Apple Unveils Redesigned Logic Pro X with iPad Remote

In a move the music community have been anticipating for some time, Apple today announced the belated release of Logic Pro X, a comprehensive update to their music production software, following on from its last major release in 2009. The update comes with a redesigned, cleaner and streamlined interface in addition to a series of new features and tools including compatibility with Logic Remote, a new iPad app for mixing music when out of reach of a computer.

Logic Pro X and Logic Remote Accompaniment - Source: Apple

Logic Pro X and Logic Remote Accompaniment 

The new design is highly reminiscent of past versions, with rich graphics alongside controls which are instantly recognisable, yet rearranged with new colours and textures. Apple have moved away from the washed out, grey design of past versions, bringing the software closer inline with its video counterpart, Final Cut Pro X. Ease of use has been a massive focus for Apple, who have included larger elements in a new layout to ease workflow. Like previous versions, however, the software is still deep and powerful, with an abundance of contextual menus to dig into complex functions.

In today's press release, Apple pointed out tools which include FlexPitch, allowing users to alter the pitch of audio, and Drummer, which plays along to a song automatically in a variety of styles. TrackStacks is a new organisation tool for collapsing tracks into each other to save space and declutter a project, and Smart Controls allow parameters to be tweaked with little need for skill. Existing instruments have also been improved with more customisability and settings.

The aforementioned iPad app, Logic Remote, is reminiscent of the existing Garageband iPad app, but seems to be more powerful, and may be useful for solo musicians who can't access a computer or controls when recording - they can now adjust dials, sliders, and sounds from their tablet. A third app, MainStage 3, is an additional app which was also updated and redesigned today. This app is a live performance controller designed for stage events.

Phil Schiller, Apple's SVP of Worldwide Marketing commented:

Logic Pro X is our most powerful version yet, with advanced tools and a modern new interface designed to streamline the process of creating professional quality music. Musicians are going to love creative new features like Drummer, Flex Pitch, Track Stacks and the Arpeggiator.

Logic Pro X is available on the Mac App Store for the same price as it's predecessor: $199.99 in the US. MainStage 3 remains at $29.99, and Logic Remote is free.

Source: Business Insider | Image: Apple

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Logic has been overtaken in ease of use and general quality many moons ago and it's main appeal is really that it comes with a bundle of usable plugins.

This version basically tries to catch up with the rest as is the case with most things Apple nowadays. There is nothing really new or ground breaking there unless you have been living under a rock for the past few years and are a firm believer that it ain't possible until it's in Logic.

As a bundle it is an OK product, but there is much , MUCH better out there for those who actually make their living off of a DAW (and so make the money to invest in real high quality plugins). The much better also runs on much less expensive hardware which will be at least as powerful at half the price.

paulheu said,
Logic has been overtaken in ease of use and general quality many moons ago and it's main appeal is really that it comes with a bundle of usable plugins.

This version basically tries to catch up with the rest as is the case with most things Apple nowadays. There is nothing really new or ground breaking there unless you have been living under a rock for the past few years and are a firm believer that it ain't possible until it's in Logic.

As a bundle it is an OK product, but there is much , MUCH better out there for those who actually make their living off of a DAW (and so make the money to invest in real high quality plugins). The much better also runs on much less expensive hardware which will be at least as powerful at half the price.

I get the feeling that like Final Cut Pro X their main focus isn't on the large traditional 'enterprise' artist customer but what appears to be the small workshop or the enthusiast where Logic X would be more than sufficient. End of the day there is more than enough room for everyone to play in the market and focus their products to a given niche.

Apple Unveils Redesigned Logic Pro X with iPad Remote or "How to make you spend 2000$ on something you could just do with a 1000$ touch-enabled ultrabook"

Many musicians have desktop computers on a sound desk. If they are on the other side of a room, and want to change something, they would have to stand up, walk to it, and move their sliders. The iPad app solves this. It's free, many Mac users also own iPads, and it's useful, in my opinion.

(I don't know where you got $2000 from. iPad starts at $329, most expensive is $929, and Logic is $199 - All competitive)

Rafyelzz said,
I guess you-re forgetting about the Macbook? The iPad is just a remote, ffs.

Then they would have to deal with Windows - as I've said with the hardware situation out in the Windows world; great hardware ruined by a crappy operating system and fanboys unable to accept that reality in the same way that Apple fanboys couldn't accept that the G4 was becoming a joke by the time the Pentium M made an appearance.

As for the $2000 quip, where is that pricing (assuming you're talking US$)?

http://store.apple.com/us/mac/family/macbook-pro

With the entry level sitting at $1199 and the $2000 only being applicable if you go for their high end option. It seems that you're constructing strawman arguments.

I'm looking forward to trying out the ipad remote, this is a great idea bringing some of the interface to another display.

However, it only supports 64-bit plugins and the full interface hasn't been updated, ie.. the older plugins have been left alone which is a shame since there is so much better on the market at the minute and once up on a time the built in Logic stuff was awesome.

Cause you cant do this on a windows system with a windows tablet? or any tablet that supports the RDP protocol for that matter?

Cause you can. Program does not even need to support it.

Point being MS screwed over productive professionals and power users with Win 8 while Apple has left the desktop UI alone and continues to write software for said pros.

Only transport and a part of mixer is on the iPad, bulk part (arranger etc.) stays on the main screen. It'd be less limiting, sure, but largely unnecessary to have a copy of the whole screen.
This isn't however anything to do with MS. I don't think any DAW or editing suite has even partly embraced tablet as a helpful accessory yet. Therefore, praise for Apple, I think, is justified this time.
There is, however, TouchDAW (for Android) which presents rather flat, instead of this skudomorphic UI, but with the same features and already works with many other DAWs (including Logic, as it happens). Who knows which came first, we don't want patent flinging war to start, do we?

startscreennope said,
Point being MS screwed over productive professionals and power users with Win 8 while Apple has left the desktop UI alone and continues to write software for said pros.

Completely untrue. MS added functionality to the desktop in Win 8, as well as adding better multitasking support for multiple monitors. Apples multi-monitor support is nowhere near as good. MS also continues to make desktop software. Everything you've said is BS.

startscreennope said,
Wow! Apple still cares about their productivity oriented, multitasking desktop professionals. MS should take notes.

Didn't Timmy keep on saying its a post PC era? How come they still sell their inferior MAC and still care to update. It's a PC+ era my friend.

NoClipMode said,

Completely untrue. MS added functionality to the desktop in Win 8, as well as adding better multitasking support for multiple monitors. Apples multi-monitor support is nowhere near as good. MS also continues to make desktop software. Everything you've said is BS.

You are either lying or misinformed. MS is playing catchup on 4k monitor and etc. support. MS REMOVED functionality by replacing the start menu with the start screen.

So which are you, a shill, or simply didn't understand that you are completely wrong and ignorant?

The start menu is more efficient (takes less or the same # of steps to do things), contains more features for accessing, organizing and managing shortcuts, has more shortcuts for accessing other parts of your computer such as network, devices, control panel, shutdown/restart, etc., better search, nested folder support, true context menu functionality, and doesn't break workflow by covering up the entire screen when you want to launch something.

Win 7 also has Advanced Appearance Settings, Aero, better "open with" dialogue and other dialogue boxes that have reduced functionality in Win 8, no forced edge shortcuts like the charms bar, boot to desktop, the more intuitive start button, etc. Some of these are being addressed in 8.1 but not all.

All management of shortcuts can be done within the start menu itself. With the start screen you need to open the actual folder in explorer (which is still ironically called the Start Menu folder in Win 8) even just to rename a shortcut or access shortcut properties.

Fullscreen apps are the antithesis to desktop window multitasking. Docking isn't a suitable replacement. Metro apps are basically useless to anyone who wants to use their PC for multitasking, work, or desktop applications.

The claim that the start screen is functionally the same as the start menu is false, in fact it's less functional and efficient at doing its job as a shortcut organizer and launcher.

MS never screwed over power users with Windows 8. They have lost power users due to them relying on third party developers to make programs. In some cases it's saved them money but in others Apple has taken advantage. If Microsoft made a proper video editor and audio production program some media power users would come flooding back.

Edited by Gaffney, Jul 16 2013, 6:55pm :

startscreennope said,
Point being MS screwed over productive professionals and power users with Win 8 while Apple has left the desktop UI alone and continues to write software for said pros.

Didn't Linux and Windows "pros" used to poke fun at Mac OS users?

Saying that all they did was take photos and edit them, etc?

startscreennope said,
You are either lying or misinformed. MS is playing catchup on 4k monitor and etc. support. MS REMOVED functionality by replacing the start menu with the start screen.

Wut? Its upto Nvidia and AMD to provide graphic cards with 4k resolutions and up to others like asus, HP, Lenovo etc to provide monitors that can do 4k resolutions. The OS itself already supports it. Windows supported HD resolutions before you ever saw a computer with one. In 800x600 days Windows already went up to and over 1080p resolutions.
And what functionality is removed from start menu to start screen? Cause that's nothing. More got added. Its just the structure that has changed

So which are you, a shill, or simply didn't understand that you are completely wrong and ignorant?

The start menu is more efficient (takes less or the same # of steps to do things), contains more features for accessing, organizing and managing shortcuts, has more shortcuts for accessing other parts of your computer such as network, devices, control panel, shutdown/restart, etc., better search, nested folder support, true context menu functionality, and doesn't break workflow by covering up the entire screen when you want to launch something.


Start screen supports folder support, just enter C:\ or any other path you'd like to browse through. If you like giant cluttered menu structures, it is still available.
Windows 7s context menu system is still there, just a 'new' approach in start screen/modern.
Win7 has more shortcuts for accessing stuff like network drives and all? Really? Cause I have still the same possibilities as in Win7. And even more as I can directly and properly access them from the start screen. Much better then accessing huge network drives with a 10item list.
Also there is still the desktop background to launch from, the customizeable winkey+x (not available on Win7) and from the taskbar. If you have such giant issues with launching from the start screen, there's plenty of build in alternatives. You can even add a manual folder toolbar and have a basic launch menu. This is all out of the box, let alone the hundreds of third party tools available to customize your app-launching experience.

Win 7 also has Advanced Appearance Settings, Aero, better "open with" dialogue and other dialogue boxes that have reduced functionality in Win 8, no forced edge shortcuts like the charms bar, boot to desktop, the more intuitive start button, etc. Some of these are being addressed in 8.1 but not all.

Better open with dialogue? You clearly haven't used Windows 8 then. Cause its pretty much identical except the Win8 version looks more clean and basic. But the functionality from Win7 is still completely there.
Charms bar can easily be disabled by adding a registry entry. If its so trouble some, google the .reg file and run it.

All management of shortcuts can be done within the start menu itself. With the start screen you need to open the actual folder in explorer (which is still ironically called the Start Menu folder in Win 8) even just to rename a shortcut or access shortcut properties.

You can browse folders identically to Windows 7 by just typing the path. Or running gpmc.msc and pressing enter. Don't get what the issue here is?

Fullscreen apps are the antithesis to desktop window multitasking. Docking isn't a suitable replacement. Metro apps are basically useless to anyone who wants to use their PC for multitasking, work, or desktop applications.

The solution for this is very simple, don't use it. You aren't forced to use the modern apps. Or is a MS employee holding a gun to your head forcing you to download and run RT apps?

The claim that the start screen is functionally the same as the start menu is false, in fact it's less functional and efficient at doing its job as a shortcut organizer and launcher.

As written above, you clearly never really used Windows 8.
The start screen has not lost any functionality the start menu had. The bar to type in is in the top right corner instead of bottom left.

startscreennope said,
Point being MS screwed over productive professionals and power users with Win 8 while Apple has left the desktop UI alone and continues to write software for said pros.

Agreed - but it is even worse as a developer where you're saddled with two different environments that can't share settings between the two resulting in this mess where something you've setup in Windows Media Player isn't inherited by the Metro version or vice versa. The structure of Windows is even a bigger mess where if you change something lower down then all hell breaks lose some where else in the system - it is like walking through a mine field with an out of date map as a guide.

NoClipMode said,
Completely untrue. MS added functionality to the desktop in Win 8, as well as adding better multitasking support for multiple monitors. Apples multi-monitor support is nowhere near as good. MS also continues to make desktop software. Everything you've said is BS.

They're still dependent on win32 - all the focus in terms of developer improvements have been in WinRT and win32 more or less neglected; if you as a developer want an improved environment the only option you have is WinRT/ModernUI.

Gaffney said,
MS never screwed over power users with Windows 8. They have lost power users due to them relying on third party developers to make programs. In some cases it's saved them money but in others Apple has taken advantage. If Microsoft made a proper video editor and audio production program some media power users would come flooding back.

Or how about this idea; fix the desktop and leave the desktop alone - not everything needs to be 'touch based' no matter how much hardware vendors long for a reason to spur on sales.

sn0wbl1tz said,
Didn't Timmy keep on saying its a post PC era? How come they still sell their inferior MAC and still care to update. It's a PC+ era my friend.

Actually no one said it was a 'Post PC era' except those who refuse to watch the full video; it is the era of the cloud and the PC is but one device among many that is interacting with it. Rather than it being the PC at the centre of ones life you have the cloud instead and all devices synchronising through it. The PC hasn't died except in the minds of those who take quotations out of context.

The problem is that the issues you raise are only addressing the superficial layer that end users see where as what needs to be tackled is the underlying foundation that cause many of these problems; they need to replace win32, they need to lay down a HIG that all divisions in Microsoft conform to and they also need to realise that a decline in traditional PC sales doesn't point to the PC disappearing thus to burn the bridges relating to the traditional desktop paradigm is just plain stupid.