Average US broadband speed only 3.79Mbps

Akamai released a State of the Internet report for each quarter of the year. Their most recent report for Q4 of 2009 is now available. It shows that the average broadband speed in the US is 3792Kbps with just 57% broadband adoption.

Delaware has typically held the highest average speed over any of the states in the US. They took the top spot again this quarter with an average speed of 7.6Mbps. Vermont is second with 5.8Mbps and Massachusets is third with 5.7Mbps.

Asia continues to be the fastest with an average broadband speed of 4400Kbps. North America is second at 3792Kbps followed by Europe with 3536Kbps average broadband speed and 68% broadband adoption. Africa is the slowest continent at 944Kbps and only 11% broadband adoption.

The report also shows that of the 198 countries where attack traffic originated from Russia (13%) and the United States (12%) make up 25% of it holding the top two spots. One interesting note is that for Q3 of 2009 the US was only 6.9%. This means that the number of internet based attacks nearly doubled in the US over a period of just 3 months. Port 445 is the target of most of the attacks, this is the port where your network shares hang out. If your computer is behind a firewall and properly patched then it is not vulnerable.

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The problem with those numbers comes from the regions it is comparing. I have a 6mbps connection and pay 25 dollars a month for it. Consider that a slow DSL line is around 768 Kbps. My grandparents have that and it costs 5 dollars a month. They have no use for anything faster because all they do is play online checkers and check email friends and family. Now do the math for the older generation that is known for saving every nickel and dime and see how fast the national average falls. If it were just my grandparents and me, the average would be less than 3Mbps.

The statistic of who has the highest average speed is useless considering we have the choice of what we want to use. It doesn't mean that country X has slower speeds than country Y.

Interesting but perhaps somewhat misleading. When we are talking averages that takes in the very high: Berkeley, Princeton, and other university cities as well as rural DSL. I have experienced another anomaly. Testing on Speedtest.net my Time Warner Roadrunner consistently tested at a little over 3Mbps download and a little under 1Mbps upload. Then TW initiated their "PowerBoost" feature where downloaded files use extra bandwidth for I think the first 10MB to significantly increase download speed measurement on sites such as Speedtest.net. Immediately upon getting notification from TW of this feature, I retested and obtained DL speeds around 27Mbps where it has remained. Upload speeds still average .97Mbps.

I'm not complaining. I am happy with the new boost, especially without getting a boost in fees. I do want to point out "the devil is in the details" though. Downloads of large files (mostly games) have an obvious down tick in speed once the file size allowance is reached.

why don't we talk about speed in megabytes per second or in kilobytes per second instead of stupid megabits per second. Whenever we download a file from anywhere your speed never shows megabits per second. Non tech people always think that there getting 22megabytes per second when their cable provider puts 20MBPS when in reality they are only getting about 2mbps.

I love my speed. 16 Mbps with Charter for $39.99 (two year price lock, it may jump up to $64.99). They do some speed boost thing where speeds are almost doubled (around 25 Mbps - 32 Mbps download) the first few seconds of a transfer. Those few seconds are sometimes all that is needed to completely get the file. That means many downloads finish with an almost 3 MB/sec download speed.

The US really needs to step up it's game. I don't see why we don't have residential speeds remotely close to Asia's, surely over population isn't the problem. So, what gives? I mean most net plans here are unlimited, why not make that actually mean something? When I had just a 3mb plan I hardly downloaded just because of how slow it was so it didn't matter if it was unlimited or not. Now that I have 22mb plan, I'm taking full advantage of this unlimited thing.

What the fu*ck you complain, in my country my average speed is 100kbps and 13 kbps of upload. And you don't know how painful is to see you guys downloading at such speed.

Jose_49 said,
What the fu*ck you complain, in my country my average speed is 100kbps and 13 kbps of upload. And you don't know how painful is to see you guys downloading at such speed.

Probably not as painful as taking it up the ass in whatever backwards country you live in.

Jose_49 said,
What the fu*ck you complain, in my country my average speed is 100kbps and 13 kbps of upload. And you don't know how painful is to see you guys downloading at such speed.

Move to the USA!

I'm located in Las Vegas & my ISP, Cox Communications, just released its DOCSIS 3.0 broadband and now I'm getting 50mb down and 5.5mb up.

This report sounds pretty logical. We all know that Cable companies like to advertise very fast speeds but real world results are often variable.

With a mix of DSL connections with traditional 1.5mbps-3mbps and cable connections with 5mbps-10mbps, the average sounds just right.

It also proves what we've known all along, that the US data carriers are hindering the adoption of faster connections by pricing them way to high. This is why Google is motivated to put fiber in the hands of consumers just so they can knock the competition around a little bit.

iPhrankie said,
This report sounds pretty logical. We all know that Cable companies like to advertise very fast speeds but real world results are often variable.

With a mix of DSL connections with traditional 1.5mbps-3mbps and cable connections with 5mbps-10mbps, the average sounds just right.

It also proves what we've known all along, that the US data carriers are hindering the adoption of faster connections by pricing them way to high. This is why Google is motivated to put fiber in the hands of consumers just so they can knock the competition around a little bit.

While that is all certainly true, we can't forget about all the people that don't even want faster speeds. While the trends are changing, most people don't use the internet for more than checking their email and at most playing farmville. ISP's are slowing getting faster but only because there is no reason to move forward any faster than they are. Most of the public consists of sheep thinking 3 meg lines are something special and not needed unless you are a business. Can't blame the ISP's for finding an easy way to make money. They are just a business looking to make a quick buck.

57% broadband adoption O.O Man that's terrible. I've had to use dial-up at another location, and man was that tough, coming back from a DSL connection at the time.

Of course, with 18mbps now... I cringe at the thought.

Upload really needs to be worked on. I'm supposed to be much higher than I am now with my connection (I'm about 1.5 Mbps even though I should be over 2-2.5). Of course, much of it relies to the cabling and such. Still though, it could be improved a lot.

I'm in Miami, FL, on a just under 6.0MB AT&T connection. It's good. Love it. Still can't play HD videos on YouTube though. HD playback elsewhere on the Web is nice.

Nexus69 said,
and I was complaining about my symmetrical 50mpbs with surewest

Why would you complain about symmetrical 50mbps?!?!

Wow... you complained about SYMMETRICAL 50 Mbps? Spoiled.

We can't even get faster than 16Mbps here and that would be about $60/mo with cable.

Axon said,

Why would you complain about symmetrical 50mbps?!?!

I was being sarcastic...my friends enjoy my ftp dump though, I always tease them because they never even hit 50% of my connection

yardman said,
lol that's really slow!

It's an average. For everyone with a 10+Mbps connection there are probably a bunch of 1.5Mbps (or slower) connections out there.

That site is only listing the results that they have measured from people testing their speeds there (note that the US shows up at an average of over 7Mbps). Akami would be a much more reliable source since a large portion of the internet flows through their servers at some point.

roadwarrior said,
That site is only listing the results that they have measured from people testing their speeds there (note that the US shows up at an average of over 7Mbps). Akami would be a much more reliable source since a large portion of the internet flows through their servers at some point.

with over 1.433.500.000 speed tests taken, I think this source is very accurate as well!
btw, I want to live in Korea

TrOjAn. said,

with over 1.433.500.000 speed tests taken, I think this source is very accurate as well!
btw, I want to live in Korea

It's accurate for the small percentage of people who go to the site to test their speeds. More often than not, these are going to be the type of people who are going to be paying extra for a faster connection. It doesn't represent a good cross-section of the population though, which is why Akami's results are probably much more accurate.

Look at the land area size of those countries. I bet you could fit ALL of them within the state of Texas. THAT is one of the biggest problems with speed in the USA, we are so spread out, and there are pockets of land that have miles and miles between each house, it is just not economical to bury fiber or other high speed lines.

khiangteRock said,
http://speedtest.net/global.php#0

1 Republic of Korea 22.08 Mb/s
2 Aland Islands 18.92 Mb/s
3 Latvia 18.75 Mb/s
4 Japan 17.51 Mb/s
5 Romania 16.45 Mb/s
6 Lithuania 16.20 Mb/s
7 Sweden 15.09 Mb/s
8 Andorra 15.08 Mb/s
9 Netherlands 14.68 Mb/s
10 Bulgaria 14.64 Mb/s

And I thought my 7.5mbps is kinda slow

But seriously they need to increase upload. When I was in Hong Kong last year we get synchronous internet dirt cheap.