BBC News launches new portal for web-connected TVs

The BBC continues to extend its reach onto new platforms – a move that began with its vast and comprehensive website, and which gave a huge boost to online TV streaming in the UK with the launch of its popular iPlayer service that is widely available across phones, tablets and even consoles.

Today the corporation has announced the launch of a new platform for its globally renowned BBC News division, making its services available through the growing range of internet-enabled TVs.

The initiative was first announced several months ago and since then BBC teams have been developing the new service that will bring video packages to the big screen as well as being able to browse text news stories if desired. Although the full range of video available on the BBC News website will not be available through the TV service, video clips and packages will be chosen from the BBC’s considerable regional, national, and international news resources.

The product will launch first on Samsung’s web TV platform, moving to other systems in time, and will only be available to UK television license fee payers. The BBC has worked closely with Samsung on developing this first version, but is seeking to work with other manufacturers to expand the availability of the product, which is built in HTML, but designed for big screen viewing and navigation with a TV remote control.

The launch of this new product is part of an overall BBC vision called ‘connected storytelling’, which is summed up as ‘one service, ten products, four screens’. Having already established a presence on the web, phones, and tablets, today’s launch strengthens the BBC’s presence on the TV which was previously only available through the Wii and PlayStation 3.

Multi-platform access to services is increasingly important to broadcasters and other content providers: Last week Sky announced that it would be making its channels and content available to its ten million customers on computers, mobiles, and tablets free of charge.

Image and source: BBC News

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9 Comments

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Well, I prefer BBC News UK. I find it non-biased as well as interesting. I also enjoy watching iPlayer for its variety of available contents. I prefer it over US contents. BBC has been updating its iPlayer Desktop and it gets better. Just as with any provider it all involves variety and contents. BBC does a good job of this.

Win7 Ultimate - Windows Media Center - has this feature but you must be in the UK. But I feel that BBC should start offering their services worldwide with a minimal subscription plan. Most Americans already watch British stuff with out even realizing and it is showed in the US already. One has to be able to have seen it live to realize this though. I am not referring to BBC America. Eastenders has a good chance depending on the time slot. It is good on the early evening during week nites (4 days normally) as well as the Omnibus on Sundays after brunch and tea.

"The BBC continues to extend its reach onto new platforms - a move that began with its vast and comprehensive website, and which gave a huge boost to online TV streaming in the UK with the launch of its popular iPlayer service that is widely available across phones, tablets and even consoles."

haha that part made me laugh!, the bbc iplayer app for the ipad 2 has not been working for a few weeks now! they need to sort out what they already have!

clickbouyow said,
If only they would make it available to the world, then it would be worth it.

The US can have iPlayer if we can have Netflix/Hulu etc.

Though tbh, I don't like the way fans are getting screwed over in this way. This is part of the reason people resort to file sharing.

smooth_criminal1990 said,

The US can have iPlayer if we can have Netflix/Hulu etc.

Though tbh, I don't like the way fans are getting screwed over in this way. This is part of the reason people resort to file sharing.

We'll have file sharing regardless. It's FREE.

clickbouyow said,
If only they would make it available to the world, then it would be worth it.

I may be wrong, but in the UK you actually pay a TV tax or something, that's why the BBC is only available there.

Yep, we have a television licence fee, which funds all of the BBC's radio, TV, mobile and online services for UK licence fee payers. International services like BBC America, BBC World News and BBC Lifestyle are funded from subscriptions and other commercial revenues.

DrunkenBeard said,

I may be wrong, but in the UK you actually pay a TV tax or something, that's why the BBC is only available there.

That's not really why it's only available there. BBC Radio is funded by the same fees, but it's available anywhere in the world. The real reason they restrict it is resale rights. They can make money by selling the rights to more populars shows to networks in other countries and they feel it would lower the value if people in those countries were able to watch them for free on the web instead. Since radio content is not re-sold, they don't restrict its streaming.