Australia's NBN secured as Labor wins election

The future of Australia's national broadband network (NBN) has been secured, with the Australian Labor Party winning the election 17 days after polls closed.

Put on hold as Australia's political leaders struggled to woo independents elected by Australian votes to support their party, Australia's next-generation broadband plan will now go ahead as planned, with the hopes of making Australia's broadband offerings one of the fastest in the world.

Australia's NBN project, which will cost the government around $43 billion over the course of eight years, will bring fibre-optic connections to almost 93% of Australian homes with speeds of up to 1Gbps for most premises. The remaining 7% of homes will receive a mix of next-generation wireless and satellite services, with both eventually providing speeds of up to 12Mbps.

The project was thrown into chaos when no clear party was elected by Australian voters 17 days ago, with the company's future put in doubt as the coalition promised to dump what it called a "white elephant" and expensive waste of taxpayers money, offering their own cheaper broadband plans.

But today the NBN corporation welcomed the announcement surrounding Australia's political future, saying the confirmation Julia Gillard's Labor government will remain in power for the next three or so years provides "clarity", with the company quickly working to put into action "deferred processes".

"NBN Co’s management and its 300 employees welcome the clarity that today’s announcements provides in relation to the future of the NBN," the company said in a statement after today's announcement.

"We will now work to restore deferred processes, including the recruitment of staff."

The company will now meet with shareholder ministers to plan out "future policy directions".

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Lets provide some facts to the FUD (Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt) here.

1) The NBN is being rolled out by a large consortium of suppliers and independent contractors. Not Telstra.

The NBN is being constructed by the NBN Co. that is completely separate from Telstra and has nothing to do with it at a management level.

The NBN Co. is purchasing access rights for around $11B from Telstra to their ducts and pipes to place the new fiber in and as compensation to scrap the copper network currently in place.

The new fiber network will be entirely operated by the NBN Co. which has majority government ownership. Not Telstra. And it is unlikely Telstra will own any significant stake in it.

The NBN Co. will only sell at a wholesale level to retailers who will then on-sell it to consumers at their own pricing structures.

What @reLapse states about it giving power to Telstra is completely false and pretty much every single major ISP in Australia supports the NBN. The only ISP's who don't supply wireless services or private fiber networks (Known on dark fiber) who would be directly disadvantaged by the NBN since they are experiencing such strong growth due to the stranglehold of Testra on fixed line services and the demand for a current alternative.

2) The price that keeps being trotted out of $43B being paid by the government (Now they are claiming it will be up to $60B!) is false.

The report commissioned into determining the best way to roll out the NBN and the approximate costs of building the network gave figures of between $32B and $42B depending on what deal could be made with Telstra. ($32B with their calculation of what the Telstra assets were worth, $43B if they ignored Telstra entirely and built it on their own).

After the deal with Telstra the estimated roll-out cost is estimated to be around $38B, not $43B.

Of this $38B only around $20B is expected to come from the public purse, the remainder is to come from normal capital raising activities (private borrowing, private investment, non-majority share sales). This will be spread out over around 8 years as construction takes place.

It has been estimated in the report that the NBN will achieve a return on investment in around 10-15 years. Thus all the money invested by the government will come back plus interest in around 10-15 years. This leads on to point 3.

3) The NBN does not need to be costed. It seems people don't understand what costings mean.

Promises of funding to drive projects and maintenance generally need to be costed as these are cash injections of taxpayer money to fund projects and services.

Infrastructure investments such as the NBN generally do not need to be costed as they are asset investments instead of costs. Only the interest portions and some of the costs paid by the government come into costings. The remainder does not come into it as it is an asset that can be sold or achieve a return on investment.

What the NBN needed was the report produced regarding the implementation feasibility study. The thing the NBN needed that the government did not do and should have done was a full cost-benefit study to ensure they were getting enough bang for their bucks. However I think that if they did do a cost-benefit study it would show that the NBN has by far the best benefits for Australia compared to the alternatives.

4) Fiber is the only way to go for the future. There is no technology currently on the cards to replace it and we are hitting the fundamental limits of copper based and hybrid optic fiber - coaxial cable based technology.

We have to go fiber eventually as demand is pushing for it and we cannot expect Telstra to provide it. Look at how long it took for us to get past dial up with Telstra. It took government intervention and legislation to unbundle the loops and let competitors in offering DSL to force them to start upping their service.

Wireless will never be a substitute for fiber, it is strongly complementary however. Wireless cannot reach fiber speeds or bandwidth while fiber cannot reach the same broad range convenience and reach as wireless.

Ultimately wireless station have to be plugged into a fiber backbone and for high-performance applications you will always need to be plugged into that backbone.


I hope this can help clarify some things. Feel free to go back to some original source documents regarding my statements and figures (I give no promise on the exact precision of my figures but they are round the mark as far as I am aware) but please stop listening to the tired biased tripe coming out of some politicians and news agencies. Go to the figures, get the reports and check the legislation to make up your own minds if it's a good plan or not.

mackenziepricee said,

We don't have any money. It is all borrowed.

Just like every single other country on the planet. Go study some economics. Australia has a nett debt of 6% of GDP which is one of the lowest in the world and the lowest out of all first-world economies. Looks at Europe, UK and USA?

Most prominent economist on the planet have said that the Australia economy is one of the best in the world and that labors handling of the GFC was one of the best in the world.

Yipppppeeeeeeee.... now all labor has to do is hire a bus, some sexy cheerleaders and go from town to town promoting the NBN..
Internode's price for the big one
Home-Fibre High-100 Mbps down / 8 Mbps up 200 Gbytes $159.95.
still to costly for me, will wait till its $69,95

$42 Billion is a lot of taxpayer coin, I can see this is going to drastically increase the taxes for Australians, kinda glad I no longer live downunder.
Want to see Socialism in action just look at the USA and the crash course they're heading on.

I think it would've been better for private companies to build a fiber optic network around Australia and at least taxpayers wouldn't be on the hook for a $42 billion bill.

xpablo said,
$42 Billion is a lot of taxpayer coin, I can see this is going to drastically increase the taxes for Australians, kinda glad I no longer live downunder.
$43b divided by 8 years = $5.375b per year.

Population of Australia, 22 million. $5.375b/22m = $244 per year on average per capita.

Assuming it's all from taxes. Assuming it's entirely "new" money, and not stuff that would come out of what you're already paying. Assuming everyone would pay the same, which they wouldn't.

It's not "cheap", but it's not breaking the bank.

Kirkburn said,
$43b divided by 8 years = $5.375b per year.

Population of Australia, 22 million. $5.375b/22m = $244 per year on average per capita.

Assuming it's all from taxes. Assuming it's entirely "new" money, and not stuff that would come out of what you're already paying. Assuming everyone would pay the same, which they wouldn't.

It's not "cheap", but it's not breaking the bank.

To break it down even further, if 8 million households signed up for it, then the 43 billion broken down becomes about 5 thousand over the 8 year period, so to break it down even further would give us a monthly cost of roughly $53 for 96 months to have the NBN pay for its self. but that is providing you get the 8 million households to sign up and this doesnt include the isp charges

Kirkburn said,
$43b divided by 8 years = $5.375b per year.

Population of Australia, 22 million. $5.375b/22m = $244 per year on average per capita.

Assuming it's all from taxes. Assuming it's entirely "new" money, and not stuff that would come out of what you're already paying. Assuming everyone would pay the same, which they wouldn't.

It's not "cheap", but it's not breaking the bank.

It is a lot of money when you compare it to the other crazy promises this government has made.

mackenziepricee said,

It is a lot of money when you compare it to the other crazy promises this government has made.

As opposed to Abbotts $30-odd billion dollar election promises that he refused to let treasury cost? (Since he know that there was an $11B hole in them)

Yeah awesome, faster porn....not like $40B (ignoring the fact that it is likely to cost more), could be used for many other infrastructure projects. Also this is the same government that wants a internet filter and questionable data retention policies.

Some twits just hear faster internet and wet yourselves dont you without thinking of anything else.

Osiris said,
Yeah awesome, faster porn....not like $40B (ignoring the fact that it is likely to cost more), could be used for many other infrastructure projects. Also this is the same government that wants a internet filter and questionable data retention policies.

Some twits just hear faster internet and wet yourselves dont you without thinking of anything else.

The problem with democracy. Idiots who have no idea are still allowed to vote.

1) The Filter's dead. The Greens are against it, and they hold balance of power in the Senate.

2) Labor only got a minority government with 74 votes. It could easily be killed at any time by the L/N coalition. A loss of 11 seats should serve as a fierce rebuke.

Also, all her victory cost was $10 billion in pork to the two indy MPs she bought. Can she even afford the NBN now?

Osiris said,
Yeah awesome, faster porn....
Sure that's all the internet is or ever will be used for. No work done online.</sarcasm>

I am glad that The Coalition's (weak) broadband plan never eventuated, it was under fire for not being costed properly anyway.

While Labor's plan excites me, but I do worry that I heard that fibre lasts for 15 years when it is being run into people's homes and for 25 years in the conduits in the ground. I hope this isn't going to turn into a maintenance nightmare.

I hope someone will clarify that for me before they start building.

Jelly2003 said,
I am glad that The Coalition's (weak) broadband plan never eventuated, it was under fire for not being costed properly anyway.

While Labor's plan excites me, but I do worry that I heard that fibre lasts for 15 years when it is being run into people's homes and for 25 years in the conduits in the ground. I hope this isn't going to turn into a maintenance nightmare.

I hope someone will clarify that for me before they start building.

Thats rubbish pretty much. One of the benefits of a fiber network over a copper one is that fiber has a vastly longer lifespan which leads to much lower maintenance cost. It just cost more to install in the first place. Fiber is already used as the backbone of the internet with submerged cables carrying all the traffic between different countries. Our data is carried over a number of undersea cables between here and the US. And they are rated as having a 25-40 year lifespan being laid on the bottom of the ocean but they don't know because they haven't had a single one degrade or break naturally yet (and they have been down there 20-30 years now). The only place I can see them getting their 25 year max lifespan claim is the fact that networks cabled with fiber optics are being rated as having a 25 year lifespan. That is the network, not the cables themselves. Upgrades to the network typically take place on the end-points, not replacing the cables themselves. This is compared to our current system using copper cables that are rated with an 8 year lifespan and need maintenance and upgrades every 3-4 years.

And they have already built a large section in Tasmania where they are testing the roll out.

This NBN was not accounted/costed by "Treasury". It's is highly unlikely that the budget will be in surplus within two years. What's even more highly unlikely is this Government staying in power for 6 months. They do not have the majority of primary votes and secondary votes and certainly have no mandate "by the people" whatsoever. Gillard was "selected", not "elected". Higher taxes and failed plans and costings will be the downfall of this Labor Government. You can also say bye-bye to the 3 Independents who did not talk with their electorate who clearly voted roughly 20% more for the Libs than Labor in the Independents electorates.

This NBN won't work anyway. Like will all of current Labors plans, it's about to blowout to $63 billion as predicted. At approx. $150 (higher costings than a single Telstra plan) to connect to the fiber network per month with limited data, I doubt that many will jump on board when the vast majority of the population use the internet to surf the web, check their mail and download a few songs here and there. You can easily stream 1080p videos on YouTube with the current internet. Yes, it needs to be improved but there is no reason why private companies can't do it. And with a vastly spread out population, it isn't viable, we're not Europe.

Give it 6 months and we'll be calling for an election.

Edit: I currently pay $69 for 200gb of data ADS2+ with Telstra. Quite happy with my download speeds.

Billus said,
This NBN was not accounted/costed by "Treasury". It's is highly unlikely that the budget will be in surplus within two years.

Hello Lib voter or is that Tony Abbott? Do you remember internet speeds ten years ago? We had dial up speeds, with most people saying we don't need anything faster. Can you see yourself using dial up today?

Gerry said,

Hello Lib voter or is that Tony Abbott? Do you remember internet speeds ten years ago? We had dial up speeds, with most people saying we don't need anything faster. Can you see yourself using dial up today?

Na, Tony isn't that stupid; he is probably the same idiot at Telstra who said 8 years ago that there as no content on the internet requiring broadband. I wish there was the 'annual culling of the MBA holders' to purge society of people who add no value to it.

Billus said,
This NBN was not accounted/costed by "Treasury". It's is highly unlikely that the budget will be in surplus within two years. What's even more highly unlikely is this Government staying in power for 6 months. They do not have the majority of primary votes and secondary votes and certainly have no mandate "by the people" whatsoever. Gillard was "selected", not "elected". Higher taxes and failed plans and costings will be the downfall of this Labor Government. You can also say bye-bye to the 3 Independents who did not talk with their electorate who clearly voted roughly 20% more for the Libs than Labor in the Independents electorates.

This NBN won't work anyway. Like will all of current Labors plans, it's about to blowout to $63 billion as predicted. At approx. $150 (higher costings than a single Telstra plan) to connect to the fiber network per month with limited data, I doubt that many will jump on board when the vast majority of the population use the internet to surf the web, check their mail and download a few songs here and there. You can easily stream 1080p videos on YouTube with the current internet. Yes, it needs to be improved but there is no reason why private companies can't do it. And with a vastly spread out population, it isn't viable, we're not Europe.

Give it 6 months and we'll be calling for an election.

Edit: I currently pay $69 for 200gb of data ADS2+ with Telstra. Quite happy with my download speeds.


That is nice so because your happy with your download speeds, we should scap the NBN? what about the rest of us in the country and outskirts of major cities getting majorly ripped off? and given sub-par download speeds? part of NBN is bringing high speed internet to all Australians, not just those fortunate enough to live in the big smoke. There are always people who resist change because they are happy with the status quo, it's like when broadband just started up and dial-up was still the norm. Plenty of nay sayers then too claiming the general populous would never need such "obscenely" fast internet connections and dial-up was all we'd ever need...imagine if those people got their own way!

However, I do [unfortunately] agree with you on the costing...I fully expect it to majorly blow out since Labor are incapable of budgeting anything properly (Myki anyone?), which is a shame but doesn't change my stance on the NBN needing to be done.

Xerxes said,

That is nice so because your happy with your download speeds, we should scap the NBN? what about the rest of us in the country and outskirts of major cities getting majorly ripped off? and given sub-par download speeds? part of NBN is bringing high speed internet to all Australians, not just those fortunate enough to live in the big smoke. There are always people who resist change because they are happy with the status quo, it's like when broadband just started up and dial-up was still the norm. Plenty of nay sayers then too claiming the general populous would never need such "obscenely" fast internet connections and dial-up was all we'd ever need...imagine if those people got their own way!

However, I do [unfortunately] agree with you on the costing...I fully expect it to majorly blow out since Labor are incapable of budgeting anything properly (Myki anyone?), which is a shame but doesn't change my stance on the NBN needing to be done.

I live outside the city thank you very much. I've been fortunate enough to get ADSL2+ since the amount of people living in the area I live in has tripled in the last 4-5 years.

I did fail to mention in my previous post that I do agree that we should provide rural Australia with fast internet, but laying down cables across the outback isn't likely gonna to work. Wireless is the way forward, particularly outside major cities. Most people use the internet on the go by using phones and laptops so improving wireless technology should be the main focus in my opinion. Improving wireless technology AND pushing the price down.

With the NBN needing to be done, I say let private investors/companies do it. The government doesn't need to get its hands dirty on everything. They can't run hospitals, they can't run schools, they can't run power stations, they can't run public transport, they can't build roads; what makes you think they can run a National Broadband Network?

Billus said,

I live outside the city thank you very much. I've been fortunate enough to get ADSL2+ since the amount of people living in the area I live in has tripled in the last 4-5 years.

I did fail to mention in my previous post that I do agree that we should provide rural Australia with fast internet, but laying down cables across the outback isn't likely gonna to work. Wireless is the way forward, particularly outside major cities. Most people use the internet on the go by using phones and laptops so improving wireless technology should be the main focus in my opinion. Improving wireless technology AND pushing the price down.

With the NBN needing to be done, I say let private investors/companies do it. The government doesn't need to get its hands dirty on everything. They can't run hospitals, they can't run schools, they can't run power stations, they can't run public transport, they can't build roads; what makes you think they can run a National Broadband Network?

I'm not sure wireless technology is ready for such a large scale deployment though? I understand it's come a long way and there is definitely technology that can do the job (like WiMAX or similar technology) but it can't (yet) deliver the speed but can it cope with the demand it'll be put under? it's all well and good saying we can invest in making it better and more affordable, but how much will be enough? this could easily blow out to more then we bargained for as well.

As to the government running the NBN, I feel more comfortable with government running it then letting Telstra having free reign over it (I'm aware Telstra are helping build it, but the gov still controls it) and providing the government holds to their word, once the NBN is full functional they will hand down control to the private companies anyway. Hopefully this will give all the private companies even footing and allow for some healthly competition between them, further bringing down the prices. Allowing them to build it from scratch like the Coalition were promising is just asking for trouble to be honest and is no guarantee it'll ever get done and I'm sure big companies like Telstra would try to muscle in and cause trouble too. That is my 2 cents anyway so take with a grain of salt.

Edited by Xerxes, Sep 7 2010, 12:46pm :

Billus said,

I live outside the city thank you very much. I've been fortunate enough to get ADSL2+ since the amount of people living in the area I live in has tripled in the last 4-5 years.

I did fail to mention in my previous post that I do agree that we should provide rural Australia with fast internet, but laying down cables across the outback isn't likely gonna to work. Wireless is the way forward, particularly outside major cities. Most people use the internet on the go by using phones and laptops so improving wireless technology should be the main focus in my opinion. Improving wireless technology AND pushing the price down.

With the NBN needing to be done, I say let private investors/companies do it. The government doesn't need to get its hands dirty on everything. They can't run hospitals, they can't run schools, they can't run power stations, they can't run public transport, they can't build roads; what makes you think they can run a National Broadband Network?

You do also realise that wireless can be very easily congested (do you have a phone service with anyone besides Telstra, well even including them if you go to a music festival/sports event). Fibre will have to be rolled out to all the wireless locations as well anyway. Not to mention fibre isn't the solution to every Australian home, 93%, some places aren't feasible.

There is no doubt this will cost alot of money, but it the long term it will be worth it and allow consumers more competitive pricing and options for their internet access.

Billus said,
This NBN was not accounted/costed by "Treasury". It's is highly unlikely that the budget will be in surplus within two years. What's even more highly unlikely is this Government staying in power for 6 months. They do not have the majority of primary votes and secondary votes and certainly have no mandate "by the people" whatsoever. Gillard was "selected", not "elected". Higher taxes and failed plans and costings will be the downfall of this Labor Government. You can also say bye-bye to the 3 Independents who did not talk with their electorate who clearly voted roughly 20% more for the Libs than Labor in the Independents electorates.

This NBN won't work anyway. Like will all of current Labors plans, it's about to blowout to $63 billion as predicted. At approx. $150 (higher costings than a single Telstra plan) to connect to the fiber network per month with limited data, I doubt that many will jump on board when the vast majority of the population use the internet to surf the web, check their mail and download a few songs here and there. You can easily stream 1080p videos on YouTube with the current internet. Yes, it needs to be improved but there is no reason why private companies can't do it. And with a vastly spread out population, it isn't viable, we're not Europe.

Give it 6 months and we'll be calling for an election.

Edit: I currently pay $69 for 200gb of data ADS2+ with Telstra. Quite happy with my download speeds.

You seem to know what you're talking about.

If anyone had a bit of common sense, check out Labors track record over the last 3 years and see what they have delivered.

If you think the NBN is going to work with out huge blowout costs, you have got to be joking

mackenziepricee said,

You seem to know what you're talking about.

If anyone had a bit of common sense, check out Labors track record over the last 3 years and see what they have delivered.

If you think the NBN is going to work with out huge blowout costs, you have got to be joking

Check the coalition record for the 11 years prior. Sure we got to a surplus but only because of the mining boom and the fact that there was no investment in the country in terms of infrastructure and services. Hell we only go into that surplus by selling off most the assets the government owed, offloading the public debt onto the private sector. And even that was riddled with huge blowouts.

Even if the NBN does blowout, cost more and take more time, it will be an asset to the country.

And in the past 3 years of labor government we have had the rollback of workchoices and establishment of the fair work system, to development of the national clean energy corridor, the construction of test areas of the NBN (that have come in 10% under budget and time constraints), the BER (which even for the waste still stimulated the economy very well and developed much needed improvements in school infrastructure), the computers in schools program, more trade training centres and numerous other improvements in our infrastructure and systems.

Hell it was the labor governments achievements over the past 3 years compared to the 11 before that which nearly got Bob Katter to side with them! Go listen to some of his news conferences where he tells the coalition, "why should I side with you given that labor has done more for country Australia over the past 3 years than the coalition over the 11 before that?"

Roughly $5.4 billion dollars a year, for 8 years, seems like overkill. Hopefully it won't turn out to be a big waste of money (which is entirely possible). Of course that is, if a new type of broadband Internet technology is invented that exceeds fibre-optics in cost efficiency and speed.

Bemani Dog said,
Hopefully?

Its labour.. They just need to make sure they controll this one unless the ones in the past

Btw anyone want a new hall? I have some spare..

Anaron said,
Roughly $5.4 billion dollars a year, for 8 years, seems like overkill. Hopefully it won't turn out to be a big waste of money (which is entirely possible). Of course that is, if a new type of broadband Internet technology is invented that exceeds fibre-optics in cost efficiency and speed.
I don't expect anything in particular is going to replace fibre-optics any time soon. The materials might improve, the bandwidth might improve (which I'm sure is already expected), but switching to a new method of communication (think quantum entanglement) I don't think is particularly near. Besides, you have to do it at _some_ point, can't keep waiting for the new biggest thing.

Any new technology that comes out would likely take time to roll out again anyway so we won't see it in homes any time soon. Besides, I'm pretty sure fiber is pretty scalable and as technology improves they can just replace nodes at the exchange as needed without replacing the entire line.

Wireless may become more and more feasable but its still important to have a reliable point to point infrastructure too. I wouldn't want hospitals and the like relying solely on wireless TBH.

Kirkburn said,
I don't expect anything in particular is going to replace fibre-optics any time soon. The materials might improve, the bandwidth might improve (which I'm sure is already expected), but switching to a new method of communication (think quantum entanglement) I don't think is particularly near. Besides, you have to do it at _some_ point, can't keep waiting for the new biggest thing.
True, the likely outcome may be small improvements here and there; however, it's definitely something to think of considering the fact that this is a huge investment in terms of cost, time, and infrastructure. If a new breakthrough is made in broadband Internet technology, then it would be a major blow to the project.

Bemani Dog said,
Hopefully?
Yes, hopefully. As I said before, if a new technology comes out that's cheaper and better than fibre-optics then the project will turn out to be a waste of time and money.

NBN is the only good thing to come out of today's Labor "win". Let's have Neowin make an article about Conroy's awesome filter.

Nashy said,
NBN is the only good thing to come out of today's Labor "win". Let's have Neowin make an article about Conroy's awesome filter.

Hopefully it doesn't make it through the senate. From the little I know about our politics the greens don't want the filter and they hold the majority in the senate.

I think it's dead. It's already put on hold for about 12 months in the lead up to the election and even if they want to revive it the Senate can quite easily block it with the strength Greens have there (who are adamant they won't support it) with the rest probably relying on Coalition also being against it.

Conroy about a month ago was quoted as saying it's probably dead because even if he wanted it he won't be able to pass it through parliamant and there is no way for him to get around that.

Mr Spoon said,
Over 8 years though?
But then technology never actually moves as quick as I would like. The UK's broadband state is the same.

8 years is a short amount of time to construct the countries biggest civil work project EVER. Think to how long it takes to build single highways, then think if you were replacing the entire road network, then think that the telephone network actually travels much much further then the road network does

bits said,

8 years is a short amount of time to construct the countries biggest civil work project EVER. Think to how long it takes to build single highways, then think if you were replacing the entire road network, then think that the telephone network actually travels much much further then the road network does

Agreed, one tunnel they are building up the road from me has taken them a good few years of work, and it's still a not likely to be finished before 2012!

Mr Spoon said,
Over 8 years though?
But then technology never actually moves as quick as I would like. The UK's broadband state is the same.

More like 11 years. This mob promised the same thing last election and didn't deliever and with the track record, 11 years would be a record.

Good news, now we can move on with our lives and hurray for NBN. Can't wait till the day when the whole nation is fully connected with a powerful backbone. No more need to go outside for data centers and website hosting.

I was holding my breathe throughout the announcement in hope of the independents siding with Labor. The coalition would have sent us backwards in terms of internet.
May we "move forward" (thanks Julia )

Ently said,
If I still lived in Australia I would be so happy right now!

Trust me, you wouldn't be. Another 3 years under this useless government will be hell.

brent3000 said,
this is not a good thing

Why is this not a good thing? Apart from the matter of opinions and political stuff, internet will be the backbone of this country. Without that we can't get more far than this decade. Our co-ax network is so so so old that it is dead. I work 20 KM from CBD and we are stuck at 2Mb/640Kb premium line at the cost of $650/month.

I welcome NBN regardless of it's impending cost issues.

wrack said,
I work 20 KM from CBD and we are stuck at 2Mb/640Kb premium line at the cost of $650/month.
Surely that is a typo matey. I too paid a premium before ADSL2+ came to my neighborhood but even that was $80/month for 8Mb down.

Hot said,
Surely that is a typo matey. I too paid a premium before ADSL2+ came to my neighborhood but even that was $80/month for 8Mb down.
Either that or he is a liberal supporter and believes Abbott's tripe about it being a white elephant.

Hot said,
Surely that is a typo matey. I too paid a premium before ADSL2+ came to my neighborhood but even that was $80/month for 8Mb down.

Nah no typo. A premium business grade internet from Pacific with 20 IP Address range. Now given that the IPs do come at a cost but even at that price, it's too darn expensive!

Hot said,
Surely that is a typo matey. I too paid a premium before ADSL2+ came to my neighborhood but even that was $80/month for 8Mb down.

Adsl2+ at my premises can only deliver 1.3mbit/sec down max and is highly unstable. I live in a suburb only 10km out from the CBD. I look forward to Australia having internet connection that work for all premises not just the selected few that luck being close to an exchange which is serviced by a competitive ISP on a decent line.

I welcome the decision to turf the the old copper telephone network we currently have to limb on with and replace it with current technology.

Xerxes said,
Either that or he is a liberal supporter and believes Abbott's tripe about it being a white elephant.
Please ignore the quoted text in my previous reply, I was meaning to reply to the OP! I misread the post above me, not having a good day...sorry about that.

wrack said,
Nah no typo. A premium business grade internet from Pacific with 20 IP Address range. Now given that the IPs do come at a cost but even at that price, it's too darn expensive!

Excuse me but that is commercial grade, what is being discussed by most people here is what residents are going to get. As for the cost, the biggest cost is the international bandwidth which would have been better spent laying a massive cable to the US to reduce the over all data costs.

NBN 1 25 / 2 Mbps 5GB + 5GB $49.95
NBN 2 25 / 2 Mbps 10GB + 10GB $59.95
NBN 3 25 / 2 Mbps 30GB + 30GB $69.95
NBN 4 50 / 4 Mbps 30GB + 30GB $89.95
NBN 5 50 / 4 Mbps 50GB + 50GB $99.95
NBN 6 100 / 8 Mbps 60GB + 60GB $129.95
NBN 7 100 / 8 Mbps 90GB + 90GB $159.95
--------------------------------------------------

Currently i pay $80-$90 for Optus DOCSIS 3.0 85gb/85gb and speeds of 100/2

Thats the last set of pricing i have seen for the NBN.

Dont get me wrong the infrastructure is a good idea... But so every farm house and every back yard farm in the middle of nothing and no where getting fibre? I think thats abit over the top.. Throw some wireless towers out their and give the farmers and people out in the west some form of wireless funded data... If they have no or very slow speeds then wireless should be enough for them untill it becomes worth it to roll fibre down their street.

$600 for a business grade connection speed... Thats nothing new... I work for an ISP and i sign out $600 per month Ethernet lines to city connections (but they the price for you would be the IP i would gather)

As said... Lay down the fibre for city/dense business areas but not out to joe blow in the middle of no where who has to stuffer from ADSL speeds. Then as others say more lines to the US etc to bring down data costs to the US etc... Data is the killer for this country.. Only recently has data capps been going up (1tb ADSL plans)

/rant

brent3000 said,
NBN 1 25 / 2 Mbps 5GB + 5GB $49.95
NBN 2 25 / 2 Mbps 10GB + 10GB $59.95
NBN 3 25 / 2 Mbps 30GB + 30GB $69.95
NBN 4 50 / 4 Mbps 30GB + 30GB $89.95
NBN 5 50 / 4 Mbps 50GB + 50GB $99.95
NBN 6 100 / 8 Mbps 60GB + 60GB $129.95
NBN 7 100 / 8 Mbps 90GB + 90GB $159.95
--------------------------------------------------

Those prices are only available to what, two or three locations in Australia? The technology is just being released! You can't expect it to be what ADSL2+ is right now immediately. As more people get connected the price will be driven down because consumers just won't buy it.

brent3000 said,
But so every farm house and every back yard farm in the middle of nothing and no where getting fibre?

Why not? These "farms" get power, why not fibre?

brent3000 said,
Data is the killer for this country.. Only recently has data capps been going up (1tb ADSL plans)

If hosting was cheaper in Australia than more providers will host data here, and there will not be a "data" problem. The plan caps are from Telstra, and not from technology limits.

brent3000 said,
NBN 1 25 / 2 Mbps 5GB + 5GB $49.95
NBN 2 25 / 2 Mbps 10GB + 10GB $59.95
NBN 3 25 / 2 Mbps 30GB + 30GB $69.95
NBN 4 50 / 4 Mbps 30GB + 30GB $89.95
NBN 5 50 / 4 Mbps 50GB + 50GB $99.95
NBN 6 100 / 8 Mbps 60GB + 60GB $129.95
NBN 7 100 / 8 Mbps 90GB + 90GB $159.95
--------------------------------------------------

Currently i pay $80-$90 for Optus DOCSIS 3.0 85gb/85gb and speeds of 100/2

Thats the last set of pricing i have seen for the NBN.

Dont get me wrong the infrastructure is a good idea... But so every farm house and every back yard farm in the middle of nothing and no where getting fibre? I think thats abit over the top.. Throw some wireless towers out their and give the farmers and people out in the west some form of wireless funded data... If they have no or very slow speeds then wireless should be enough for them untill it becomes worth it to roll fibre down their street.

$600 for a business grade connection speed... Thats nothing new... I work for an ISP and i sign out $600 per month Ethernet lines to city connections (but they the price for you would be the IP i would gather)

As said... Lay down the fibre for city/dense business areas but not out to joe blow in the middle of no where who has to stuffer from ADSL speeds. Then as others say more lines to the US etc to bring down data costs to the US etc... Data is the killer for this country.. Only recently has data capps been going up (1tb ADSL plans)

/rant

Can you or someone else clarify these numbers for me.
We currently pay $59 a month for ADSL2+ which is around 7mb down and gives us 100gb/100gb per month.
For the same price under the NBN plan I would get considerably faster speeds but only a fraction of the monthly quota?

Strawmouth Pete said,
Can you or someone else clarify these numbers for me.
We currently pay $59 a month for ADSL2+ which is around 7mb down and gives us 100gb/100gb per month.
For the same price under the NBN plan I would get considerably faster speeds but only a fraction of the monthly quota?
Matt B said,
Those prices are only available to what, two or three locations in Australia? The technology is just being released! You can't expect it to be what ADSL2+ is right now immediately. As more people get connected the price will be driven down because consumers just won't buy it.

Like Matt said, these prices are temporary for the "test roll-out" in a few areas in Tasmania. The real cost is to be determined.

The_Decryptor said,
yay internet
cost the "Government" $43b my arse!

The taxpayers are paying for it, and that being the case the government had better NOT sell it off in the future and land us with another private company charging monopoly prices for its services.

dvb2000 said,
cost the "Government" $43b my arse!

The taxpayers are paying for it, and that being the case the government had better NOT sell it off in the future and land us with another private company charging monopoly prices for its services.


The government won't be able to sell it off, the NBN will belong to Telstra and that is why other major ISP's are up in arms about it.

I'm pretty sure Telstra won't own it, it's government infrastructure. They're paying Telstra about 8 to 11 billion or so in order to get access to their existing infrastructure. In fact the NBN is probably going to take a lot of wholesale power away from Telstra, not give them more.

Smigit said,
I'm pretty sure Telstra won't own it, it's government infrastructure. They're paying Telstra about 8 to 11 billion or so in order to get access to their existing infrastructure. In fact the NBN is probably going to take a lot of wholesale power away from Telstra, not give them more.

It will give them more, hence the distrust and anger fromt he other major ISP's.

NBN co will own the infrastructure, and be 100% separated from Telstra. It puts telstra on the same level as every other ISP in their ability to provide services over the infrastructure, that is why ISPs are SUPPORTING the NBN.