AT&T reveals more details about upcoming ASUS PadFone X

During CES 2014, AT&T and ASUS announced the PadFone X. But, nearly six months have passed and we have yet to see this device on the market.  While details about the upcoming device have been scarce, AT&T finally debuted the PadFone X’s specifications late last month.

The PadFone X will launch with:

  • PadFone: 143.93 x 72.46 x 9.98 mm (150g)
  • PadFone Station: 250.4 x 172.25 x 11.63 mm (514g)
  • Android 4.4 (KitKat)
  • PadFone: 5”, 1920 x 1080 (441PPI)
  • PadFone Station: 9”, 1920 X 1200 (252PPI)​
  • PadFone: 13MP Pixel Master + 2MP front-facing
  • PadFone Station: 1MP front-facing
  • 2.3Ghz quad-core
  • Qualcomm Snapdragon 800
  • 16GB (2GB RAM)
  • microSD™ slot in smartphone extends external memory up to 64GB
  • WiFi (802.11 a/b/g/n/ac)
  • BT 4.0
  • GPS/aGPS​​
  • PadFone: 2,300mAh​​
  • PadFone Station: 4,990mAh

This month, AT&T is showing off some of the devices features by highlighting the devices DynamicDisplay and 13MP PixelMaster camera. The DynamicDisplay will allow a seamless transition from smartphone to tablet. The 13MP PixelMaster camera is enhanced for low light sensitivity and will also be able to take up to 35 pictures in burst mode.

While the design and concept are interesting, one has to wonder whether this device will be relevant due to the increased popularity of phablet devices. While other companies have abandoned this approach, ASUS has been persistent in sticking to its formula of creating two separate devices that can merge into one.

The PadFone X will be a newly re-designed, tablet + phone device and will be the ASUS’s third iteration in the PadFone series. Currently, the PadFone X is still without a release date. 

Source: AT&T | Image via ASUS

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8 Comments

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They both look way too chunky compared to most recent tablets and phones.

My LG G2 is smaller in every direction and has a larger screen (5.2") - it's just over 1mm thinner too and yet feels kinda chunky. The G2 I don't mind because of rounded corners, rounded back, and it has a big 3000mAh battery, not this anaemic 2300mAh number.

That tablet's bezels are way too big. It looks like a cheap throwback to a couple years ago.

It's a shame really, I'm a fan of a lot of ASUS hardware, their quality is usually very high too - often rates above Apple for reliability.

Phablets are terrible and inconvenient, this seems like a much better solution that is truly useful for at home and on the go, you can choose whatever device is appropriate.

Hard to ignore the sense this makes. I think a few years down the road this will be much more appealing than it is now though. Surprised Samsung isn't all over this with their Galaxy line...oh yeah, never mind.

I would love this with a Windows Phone 8/Windows 8 Pro solution that would allow for universal apps in phone, tablet, laptop, and desktop mode. My Dell Venue Pro 11 is so close to this I can see where in a few years, Microsoft will merge all of their operating systems and it will switch UI depending on the mode. Intel just needs to get managed power consumption down for their Core ix processors and MS needs to port WP to that architecture. It could be magical.

Drewidian said,
I would love this with a Windows Phone 8/Windows 8 Pro solution that would allow for universal apps in phone, tablet, laptop, and desktop mode. My Dell Venue Pro 11 is so close to this I can see where in a few years, Microsoft will merge all of their operating systems and it will switch UI depending on the mode. Intel just needs to get managed power consumption down for their Core ix processors and MS needs to port WP to that architecture. It could be magical.

WP already compiles for x86. The WP8 "emulator" is actually a virtual PC. If you clone the VHD to a disk you can actually boot it up. It is barely functional when running directly on the hardware though.

9 inch display? Could probably fit a 20 inch screen in without those mile-wide bezels.

Jesus Christ how horrifying.

A thinner bezel would be nicer, but wouldn't that present a structural problem? There's probabl some stuff in thebezelto give the tablet some resistance while holding the phone firmly in and not allowing it to slip so easil out.