Are Intel Core 2 Chips a Security Threat?

Intel's Core 2 CPUs shipped through April contain an unprecedented number of potentially serious security flaws, and the chip giant isn't releasing enough information to allow developers to assess or work around them, according to OpenBSD founder Theo de Raadt. De Raadt issued a blistering missive Wednesday on an OpenBSD listserv, writing: "These processors are buggy as hell, and some of these bugs don't just cause development/debugging problems, but will *ASSUREDLY* be exploitable from userland code."

"I don't think Intel has made a correct assessment of the impact that some of these flaws can have," he told CRN. "I think that some of them have really severe potential security impacts." De Raadt based his comments on both an "errata list" Intel published in May and results from his own testing of the OpenBSD operating system on Core 2 chips. He said that most of the errors were most likely to cause system crashes, but that some might be exploited to create sophisticated attacks. He did not claim to be aware of any specific attacks that rely on these flaws

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News source: CRN

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cpus should be flawless! they should think for us and make the right decisions no matter what erroneous data is thrown at them! open the pod bay doors already!!!! :nuts:

I am from Intel, and I thought I would give you our perspective. Months ago, we addressed a processor issue by providing a BIOS update for our customers that in no way affects system performance. We publicly documented this as an erratum in April. All processors from all companies have errata, and Intel has a well-known errata communication process to inform our customers and the public. Keep in mind the probability of encountering this issue is extremely low. Specification Updates for the affected processors are available at http://developer.intel.com. All errata are thoroughly investigated for issues and vulnerabilities, should they have any we fix them, usually through a microcode update. We feel we’ve resolved the issue and were open about it with customers and then publicly publishing it, but this is a good venue for ideas on how we could do better or more. I am interested in any constructive comments...

now hold on there... this story makes it sound like its just Intel... if you do some research he also rips AMD! he was also ripping on AMD for its massivly buggy processors also... this article definatly put the spin on it like they wernt or were helping out more... but in reality if you read some of his other statements (google it) you see its just as bad

Secuirty impacts from the CPU?

As far as im concerned the CPU is there to execute valid instructions as its given them, not to go checking every bit of code that passes though it to see if it produces a desirable result or not.

Security is more down to the software developers to write good code than down to the physical hardware of a pc In my opinion.

dragon2611 said,
Secuirty impacts from the CPU?

As far as im concerned the CPU is there to execute valid instructions as its given them, not to go checking every bit of code that passes though it to see if it produces a desirable result or not.

Security is more down to the software developers to write good code than down to the physical hardware of a pc In my opinion.

The actual problems really have nothing to do with security, there is instructions what when executed in certain ways return the wrong result... thats what he means by buys in the processor... they are not talking about putting security checks in the proc but fixing the processors processing bugs

Some security checks are done by the CPU in protected- and long-mode.
A piece of software, refered to as a Task in the manuals, isn't allowed to do everything or execute any instruction.

Intel's manuals are perfectly clear on this. They are free for you to download (PDF) and read.
Download their manuals and have a look.

Intel 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer’s Manual Volume 1 - Basic Architecture
Intel 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer’s Manual Volume 2A - Instruction Set Reference A-M
Intel 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer’s Manual Volume 2B - Instruction Set Reference N-Z
Intel 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer’s Manual Volume 3A - System Programming Guide Part 1
Intel 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer’s Manual Volume 3B - System Programming Guide Part 2

Start with volume 1 if you want to know what it's all about. It even explains logical bits, binary numbers and "endianess".
Then there are various other manuals, such as documentation changes, information on TLBs, optimization etc.