BBC launches global iPlayer app

The long awaited BBC iPlayer iPad app for the world is launching today, with 11 European countries being the first to have access to the subscription-based service. Australia, Canada and the United States are due to have access to the app later this year, as the BBC attempts to trial a worldwide iPlayer in a one-year pilot. The 11 countries to be included in the first part of the trial are Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg, The Republic of Ireland, The Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and Switzerland.

In a report from the Guardian, the application will offer a limited amount of content for free, which will involve pre-show advertising and sponsorship. The majority of content, however, will be under the subscription service which is due to cost users €6.99 a month or €49.99 for a year. The app will include a series of features that are not available in the United Kingdom version, including the streaming of shows via 3G and a downloading feature for offline viewing.

At launch, 1,500 hours of content will be available to users, with the large majority of content will be commissioned by the BBC. It has been confirmed however, that 10% of shows will be from other British broadcasters such as ITV's "Primeval" and Channel 4's "The Naked Chef". BBC.com's managing director, Luke Bradley-Jones, emphasized however that "[it] is not a catch-up service: this is a video-on-demand service. We will have content from the last month, but also the best from the catalogue stretching back 50 to 60 years." When talking about the content that would be available, he stated that users would be able to browse for specific shows or genres, with some being recommended by a team of dedicated editors for the global iPlayer app.

Those in the United States will have to wait a while longer, Mr Bradley-Jones provided an explanation as to why there's been a delay. He stated that the rights to media in the US were somewhat more complicated and means that the BBC have to "jump through a few more of those commercial and legal hoops." There were however hints as to how much it will cost for those in the states, with a figure of $7.99 being passed around, which is aimed to be competitive with Hulu and Netflix.

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MJR said,

It is a bbc worldwide product, but any profits that bbc worldwide make get ploughed back into bbc, which will incrase the already extremely high amounts of pay the executives of the BBC get.

Corrected it for you.

MJR said,

It is a bbc worldwide product, but any profits that bbc worldwide make get ploughed back into bbc, which will reduce the tv licence fee.

If only it would. Instead they'll just find more crap to spend it on.

I'm pro- having a publicly-funded broadcaster and I'm largely pro-BBC, but they don't half seem to waste a lot of money. The website, for example, is 75% genuine news, 25% absolute ****.

kurupy said,
And will they bring down the license fee in the UK due to these subscription fees? I'm guessing no...

Wait a minute... You need to by a license to watch tv over there? The ****? Never heard of that before... Kinda of like buying one to listen to music... What if you walk by a shop and it has the news on or something... Are you screwed if a cop passes by? Hell, even the cams they have all over the place. Seriously I feel for you folks.

i like bbc content it is much better than u.s. content.

AFineFrenzy said,
Now the whole world can enjoy the mediocre programming the BBC has to offer.

AFineFrenzy said,
Now the whole world can enjoy the mediocre programming the BBC has to offer.

The BBC's factual, documentary, and news programming is world class.

AFineFrenzy said,
Now the whole world can enjoy the mediocre programming the BBC has to offer.

Mediocre? Ah hahaha it's actually the best programming in the world.

AFineFrenzy said,
Now the whole world can enjoy the mediocre programming the BBC has to offer.

Im with the others, BBC's is far superior and so most the country. For example 5 out of 6 people watched the World Cup on BBC over ITV.

AFineFrenzy said,
Now the whole world can enjoy the mediocre programming the BBC has to offer.

Im with the others, BBC's is far superior and so most the country. For example 5 out of 6 people watched the World Cup on BBC over ITV.

SK[ said,]

Im with the others, BBC's is far superior and so most the country. For example 5 out of 6 people watched the World Cup on BBC over ITV.


Obviously! No Ads
Ummm I love the BBC Documentaries, I mean Planet Earth in HD... Wow.

For the love of GOD, BBC can you PLEASE stop pandering to Apple products and make things for ALL systems. Give the Windows PC some love for once, more people own one of those than a god damn iPad. You're supposed to love ALL systems, but in the past ten years you've REALLY gone anti-Microsoft.
And while you're at it, get Rory Cellan-Jones to stop beating MS products down ffs, he's supposed to be a "non-biased" journalist.
/rant

cleverclogs said,
For the love of GOD, BBC can you PLEASE stop pandering to Apple products and make things for ALL systems. Give the Windows PC some love for once, more people own one of those than a god damn iPad. You're supposed to love ALL systems, but in the past ten years you've REALLY gone anti-Microsoft.
And while you're at it, get Rory Cellan-Jones to stop beating MS products down ffs, he's supposed to be a "non-biased" journalist.
/rant

Haven't you heard? Bashing MS is cool.

cleverclogs said,
For the love of GOD, BBC can you PLEASE stop pandering to Apple products and make things for ALL systems. Give the Windows PC some love for once, more people own one of those than a god damn iPad. You're supposed to love ALL systems, but in the past ten years you've REALLY gone anti-Microsoft.
And while you're at it, get Rory Cellan-Jones to stop beating MS products down ffs, he's supposed to be a "non-biased" journalist.
/rant

You mean give the windows pc something like iPlayer???

cleverclogs said,
<snip>

The original iplayer was MS only until they got slammed in the local media and made it into a flash version.

n_K said,

The original iplayer was MS only until they got slammed in the local media and made it into a flash version.

It was Windows Media Audio/Video only, but that didn't restrict the platform on which you used it IIRC?

WelshBluebird said,
And why the hell do they allow downloading on this, but not the UK version of the app? And where is the iPhone version?

I haven't used iplayer in years, but when I last used it, there was downloading, needed to be on an MS pc with WMP which is a ****ing pain in the arse because it's got DRM and activates itself for 7 days then it won't play anymore.

n_K said,

I haven't used iplayer in years, but when I last used it, there was downloading, needed to
be on an MS pc with WMP which is a ****ing pain in the arse because it's got DRM and
activates itself for 7 days then it won't play anymore.


The BBC iPlayer website still offers downloads in WMV format, encumbered with MS DRM.
Although with Windows Media Player 10 on Windows XP, and a certain tool I won't name
here for obvious reasons, that particular type of DRM can be defeated.

The default downloads from the BBC iPlayer website use an "Adobefied" version of MP4,
that can only be downloaded via the BBC iPlayer Desktop application. This uses a form
of DRM made by Adobe, which (AFAIK) hasn't been cracked yet.

The thing that ****es me off the most about this is we in the UK pay £145.50 for a 'TV License' where a lot of that money goes to the BBC. I'd say most of it goes to them. And then they come out with this BBC iPlayer App for the whole world where they can subscribe for the minuscule sum of £74.04 a year. Pretty much half price.

So they (meaning the rest of the world) get all the original programming the BBC makes displayable for half the price that we pay for that programming even though its our BBC that is making it and we don't have a choice about if we want to pay or not, if we have a TV we have to pay it.

This really does annoy me a lot.

Vice said,

The thing that ****es me off the most about this is we in the UK pay £145.50 for a 'TV License'
where a lot of that money goes to the BBC. I'd say most of it goes to them. And then they
come out with this BBC iPlayer App for the whole world where they can subscribe for
the minuscule sum of £74.04 a year. Pretty much half price.

So they (meaning the rest of the world) get all the original programming the BBC makes
displayable for half the price that we pay for that programming even though its
our BBC that is making it and we don't have a choice about if we want to pay
or not, if we have a TV we have to pay it.

This really does annoy me a lot.


Except for the fact the global version of BBC iPlayer has NOTHING to do with the TV Licence.
It's a product of BBC Worldwide, the wholly owned commercial subsidiary of the BBC, which
takes absolutely NO MONEY WHATSOEVER from the TV Licence.

BBC Worldwide is a company that sells BBC products and merchandise internationally (such
as DVD's, coffee mugs, Doctor Who t-shirts and this new global version of the BBC iPlayer)
All BBC Worldwide profits are ploughed back into the main BBC, essentially subsidising it,
and complimenting what it gets from the TV Licence.

Old shows you can find in dozens of other places for free for $10 a month.........pass

Make it the same as in U.K. ffs

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