Asustek launches quad-LAN server motherboard

To accommodate requirements in mass storage and fast transfer speeds in intranet applications of SMBs (small and medium business), Asustek Computer recently launched its P5M2-E/4L quad-LAN motherboard designed for servers.

The P5M2-E/4L, with a built in quad-LAN that integrates four high-speed Gigabit LAN ports into a single one, provides almost four times the transfer bandwidth. Even if an error occurs in one port, the network connection will not be affected in any way, according to Asustek. Strict networking performance tests have shown that the quad-LAN of the P5M2-E/4L can improve transfer performances up to 390% in comparison to a single LAN. Additionally, the four ports can also be used in individual sub-nets to provide secure data and smoother transfers.

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News source: DigiTimes

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6 Comments

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I think it's too bad the T2 (and T1) won't get much attention. It seems like a very nice chip, but the (server) market is unfortunately dominated by x86 platforms. It would be nice to see the Ultrasparc T1/T2, POWER6 and Cell get some market share in tasks where they perform better than x86s.

TCLN Ryster said,

Forgive me for being geeky enough to spot this... but why does that page have an XML extension when it clearly isn't an XML document, and why does my browser treat it as HTML when it's an XML file?


Extension means nothing since the "specification" are send in the html header (almost invisible for browser).

TCLN Ryster said,

Forgive me for being geeky enough to spot this... but why does that page have an XML extension when it clearly isn't an XML document, and why does my browser treat it as HTML when it's an XML file?

Magallanes is right that the doctype is what specifies how the browser should treat the file, but that is not the entire story. That file's original source is most likely xml, and the server applies an XSL Transformation or some other alteration of the original xml content to produce html markup. Think of this as similar behavior to how a server parses a php file and then outputs html to the browser, not php code.