Asus announces its first Windows RT device

While it may seem odd, no company had announced an official Windows RT (the ARM version of Windows 8) product as of yesterday. Today that changed, however, when Asus became the first company to announce a Windows RT-powered device at the Computex trade show in Taipei.

The company announced the Tablet 600, a device in the company's "transformer" range that can change from tablet to laptop by featuring a detachable keyboard. The device features a quad-core Tegra 3 processor, 32GB of storage, 2GB of RAM and a 10.1-inch screen featuring a 1366x768 resolution. According to Infoworld, the hybrid device weighs 1.15 pounds and is just .33 inches thick. 

As with all Windows RT devices, the Tablet 600 will come with Microsoft Office 15 pre-installed. The device will also feature an 8-megapixel rear-facing camera with LED flash, a front-facing 2-megapixel camera and Bluetooth 4.0. More typical features include WiFi, a gyroscope and similar sensors, GPS and NFC. The device comes bundled with its aforementioned detachable keyboard. In addition to a trackpad and full keyboard, the detachable unit features additional USB ports and an integrated second battery.

A release date and pricing information has yet to be determined. A likely time frame is late this year, given Windows 8 and Windows RT are expected to officially launch in October.

Sources: EngadgetThe Verge, Infoworld | Image via Engadget

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Quad core for a 32gb ARM tablet/netbook for internet, mail and casual gaming? You can't do any serious work with it, why would you need a quad core? Now it looks more obvious how pointless that trend is.

thartist said,
Quad core for a 32gb ARM tablet/netbook for internet, mail and casual gaming? You can't do any serious work with it, why would you need a quad core? Now it looks more obvious how pointless that trend is.

Really? Running Word, Excel, or a full ported version of Photoshop isn't doing any real work?

What is real work then? AutoCAD and engineering software? Cause there is already 3D design and modeling software in development for WinRT that runs on Windows RT too.

This is NOT a PHONE OS...

I hope to see a lot more of this design, love the idea of detachable screens. Would really like to see a high end laptop with this.

BajiRav said,
uh...I hope OEMs don't stick to minimum resolution requirements like this one Need moar pixels!

wasn't there a previous acer story with an 11" 1920x1080 tablet?

BajiRav said,
uh...I hope OEMs don't stick to minimum resolution requirements like this one Need moar pixels!

Considering there have been several announcements already that go from minimum to beyond iPad, this won't be a problem

Additionally, Microsoft wants MFRs to shoot for 291ppi at 10", which is beyond the 264ppi of the new iPad.

Another thing of note, as technology advances, and tablet/desktop displays move to true 36bit and higher color, Windows tablets are already capable of supporting these jumps in color fidelity. (Windows 7 already supports these color capabilities.)

So considering we NOW talking about display technologies standardizing around almost 300ppi (dpi), which was once considered good for black and white laser printers and is getting to pixels that are smaller than what most people can see without a magnifying glass.


FalseAgent said,
Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you the reason why Windows 8 won't be another Vista.

Ehh on the hybrid side sure it won't be but on the desktop side it will fail since mouse and keyboard just doesn't work properly with the Metro applications.

FalseAgent said,
Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you the reason why Windows 8 won't be another Vista.

Even that statement is wrong as Microsioft sold about 380 million Vista licenses, used the core architecture changes as the basis of Windows 7 and most importantly of all, they made a ton if money.

Compare it to Windows ME or the HP TouchPad. Those products actually flopped in record time.

Chica Ami said,

Ehh on the hybrid side sure it won't be but on the desktop side it will fail since mouse and keyboard just doesn't work properly with the Metro applications.


Exactly why Windows 8 isn't another Vista!

Chica Ami said,

mouse and keyboard just doesn't work properly with the Metro applications.

You know what also doesn't work properly with Metro applications? Windows 7. Oh no! Windows 7 is going to fail!

Really? Just don't use the metro applications. The Windows 8 start screen is very well optimized for mouse and keyboard. If you don't like metro apps, don't use them. There are desktop alternatives.

simplezz said,
I thought WinRT was supposed to be streamlined? Why does it need 2GB of ram then?

Why not? Better than being caught short because they went cheap on the memory, especially since it's fairly cheap to begin with. Rather have 2GB than 512MB (or worse) like some junk tablets that are out there.

simplezz said,
I thought WinRT was supposed to be streamlined? Why does it need 2GB of ram then?

Streamlined means the OS can run on less, doesn't mean you as a user don't want more.

simplezz said,
I thought WinRT was supposed to be streamlined? Why does it need 2GB of ram then?

RAM is also cheap as sh**, the more the merrier imo.

simplezz said,
I thought WinRT was supposed to be streamlined? Why does it need 2GB of ram then?

You guys want phones with 1GB of ram but a tablet with 2GB is too much? Wha?

Minimoose said,

RAM is also cheap as sh**, the more the merrier imo.


Yeah, except Microsoft themselves told us recently that memory kills battery life and the art is to optimize software to the point where it requires as little as possible.

GP007 said,

You guys want phones with 1GB of ram but a tablet with 2GB is too much? Wha?


Android tablets have 1GB and lower. My Novo 7 Elf ICS tablet has 1GB and it's never been a problem.

.Neo said,

Yeah, except Microsoft themselves told us recently that memory kills battery life and the art is to optimize software to the point where it requires as little as possible.

Can you quote this, because RAM is RAM is RAM and it is being refreshed the same whether there is data stored in it or not.

simplezz said,

Android tablets have 1GB and lower. My Novo 7 Elf ICS tablet has 1GB and it's never been a problem.

And Windows 7 runs smoother on 512mb of RAM than Android, what is the comparative point here?

Microsoft setting a bar for 'tablet' class devices at 2GB is not a big request. Does Windows RT technically NEED 2GB of RAM. NO.

Here...
http://blogs.msdn.com/b/b8/arc...processor-architecture.aspx

Scroll down, notice that there are photos of a pre-Windows 8 version of Windows RT (still called Windows 7 in the screenshots) running on a WP7 device with 256mb of RAM. (It is a pre-release WP7 class device as well, which is why it didn't have the agreed 512mb requirement WP7 had at launch.)

This is FULL Windows 7-8 NT running on a 1ghz ARM phone with 256mb of RAM.

Even the early Android devices pre 2.3 on 256mb devices are a nightmare to use, and Microsoft has been running freaking NT (the OS code base and features running servers, desktops) on a freaking ARM smartphone.

Microsoft is pushing OEMs to 2gb for user experience, not because the OS needs it to function.


This is FULL Windows NT, not a scaled down phone OS version.

Like the design, especially having a detachable keyboard. Curious how expensive it's going to be.. still debating going with one of these or a bigger but more flexible x86 based mobile system.

I'm so going to make the metro 'dropped' app. It plays 'Arrghhhhhhhhhhhhhhh' when it detects the laptop is droping.

sagum said,
I'm so going to make the metro 'dropped' app. It plays 'Arrghhhhhhhhhhhhhhh' when it detects the laptop is droping.

I doubt the APIs support that kind of background multitasking, plus your app would probably need to become the active app to play the noise which may require user consent first.

sagum said,
I'm so going to make the metro 'dropped' app. It plays 'Arrghhhhhhhhhhhhhhh' when it detects the laptop is droping.

...or when you throw it against the wall from getting fed up with metro

sagum said,
I'm so going to make the metro 'dropped' app. It plays 'Arrghhhhhhhhhhhhhhh' when it detects the laptop is droping.

Shoot it has two cameras too.. could always do a motion sensing Aperture Science Sentry Turret app too. Could be cute.

thealexweb said,

I doubt the APIs support that kind of background multitasking, plus your app would probably need to become the active app to play the noise which may require user consent first.

Um, Windows RT is Windows 8 NT on ARM. This is NOT a subset OS, nor another OS that 'looks' like Windows NT.

People that are treating this like a dumbed down OS version like iOS or Android have really been misinformed by the tech press.

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/b8/arc...processor-architecture.aspx

Anyone that was alive in the 90s surely remembers NT 4.0 on PPC, Alpha, and other architectures.


Flipping IDIOTS like Paul Thurrott cannot seem to understand this simple aspect either, so it isn't surprising that most press coverage of Windows RT is highly mis-informative.


thenetavenger said,

First of all, that poster was talking about the limitations of the WinRT API. What he said applies to Metro apps on both x86 and ARM.
Second of all, there is one big difference between Windows RT and the old PPC, Alpha, etc. versions. Windows RT doesn't allow any third-party applications outside Windows Store.

From the blog post you linked to: "In fact, WOA only supports running code that has been distributed through Windows Update along with the full spectrum of Windows Store applications."

That means WinRT is the only API that can be used for third-party apps on Windows RT. That means third-party apps can't run on the desktop. That's why Paul Thurrott sees Windows RT as less than Windows.

Quite a compelling product, and Arm rather than x86 the way it should be done, much cheaper and longer battery life are worth sacrificing legacy program support.

thealexweb said,
Quite a compelling product, and Arm rather than x86 the way it should be done, much cheaper and longer battery life are worth sacrificing legacy program support.

Agreed. There's no comparison between ARM and x86. ARM wins hands down every time for mobile devices.