostility...and name calling is against the rules here so you may want to check that at the door.

techbeck said,
^^^^

You need a hobby dude...way to much hostility...and name calling is against the rules here so you may want to check that at the door.


Not to mention calling people stupid, and the producing a poor quality post like that is highly hypocritical

TCLN Ryster said,

Not to mention calling people stupid, and the producing a poor quality post like that is highly hypocritical

Not to mention someone calling others stupid while their post is riddled with spelling errors.

Is there some kind of disclaimer when starting/installing the games that tells about in app purchases and what to do to protect against unauthorized spending? If not, then Apple is at fault.

When you click to buy an in-app purchase, it asks to confirm your action. You then have to enter your password. Prior to iOS v4.3, it wouldn't always ask for your password; this is not the case anymore and it must be entered now.

Parents have 2 methods of preventing "unauthorised" in-app purchases. One is to disable them completely (as detailed in an above post by sabrex), the second is to not give their kids their iTunes Store password.

I really don't think Apple needs to implement any further measures. This would only be catering for the minority who are absolute idiots, and making it more of a hindrance for the more "able" users.

Manish said,
When you click to buy an in-app purchase, it asks to confirm your action. You then have to enter your password. Prior to iOS v4.3, it wouldn't always ask for your password; this is not the case anymore and it must be entered now.

Parents have 2 methods of preventing "unauthorised" in-app purchases. One is to disable them completely (as detailed in an above post by sabrex), the second is to not give their kids their iTunes Store password.

I really don't think Apple needs to implement any further measures. This would only be catering for the minority who are absolute idiots, and making it more of a hindrance for the more "able" users.

Thanks for the info

techbeck said,

Thanks for the info

Just to add to this, in the App Store when browsing Apps you can clearly see ones which have In App Purchases (and I tend to avoid these ones anyway, I've only ever made one in app purchase and it was for a magazine)

Some may be a bad parent, but that does not give them the right to blame someone else for their stupidity. I def got hooked playing We Rule but I swore to myself that I would never spend my money to buy fake items in a game. Fact of the matter is these companies make waaay more money on the in game purchases then they would if they sold the game for $5.

I firmly believe many of people here blaming the parent for not know how to parent would/are just as bad as a parent. The family unit is gone and pretty much has been for sometime. He is just a little uninformed when it comes to technology. But make no mistake, many on this forum and today's generation will be/are horrible parents.

CJ33 said,
The family unit is gone and pretty much has been for sometime.

Maybe in YOUR family, or among people where you live, but certainly not in mine, or even most people that I know. The dumbass in question here gave his 9 and 12 year old children the passwords to his iTunes account, and now wants to sue Apple because those children were allowed to make in-app purchases that cost him money. Apple has measures in place to prevent in-app purchases if the user wants to do that, yet he obviously didn't take advantage of that feature. How exactly is this Apple's fault?

roadwarrior said,

Maybe in YOUR family, or among people where you live, but certainly not in mine, or even most people that I know. The dumbass in question here gave his 9 and 12 year old children the passwords to his iTunes account, and now wants to sue Apple because those children were allowed to make in-app purchases that cost him money. Apple has measures in place to prevent in-app purchases if the user wants to do that, yet he obviously didn't take advantage of that feature. How exactly is this Apple's fault?

Literally the only way Apple could have prevented this (if it was their fault) would have been by not selling paid apps..They had passed 2 levels of security to buy the content..

tmaxxtigger said,
About time. Free is free. Don't try snag people with in-App.

Nobody is snagging anybody. Devs make free apps so the user can try them out then if they want to continue then they have the chance to buy. Nobody is forcing you to buy in-app content.

You get prompted on every download with a price tag displayed clearly.

Case will be dismissed, the people involved will get their picture in the paper with their big wide smiles with no teeth and oil on their shirts.

More irresponsible parents wanting to blame others for their own stupidity. I hope the judge throws out the case and makes this idiot stand outside an Apple store with a sign saying "I'm too stupid to own an iPhone".

While I don't agree with the lawsuit, in game purchase have gotten out of hand, quite a few of the games paid and free are garbage/crippled without buying multiple in game items, sometimes it puts you well over the cost of retail pc/console games for the "full game".

if this is the new wave of DLC we can except in the future it look like gaming might truly be dead to me.

The Dark Knight said,
+1

dont' play those games... if everyone gets smarter and doesn't play those games we wouldn't have this problem. of course the developers will always allow for this as it's their only means of making money...

jeffT said,
While I don't agree with the lawsuit, in game purchase have gotten out of hand, quite a few of the games paid and free are garbage/crippled without buying multiple in game items, sometimes it puts you well over the cost of retail pc/console games for the "full game".

if this is the new wave of DLC we can except in the future it look like gaming might truly be dead to me.

Do what I do and don't download anything that's free which has one of the In App Purchases banners in the description, you know the app is going to be pretty useless before you buy anthing

To the parent: Settings -> General -> Restrictions -> (enter password) ... under Allowed Content, set In-App Purchases to OFF. If you're going to let your children play with your phone, at least know how to use it. And this password is not your iTunes password, it's one you set on the phone.

sabrex said,
To the parent: Settings -> General -> Restrictions -> (enter password) ... under Allowed Content, set In-App Purchases to OFF. If you're going to let your children play with your phone, at least know how to use it. And this password is not your iTunes password, it's one you set on the phone.

Even better solution.

chadlachlanross said,

Even better solution.


this will be apple's only defense and it's a damn good one.... they already thought of this and put in a method to prevent it if you aren't smart enough to read the manual or figure things out on your own then don't bitch to apple.

I remember being smart enough to distinguish real money $ signs from fake virtual money. so the kids aren't very bright here.

sabrex said,
To the parent: Settings -> General -> Restrictions -> (enter password) ... under Allowed Content, set In-App Purchases to OFF. If you're going to let your children play with your phone, at least know how to use it. And this password is not your iTunes password, it's one you set on the phone.

I think the only other thing that would help here would be requiring some kind of a symbol or note in the description that mentions that the app has in-app purchasing abilities. But when the service can be totally disabled, it seems pointless.

Just another American style lawsuit. I hate living in this country sometimes.

sabrex said,
To the parent: Settings -> General -> Restrictions -> (enter password) ... under Allowed Content, set In-App Purchases to OFF. If you're going to let your children play with your phone, at least know how to use it. And this password is not your iTunes password, it's one you set on the phone.

Exactly.

Tanshin said,

I think the only other thing that would help here would be requiring some kind of a symbol or note in the description that mentions that the app has in-app purchasing abilities.

When you look at the app's description in the App Store on the device, those with in-app purchases have a "Top In App Purchases" link. Similar type of thing if you visit via iTunes.

capr said,

this will be apple's only defense and it's a damn good one.... they already thought of this and put in a method to prevent it if you aren't smart enough to read the manual or figure things out on your own then don't bitch to apple.

I remember being smart enough to distinguish real money $ signs from fake virtual money. so the kids aren't very bright here.

I'm no expert at US law, but their point doesn't automatically become invalid because it's stated in the manual. You have to understand that in-app purchases in itself is a relatively new concept, and having disclaimers and manuals doesn't automatically exempt Apple from responsibility.

So the class action lawsuit itself is stupid because it's about seeking damages, that is what i hate about it, but the idea of making it harder for companies, not just Appl, to screw us over for money is a noble idea.

Personally it stinks of purposely allowing people to mistakenly make purchases they didn't want, nomatter what options they have available. In-App Purchases should rather be opt-in, than opt-out.

Though as i said, i definitely don't support class action lawsuits that seeks damages that simply aren't there, but i think the point that in-app purchases are too easy to let happen unnoticed is real enough, that includes Google, and other companies as well.

FISKER_Q said,

I'm no expert at US law, but their point doesn't automatically become invalid because it's stated in the manual. You have to understand that in-app purchases in itself is a relatively new concept, and having disclaimers and manuals doesn't automatically exempt Apple from responsibility.

So the class action lawsuit itself is stupid because it's about seeking damages, that is what i hate about it, but the idea of making it harder for companies, not just Appl, to screw us over for money is a noble idea.

Personally it stinks of purposely allowing people to mistakenly make purchases they didn't want, nomatter what options they have available. In-App Purchases should rather be opt-in, than opt-out.

Though as i said, i definitely don't support class action lawsuits that seeks damages that simply aren't there, but i think the point that in-app purchases are too easy to let happen unnoticed is real enough, that includes Google, and other companies as well.

I don't understand how you can mistakenly make purchases. In the store you have to click the button twice, AND put in your password. In app I'm guessing is the same, you definitely have to put in a password. If you tell your children your password, it's your own damn fault when your kids download ****. What kind of moron would try to blame that on someone else?

There's no such thing as accidental downloading. There is just people being too dumb to use technology.

sabrex said,
To the parent: Settings -> General -> Restrictions -> (enter password) ... under Allowed Content, set In-App Purchases to OFF. If you're going to let your children play with your phone, at least know how to use it. And this password is not your iTunes password, it's one you set on the phone.

Ah, I don't have an iPhone and didn't know of this setting. Good. Hopefully that will get it thrown out of court.

AJerman said,

I don't understand how you can mistakenly make purchases. In the store you have to click the button twice, AND put in your password. In app I'm guessing is the same, you definitely have to put in a password. If you tell your children your password, it's your own damn fault when your kids download ****. What kind of moron would try to blame that on someone else?

There's no such thing as accidental downloading. There is just people being too dumb to use technology.

+1

FISKER_Q said,

I'm no expert at US law, but their point doesn't automatically become invalid because it's stated in the manual. You have to understand that in-app purchases in itself is a relatively new concept, and having disclaimers and manuals doesn't automatically exempt Apple from responsibility.

And the fact that a Iphone does not contain any manual at all.
As far as i can remember, it contain some some offer, a warranty and some useless stuff.

AJerman said,

I don't understand how you can mistakenly make purchases. In the store you have to click the button twice, AND put in your password. In app I'm guessing is the same, you definitely have to put in a password. If you tell your children your password, it's your own damn fault when your kids download ****. What kind of moron would try to blame that on someone else?

There's no such thing as accidental downloading. There is just people being too dumb to use technology.

Yeah except that the password didn't get added until a few weeks ago (Due to the public pressure being too high), also not all people would nessecarily use their own account for a family member, but maybe help him or her set it up.

But unless the companies are malicious in their intent, then making the system more secure from the start has no affect on sales, so it shouldn't really be an issue to begin with.

Magallanes said,

And the fact that a Iphone does not contain any manual at all.
As far as i can remember, it contain some some offer, a warranty and some useless stuff.

The iPhone User Manual is a bookmark in Safari on every clean install of iOS. It's actually very full featured for the non-tech savvy and uses some very swanky HTML to make it feel like a native app..

chadlachlanross said,
So don't tell them your Apple ID password. Problem solved.

Exactly. What an idiot. "I had no way of knowing it was REAL money..."

chadlachlanross said,
So don't tell them your Apple ID password. Problem solved.

+1 You should never tell anyone your password, including your children for this exact reason.

I agree with it though, just make apps paid or not paid. In-app purchases are annoying. Plus they should ask for the password. Hopefully they win.

TechDudeGeorge said,
I agree with it though, just make apps paid or not paid. In-app purchases are annoying. Plus they should ask for the password. Hopefully they win.

They do have a password.

Fred Derf said,

In-App purchases only prompt for the password if the App store hasn't been accessed recently.

Didn't one of the recent updates change that to always ask for the password now?

Manish said,

Didn't one of the recent updates change that to always ask for the password now?

I've always been prompted... regardless of how soon after my last purchase... its kinda annoying lol

TechDudeGeorge said,
I agree with it though, just make apps paid or not paid. In-app purchases are annoying. Plus they should ask for the password. Hopefully they win.

Yeah it's very annoying getting a free app, but when you open it, you discover it's worthless cuz you you have to pay for most or all the content inside the app.

That's the reason we have the lite, free, demo versions, if you like the app, just get the full version with all the good stuff!

AdmiralRooster said,

I've always been prompted... regardless of how soon after my last purchase... its kinda annoying lol

I just looked it up. Since v4.3, it always asks for your password before any in-app purchases. This wasn't the case before. So as Jan said - "They do have a password."

I forgot to reply to this part of the original comment - "In-app purchases are annoying." What's actually annoying (in my opinion, anyway) is developers misusing/abusing the in-app purchases feature. When used appropriately, they are indeed useful. For example, the TomTom apps use in-app purchasing to allow users to buy traffic info for a certain time period. Also, without in-app purchases, there would be a lot of "repeated" apps on the App Store, which would also be annoying.

Manish said,

I just looked it up. Since v4.3, it always asks for your password before any in-app purchases. This wasn't the case before. So as Jan said - "They do have a password."

I forgot to reply to this part of the original comment - "In-app purchases are annoying." What's actually annoying (in my opinion, anyway) is developers misusing/abusing the in-app purchases feature. When used appropriately, they are indeed useful. For example, the TomTom apps use in-app purchasing to allow users to buy traffic info for a certain time period. Also, without in-app purchases, there would be a lot of "repeated" apps on the App Store, which would also be annoying.

Yes, but as you said it's abused. Many free apps look appealing in the app store, you download them. Then most games are like to continue, buy this. Or buy these coins in something or another. It's better just playing the Demo and to continue buying the full version.

In-app purchases should really only be used for apps like Camera/sat-nav apps to add features. Not Games.

TechDudeGeorge said,
I agree with it though, just make apps paid or not paid. In-app purchases are annoying. Plus they should ask for the password. Hopefully they win.

speaking of stuff thats got fake money that requires real money to pay.. Foopets is switching to $5 a month April 26. I imagine I might file a complaint with BBB for that. Built up 150,000 foogems and $6 foodollars. Can't imagine what would happen if Facebook required someone to pay $5 to join.

max_ireland said,
If you're dumb enough to let your children play with technology unsupervised, you should pay the bill!

Children are smart and observant - I agree with the lawsuit.

SpyCatcher said,

Children are smart and observant - I agree with the lawsuit.


Being smart and observant doesn't magically grant the kids the password to their parent's iTunes accounts with stored credit card details. The parents were responsible for that. - I disagree with the lawsuit and in fact wish the parents in question lost more money. Typical Americans... absolutely zero personal responsibility, it's always someone else's fault... quick! who can I sue?

SpyCatcher said,

Children are smart and observant - I agree with the lawsuit.

Adults generally tend to be more intelligent than children. It isn't Apple's fault that this man was outwitted by a child.

TCLN Ryster said,

Being smart and observant doesn't magically grant the kids the password to their parent's iTunes accounts with stored credit card details. The parents were responsible for that. - I disagree with the lawsuit and in fact wish the parents in question lost more money. Typical Americans... absolutely zero personal responsibility, it's always someone else's fault... quick! who can I sue?

When you look at the business model it is designed to trick people into beleiving what they are buying is virtual money.

TCLN Ryster said,
Typical Americans... absolutely zero personal responsibility, it's always someone else's fault... quick! who can I sue?
Oh can I do this too? Typical Europeans that think they are perfect and full of themselves.

max_ireland said,
If you're dumb enough to let your children play with technology unsupervised, you should pay the bill!

Exactly. What a fool. And if he didn't want his kids to make purchases on his phone, what do they need the iTunes password for?? I wish he'd lost more money honestly.

necrosis said,
Oh can I do this too? Typical Europeans that think they are perfect and full of themselves.

Yeah, the derogatory posts by "Perfect Europeans" are getting old on here. Perhaps they should reflect on some of their own problems, which are many...

TCLN Ryster said,

Being smart and observant doesn't magically grant the kids the password to their parent's iTunes accounts with stored credit card details. The parents were responsible for that. - I disagree with the lawsuit and in fact wish the parents in question lost more money. Typical Americans... absolutely zero personal responsibility, it's always someone else's fault... quick! who can I sue?
I agree that there is a bit of parenting issues going on here, but it's incredibly easy to skim the password from people typing on a digit pad, especially considering if you watch it enough times, the characters literally appear before "starring" out.

pickypg said,
I agree that there is a bit of parenting issues going on here, but it's incredibly easy to skim the password from people typing on a digit pad, especially considering if you watch it enough times, the characters literally appear before "starring" out.

So in other words his kids are on their way to becoming professional crooks? LOL

max_ireland said,
If you're dumb enough to let your children play with technology unsupervised, you should pay the bill!

Everyone is missing the fact there's parental controls built in to iOS, and you can turn off in app purchases, installing apps, or do it by the rating etc.

It's a moot point because if they know the itunes password and have install app privileges they could tack up $200 dollars worth of charges by installing a load of paid games - it's the same thing.

max_ireland said,
If you're dumb enough to let your children play with technology unsupervised, you should pay the bill!
The bottom line though is that the parents didn't authorise the purchases, and Apple is complicit in the fraudulent activity by making it easy and allowing children to charge someone else's card without authority.

TCLN Ryster said,

Being smart and observant doesn't magically grant the kids the password to their parent's iTunes accounts with stored credit card details. The parents were responsible for that. - I disagree with the lawsuit and in fact wish the parents in question lost more money. Typical Americans... absolutely zero personal responsibility, it's always someone else's fault... quick! who can I sue?

It's quite hard to make an iTunes account, without a credit card. That's Apple's fault, I approve of this lawsuit.

M_Lyons10 said,

Yeah, the derogatory posts by "Perfect Europeans" are getting old on here. Perhaps they should reflect on some of their own problems, which are many...

It all comes down to jealousy.

SpyCatcher said,

Children are smart and observant - I agree with the lawsuit.

certainly smarter than anyone on this board. Thats how it always is. I'm sure I'm not the only one that remembers life without the internet. These kids grew up with internet always around. Oh to learn how to type on an electric typewriter. I actually cheated most of the time. But because of the internet and aol not a year out of high school. 80 wpm is rather slow for me. I'm the only one in the house that knows how to type. not hunt and peck. now um trying to hit a touch pad keyboard. No. hate it. bit pointless to have a QWERTY keyboard if there's no buttons

dvb2000 said,
The bottom line though is that the parents didn't authorise the purchases, and Apple is complicit in the fraudulent activity by making it easy and allowing children to charge someone else's card without authority.

LOLno.

As some else has already pointed out, they could use the same password to download paid app's. iOS has plenty of parental options at any parents disposal, Not Apple's fault he didn't activate them.

SpyCatcher said,

When you look at the business model it is designed to trick people into beleiving what they are buying is virtual money.

Thanks, I needed a good laugh this morning.

SpyCatcher said,

Children are smart and observant - I agree with the lawsuit.


I agree as well. I think it's about a time to stop an uncovered robbery from such games, which cost nothing to produce and then making over 1000000% profit mainly thank to psychological things. It's like drugs. Should be banned. Or at least they should drop prices by 1000-10000 times.