ATI May Be Considering "Multi-Die GPUs" for R700 Family

After being late to market with high-performance graphics offerings for a number of times, ATI, graphics product group of Advanced Micro Devices, is reportedly considering high-end graphics solutions that utilize more than two or, perhaps, even more physical dice. The method has been successfully utilized by Intel Corp., but will it be feasible for graphics processors too?

ATI Radeon HD 2900 (R600) graphics chip, which contains about 700 million of transistors had power consumption of 160W, or even more, but still did not manage to demonstrate performance on par with Nvidia GeForce 8800 GTX, a solution that also demands high amount of power and is rather expensive to manufacture. But ATI Radeon HD 3800 (RV670) graphics processing unit (GPU), which is made using 55nm process technology, has the same amount of horsepower as R600, but is cheaper to build and consumes less amount of energy

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Glaff... Anyway, would having a second die be similar to a crossfire setup? Or is crossfire still it's own unique inovation which utilizes 2 separate lanes? (2 lanes more performance? Or can you get just as much from 1 lane dual die setup?)

They can't claim ATI as being "late" to the market. When it was Nvidia who moved up their release date just so they could get their card out earlier than it was ready for (which is why Nvidia never has any stock)

ATI uses newer technology on top of it. If anyone is "late" its Nvidia.

Also, they aren't "considering" it, its already proven from screenshots posted of the multiple gpu card. I assume it would be similar to crossfire, only instead of two cards you would have one card.

We definitely need more "dice" in our cards - great for playing snakes and ladders

"dice" is the plural of the word "die."

Indeed the "dice" you are referring to, as in 6-sided "dice", should be correctly referred to as "6-sided die."

Except we're not talking about the kind of die you roll around on the table for games of chance. We're talking about a small block of semiconducting material, on which a given functional circuit is fabricated. The plural of these are called "dies", not "dice."

Croquant said,
Except we're not talking about the kind of die you roll around on the table for games of chance. We're talking about a small block of semiconducting material, on which a given functional circuit is fabricated. The plural of these are called "dies", not "dice."

Both terms are correct, they can be called dies or dice.